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eBook Witness to History: The Memoirs of Mauno Koivisto, President of Finland 1982 - 1994 ePub

eBook Witness to History: The Memoirs of Mauno Koivisto, President of Finland 1982 - 1994 ePub

by Mauno Koivisto

  • ISBN: 0809320452
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Mauno Koivisto
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Southern Illinois University Press; 1st edition (July 1, 1997)
  • Pages: 316
  • ePub book: 1324 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1802 kb
  • Other: rtf txt doc lrf
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 527

Description

Mauno Henrik Koivisto GOIH (Finnish pronunciation: ; 25 November 1923 – 12 May 2017) was a Finnish politician who served as the ninth President of Finland from 1982 to 1994.

Mauno Henrik Koivisto GOIH (Finnish pronunciation: ; 25 November 1923 – 12 May 2017) was a Finnish politician who served as the ninth President of Finland from 1982 to 1994. He also served twice as Prime Minister, 1968 – 1970 and 1979 – 1982. He was the first Social Democratic Party member to be elected President of Finland.

When Mauno Koivisto was elected president of Finland in 1982, Leonid Brezhnev was still in the Kremlin and Ronald Reagan had been the . president for a year. Relations between the superpowers were at low ebb. Relations between the superpowers were at low ebb, and there seemed little prospect of improvement

When Mauno Koivisto was elected president of Finland in 1982, Leonid Brezhnev was still in the Kremlin and Ronald Reagan had been the . Relations between the superpowers were at low ebb, and there seemed little prospect of improvement. A "Treaty on Friendship, Cooperation and Mutual Assistance" with the USSR had been signed by a weakened Finland in When Mauno Koivisto was elected president of Finland in 1982, Leonid Brezhnev was still in the Kremlin and Ronald Reagan had been the . A "Treaty on Friendship, Cooperation and Mutual Assistance" with the USSR had been signed by a weakened Finland in 1948, and its military provisions led to talk of "Finlandization. The Soviets would not accept the concept of Finnish neutrality, to which the Finns adhered strongly.

Witness to history : the memoirs of Mauno Koisvisto president of Finland, 1982-1994 translated from the Finnish by Klaus Tornudd ; introduction by David Kirby. Witness to history : the memoirs of Mauno Koisvisto president of Finland, 1982-1994 translated from the Finnish by Klaus Tornudd ; introduction by David Kirby.

File:Mauno Koivisto Coat of Arms. Armorial of Presidents of Finland. This file contains additional information such as Exif metadata which may have been added by the digital camera, scanner, or software program used to create or digitize it.

Historian tekijät, 1995 /Witness to History, 1997 Kaksi kautta I. Muistikuvia ja merkintöjä 1982-1994, 1994.

President of the Republic of Finland 1982-1994 Governor of Suomen Pankki – Finlands Bank 1968-82 (The Bank of Finland) Managing Director of Helsingin Työväen Säästöpankki 1959-67 Director of Helsingin Työväen Säästöpankki 1958-59 (Helsinki Workers’ Savings Bank) Vocational Counsellor of the City of Turku 1954-57 Member of the Turku City Council Primary School Teacher 1951-53 Manager of the Harbour. Labour Office of Turku 1948-51. Member of the Cabinet.

President Mauno Koivisto of Finland speaking at a 1992 conference on European . Mr. Koivisto served two six-year terms, from 1982 to 1994.

President Mauno Koivisto of Finland speaking at a 1992 conference on European security in Helsinki. Matti Bj'Rkman/Lehtikuva, via Associated Press. By The Associated Press. Mauno Koivisto, who as Finland’s last president during the Cold War steered the country out of isolation and into the European Union, died on Friday in Helsinki. He was 93. The Finnish president’s office announced his death. His wife, Tellervo Koivisto, said this year that he had Alzheimer’s disease. His down-to-earth manner and dry humor, often laced with sarcasm and philosophical pondering, won him wide popularity.

Mauno Koivisto (25 November 1923 – 12 May 2017) was President of Finland from 27 January 1982 to 1 March 1994, succeeding Urho Kekkonen and preceding Martti Ahtisaari. He also served as Prime Minister from 3 March 1968 to 14 May 1970 (succeeding Rafael Paasio and preceding Teuvo Aura ) and from 26 May 1979 to 26 January 1982 (interrupting Kalevi Sorsa 's terms). He was the first Social Democratic Party of Finland member to serve as President.

When Mauno Koivisto was elected president of Finland in 1982, Leonid Brezhnev was still in the Kremlin and Ronald Reagan had been the U.S. president for a year. Relations between the superpowers were at low ebb, and there seemed little prospect of improvement. A "Treaty on Friendship, Cooperation and Mutual Assistance" with the USSR had been signed by a weakened Finland in 1948, and its military provisions led to talk of "Finlandization." The Soviets would not accept the concept of Finnish neutrality, to which the Finns adhered strongly. When Koivisto left office in 1994, the Soviet Union no longer existed, the 1948 treaty had been replaced, and Finland was about to become a member of the European Union, something unthinkable a few years earlier.

In his last years as president, Koivisto played a major role in three important developments. First, there was the urgent need of the Soviet Union, and subsequently of Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent States, for external economic support—a fact appreciated by Koivisto, a former central banker, but less so by the U.S. administration and the International Monetary Fund, both of which he sought to persuade. Secondly, when the three Baltic republics were emerging as independent states, they looked to nearby Finland as a role model and as a supportive ally, a circumstance that caused Koivisto considerable trouble in light of his own delicate balance with Russia. In the third instance, the question of whether Finland should seek EU membership involved national self-examination as well as delicate external negotiations.

Koivisto’s account is partly a historical record. As events unfold, we follow his thinking as we become privy to his conversations and correspondence with his own ministers as well as with his foreign counterparts. As such, this book is a case history of statecraft in a small country involved in great events, but it is much more than that, for Koivisto does not miss the human element or overlook the ironies of power politics among nations.