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eBook Like Water on Stone: The Story of Amnesty International ePub

eBook Like Water on Stone: The Story of Amnesty International ePub

by Jonathan Power

  • ISBN: 1555534872
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Jonathan Power
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Northeastern University Press (May 17, 2001)
  • Pages: 332
  • ePub book: 1875 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1843 kb
  • Other: lrf rtf lrf mbr
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 211

Description

like Morocco Also, the chapter on Amnesty's concerns about rampant abuse in the American prison system offers a pretty balanced, if sometimes inflammatory, outside perspective.

The organization "was right to intervene and insist on a decent prison regime" for members of the radical group. Also, the chapter on Amnesty's concerns about rampant abuse in the American prison system offers a pretty balanced, if sometimes inflammatory, outside perspective. Unfortunately, other sections are marred by Jonathan Power's soapbox sermonizing.

In Like Water on Stone, author Jonathan Power recognizes Amnesty's considerable achievements-the . There are two main issues I had with the book.

In Like Water on Stone, author Jonathan Power recognizes Amnesty's considerable achievements-the difficult struggles in Guatemala to help those facing death squads, discusses the case in the Central African Republic where Amnesty's masterful detective work exposed the massacre of defenseless children, and investigates attempts to bring former Chilean strongman Augustine Pinochet to justice. But Power does not shy away from raising the difficult questions about Amnesty's strategies.

Jonathan PowerLike Water On StoneSimilar books. The definitive story of the greatest art theft in history. In a secret meeting in 1981, a low-level Boston thief gave career gangster Ralph Rossetti the tip of a lifetime: the Isabella Stewart Gardne. ore. Books similar to Like Water On Stone: The Story Of Amnesty International. Like Water On Stone: The Story Of Amnesty International. When British attorney Peter Beneson founded Amnesty International in 1961 to campaign for the release of political prisoners, his idea of bombarding offending governments with letters, postcards, an.

Jonathan Power, international foreign affairs columnist for over 40 years with a weekly column that has been published in newspapers all .

Jonathan Power, international foreign affairs columnist for over 40 years with a weekly column that has been published in newspapers all around the world. Founded in London by a radical lawyer, Amnesty International is one of the most respected non-governmental organizations in the world.

The title is taken from Jonathan Power's excellent history of Amnesty: "Like Water On Stone - The Story of Amnesty International"

The title is taken from Jonathan Power's excellent history of Amnesty: "Like Water On Stone - The Story of Amnesty International". The reference is to water slowly slowly wearing away the rock through attrition - like the millions of letters sent by ordinary Amnesty members every year on behalf of those locked up simply for peacefully expressing their beliefs. I met a brave man in Rangoon, He was holding a flag and singing a tune He sang Release Aung San Suu Kyi! And give us our democracy.

In Like Water on Stone, author Jonathan Power recognizes Amnesty's considerable achievements-the difficult struggles in Guatemala to help those facing death squads, discusses the case in the Central African Republic where Amnesty's masterful detective work exposed the massacre o. .

Amnesty International. Sony Alpha-A6300 (Control). Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station22. cebu on October 26, 2019. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Similar books and articles. Human Rights Are Women's Right: Amnesty International and the Family. Vulliamy's Smears: Open Letter to Amnest International's London and Belfast Offices, on the Occasion of Noam Chomsky's Belfast Lecture Edward S. Herman And. David Peterson - unknown. The Implications of Formulating a Human Right to Water. Erik B. Bluemel - unknown. Is There a Puzzle About Water?

Cite this publication.

Cite this publication. Erin Gibbs Van Brunschot. The University of Calgary. Do you want to read the rest of this article?

Power, Jonathan, Like Water on Stone: The Story of Amnesty International. Palgrave Macmillan (2016) Amnesty International (AI). In: Palgrave Macmillan (eds) The Statesman’s Yearbook.

Power, Jonathan, Like Water on Stone: The Story of Amnesty International. Authors and Affiliations. Cite this chapter as: Palgrave Macmillan (2016) Amnesty International (AI). The Statesman’s Yearbook. Palgrave Macmillan, London. Publisher Name Palgrave Macmillan, London. Print ISBN 978-1-137-44008-2. Online ISBN 978-1-349-68398-7.

Provides an historical review of Amensty International from its earliest origins through the present day, as well as a close-up look at the ways the organization has assisted people in their diverse stuggles for human rights throughout the world.

Comments

Andromajurus Andromajurus
Amnesty International was started in 1961 by Peter Benenson, a british lwayer who read about students in Portugal (at that time under a military dictatorship) who received long prison terms for toasting freedom. His idea of flooding the offending government with letters, telegrams and unpleasant publicity was derided at the time as silly. Over the years, AI has kept its emphasis on those prisoners who do not use or advocate violence, and has stayed as non-partisan as possible in various international disputes while double and triple-checking all information it receives. Today, with members in over 160 countries, Amnesty International is the world's most influential private organization dealing with human rights.
This book looks at the difficulties faced by AI in its work around the world. Nigeria is the home of AI's most famous political prisoner, Olusegun Obasanjo (now President of Nigeria). Amnesty's attention to detail and fine detective work exposed the massacre of more than 100 children in the Central African Republic. Political freedom in China seems to go through phases of openness, only to be slammed shut by the government. The book also deals with death squads in Guatemala and attempts to bring former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet to justice.
The author also explores human rights in America. Around the world, America is the first one to say something to other countries whose human rights records are less-than-perfect. But, looking at America's domestic record of police brutality, racial profiling and inability to ratify various human rights conventions and treaties, the word "hypocrisy" comes to mind.
This is a fine piece of writing. Those who are already active in the human rights field, and those who just want to know something about AI (before becoming members) will learn a lot from this book. Highly recommended.
FailCrew FailCrew
This book is rather difficult to figure out, and ultimately it doesn't do justice to its titular organization. Despite the title, this is not really a history of Amnesty International. Instead, it is more of a compendium of investigative journalism towards the subject of human rights in the second half of the twentieth century, using examples of problem areas in which Amnesty made some impact. In fact, it becomes apparent that Jonathan Power is merely reporting on human rights episodes that he happens to be familiar with as a long-standing foreign affairs correspondent. Thus, the supposed focus on Amnesty International as a social movement and non-governmental organization, and the effectiveness of its efforts, mostly falls apart as the book progresses.

The actual history of the organization appears awkwardly in one chapter in the middle of the book, with most of the remainder consisting of rather standard political coverage of a very selective collection of human rights stories that seem to have been chosen arbitrarily by the author. At certain times, this does lead to very informative examinations of political and historical episodes that may be unfamiliar to the knowledgeable reader, such as a brutal dictatorship in the Central African Republic, or the inconsistent human rights record of the supposedly enlightened South Korea. Also, the chapter on Amnesty's concerns about rampant abuse in the American prison system offers a pretty balanced, if sometimes inflammatory, outside perspective.

Unfortunately, other sections are marred by Jonathan Power's soapbox sermonizing. For example, he wraps up examinations of trouble spots like Colombia, China, and North Korea with one-paragraph pronouncements on how these nations' myriad problems can be immediately solved. Also, there are a fair number of factual errors throughout the book (especially with the dates and locations of major geopolitical and colonialist developments), and I agree with the previous reviewer on how such minor missteps can add up to major reservations about Power's coverage. And finally, the reader may want to skip the interminable final chapter in which Power unleashes a windy and inconclusive lecture on the current state of human rights around the world, with only occasional non-sequiturs to remind the reader that this is still a book about Amnesty International. Overall, this book that claims to be about that great and committed organization is often just tangentially influenced by it. [~doomsdayer520~]