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eBook The Status Syndrome: How Social Standing Affects Our Health and Longevity ePub

eBook The Status Syndrome: How Social Standing Affects Our Health and Longevity ePub

by Michael Marmot

  • ISBN: 0805073701
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Michael Marmot
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Times Books (August 9, 2004)
  • Pages: 336
  • ePub book: 1844 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1708 kb
  • Other: txt lit doc mobi
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 789

Description

But as Sir Michael Marmot argues, we are looking at the issue backwards. The psychological experience of inequality, Marmot shows, has a profound effect on our lives.

But as Sir Michael Marmot argues, we are looking at the issue backwards. If we can understand these social inequalities, we can also mitigate their effects.

Электронная книга "The Status Syndrome: How Social Standing Affects Our Health and Longevity", Michael Marmot

Электронная книга "The Status Syndrome: How Social Standing Affects Our Health and Longevity", Michael Marmot. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Status Syndrome: How Social Standing Affects Our Health and Longevity" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Michael Marmot's book offers a drink from the fire hose of social epidemiology. This book educates and motivates you by introducing how lifestyle affects health and wealth. If you want to understand why the health of people living in the United States, the richest and most powerful country in world history, lags far behind the health of people in other rich nations, then be prepared to wet your whistle here. Marmot, a British doctor who received his epidemiologic training in the United States, directed the Whitehall II studies of British civil servants. It personifies negatives and illustrates how to change your social standing for the better.

Sir Michael Marmot: Social Determinants of Health (2014 WORLD. MINDS) - Продолжительность: 22:32 WORLD.

Michael Marmot's book, The Status Syndrome, is about how a person's social rank influences his or her health. It's how much control we feel we have over our lives that influences our health and contentment. The book's focus is on conditions in the richer countries, as opposed to those nations so poor that one would expect poor health. Social rank may be measured in a number of different ways, such as education, or income. This is based on the Whitehall study, so no homelessness or absolute poverty, just a comparison between those people who push buttons, those who actually make major decisions and all those in the middle ranks.

Here, Marmot distinguishes between pov- By Michael Marmot. 319 pp. New York, Times Books, 2004. Poverty, he explains, deprives ISBN 0-8050-7370-1. people of the capabilities to lead the lives they would wish to lead. If you have little money, more money would benefit health, but if you have more m ichael marmot’s book offers a drink from the fire.

Marmot, M. G. Publication date. Social status, Longevity. New York : Times Books. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Gutierres on November 19, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Status Syndrome: How Your Social Standing Directly Affects Your Health and Life Expectancy. March 1954 · Social casework. By John R. Searle January 1997.

He calls this effect the status syndrome. The status syndrome is pervasive. It determines the chances that you will succumb to heart disease, stroke, cancers, infectious diseases, even suicide and homicide. And the issue, as Marmot shows, is not simply one of income or lifestyle.

Syndrome : How Social Standing Affects Our Health and Longevity. This book is the perfect introduction to the study of Health Inequalities, especially in the context of occupational health. Students are gripped.

Status Syndrome : How Social Standing Affects Our Health and Longevity. A topic in its infancy.

Based on decades of his own research, a pioneering epidemiologist reveals the surprising factors behind who lives longer and why You probably didn't realize that when you graduated from college you increased your lifespan, or that your co-worker who has a master's degree is more likely to live a longer and healthier life. Seemingly small social differences in education, job title, income, even the size of your house or apartment have a profound impact on your health.For years we have focused merely on how advances in technology and genetics can extend our lives and cure disease. But as Sir Michael Marmot argues, we are looking at the issue backwards. Social inequalities are not a footnote to the real causes of ill health in industrialized countries; they are the cause. The psychological experience of inequality, Marmot shows, has a profound effect on our lives. And while this may be alarming, it also suggests a ray of hope. If we can understand these social inequalities, we can also mitigate their effects. In this groundbreaking book, Marmot, an internationally renowned epidemiologist, marshals evidence from around the world and from nearly thirty years of his research to demonstrate that how much control you have over your life and the opportunities you have for full social participation are crucial for health, well-being, and longevity. Just as Bowling Alone changed the way we think about community in America, The Status Syndrome will change the way we think about our society and how we live our lives.

Comments

Error parents Error parents
Where Dr. Marmot discusses the medicine, he is clear, well-argued, and thought-provoking. The evidence certainly makes one think about the effects low-level, persistent stress can have on us all and highlights how intertwined our bodies and health are with the wider world. This alone is worth four stars.

Since the book largely focuses on the medicine, I can only withhold one star for the policy parts. However, pretty much any point at which the book steers into policy, it’s not worth reading.

Bafflingly, he barely even pays lip service to human nature and its effects on poverty and subsequently policy, nor does he pay much mind to whether the policies he espouses have any evidence to support their efficacy. I won’t ramble on refuting things point-by-point, but anyone with a bit of background in economics or public policy should be able to find several issues with little effort.

As someone with scientific curiosity and an appreciation for those who attempt to tackle the complexities of human health, I enjoyed 90% of this book. As a career policy analyst with a background in economics, I found the other 10% naive, if not outright disingenuous.
Akinozuru Akinozuru
This very well written book addresses 4 hugely important issues, one each of fact, theory, policy and morality. A MATTER of FACT: The higher an individual's socio-economic status, the better their odds of a long and healthy life. Among populations, health and longevity rise as socio-economic status rise, and fall as it falls. "In other words, health follows a social gradient. I call this the status syndrome (Marmot:1)." The status syndrome is scientifically established fact and Marmot lays out an accessible summary of the scientific case based on decades of research from around the world. A QUESTION of THEORY: The status syndrome is fact: the theoretic question it raises is, WHY? Marmot advances an elegant and plausible theory for WHY socio-economic status so greatly affects health: socio-economic status affects (1) people's control over their lives AND (2) the density of their social networks, both of which, in turn, affect people's levels of chronic stress, which, in turn, greatly affects health & longevity. Most of "The Status Syndrome" is dedicated to the preceding issues. Towards the end Marmot address issues of policy and morality. POSSIBILITIES of POLICY: given the preceding, *IF* societies could reduce socio-economic inequality *THEN* they could reduce health inequality -- and *IF* they could eliminate the former *THEN* they could reduce whatever degree of the later is part of the status syndrome (not all health inequality is). The POLICY question raised by the epidemiological science is, to what degree CAN societies reduce socio-economic inequality? And this question has two dimensions: first, is it possible to design policies that WOULD reduce, if not eliminate, socio-economic inequality (at acceptable costs) AND, if so, would it be possible to institute such policies in, say, the United States, where inequality is rapidly increasing. From a pioneering researcher and theorist Marmot has dedicated himself of late to political lobbying for programs that will ameliorate the status syndrome: he says that he knows that eliminating inequality is not on. Finally, there is a moral question in this book: assuming that we CAN reduce or eliminate the status syndrome, SHOULD we do so? Marmot takes the answer to this question as all but self-evident.
Xangeo Xangeo
Excellent book. A must-read for anyone in public health.
Fiarynara Fiarynara
I got this book ONLY to read the research. Often it is true, that the truth, is not logical. ... or at least counter-intuitive. I ignored all the social ramblings. This book is WELL RESEARCHED. It seems status DOES predict life expectancy! Very interesting research and conclusions. Definitely motivating.

... I'll live longer if I get my PhD.

More control/autonomy in one's live = more life. Who knew!

Great book! Worth the read - or even a skim.
MisTereO MisTereO
This text book arrived in great condition however, the text book was no longer required, so, I returned it.
Thanks

Elie Jackson, Jr.
caster caster
This book educates and motivates you by introducing how lifestyle affects health and wealth. It personifies negatives and illustrates how to change your social standing for the better. Real life examples make this easy to understand and actually quite enjoyable!
Inth Inth
Love this book - have read it twice more cover to cover. Michael is a leader in research in this area and this book gives place to deep thought and understanding of the human race.
Book fit my expectations, bought for college son but professor not accept book for class, great price, good condition. thank you