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eBook Multicultural Nationalism: Civilizing Difference, Constituting Community (Law and Society (Paperback)) ePub

eBook Multicultural Nationalism: Civilizing Difference, Constituting Community (Law and Society (Paperback)) ePub

by Kernerman

  • ISBN: 0774810017
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Kernerman
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: UBC Press (January 4, 2006)
  • Pages: 146
  • ePub book: 1378 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1418 kb
  • Other: azw txt doc lrf
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 280

Description

Home Gerald Kernerman Multicultural Nationalism: Civilizing Difference, Constituting. Title: Multicultural Nationalism: Civilizing. Publisher: UBC Press Publication Date: 2006 Binding: Paperback Book Condition: Good.

Home Gerald Kernerman Multicultural Nationalism: Civilizing Difference, Constituting. Multicultural Nationalism: Civilizing Difference, Constituting Community (Law and Society (Paperback)). Published by UBC Press, 2006. ISBN 10: 0774810017, ISBN 13: 9780774810012. ulticultural Nationalism : Civilizing Difference, Constituting Community.

book by Gerald Kernerman. Canadian citizenship has long been characterized in opposition to that of our southern neighbour as a mosaic instead of a melting pot. Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

Multicultural Nationalism book. Start by marking Multicultural Nationalism: Civilizing Difference, Constituting Community as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Civilizing Difference, Constituting Community. By. Gerald Kernerman. Canada's national question is self-defeating: attempts to constitute a Canadian political community generate polarizing and depoliticizing deliberations.

Multicultural nationalism: Civilizing difference, constituting community. Culture, citizenship, and community: A contextual exploration of justice as evenhandedness. The act of praising certain characteristics or abilities seems to have become a political instrument whose unspoken function consists in inserting individuals or social groups into existing structures of dominance by encouraging a positive self-image.

SERIES: Law and Society. Kernerman's book is a good survey of the -nationalism debates in Canada. Multicultural Nationalism makes an important contribution to debates about national unity and diversity in Canada. Pithy summaries of the major theories and concepts informing the debates make this a useful introduction to the issues involved. Kernerman persuasively shows how the problematic logic of thinking in terms of dichotomies is not only woven into the political and public debates but can also be detected in the theories of political philosophers such as Charles Taylor and Will Kymlicka.

Multiculturalism, the view that cultures, races, and ethnicities, particularly those of minority groups, deserve special acknowledgement of their differences within a dominant political culture. Thank you for your feedback.

GERALD KERNERMAN, Multicultural Nationalism: Civilizing Difference, Constituting Community. Multiculturalism looms large in Canadian public discourse, but the picture that emerges is far from consistent. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2005, 144 . index.

All societies are stratified on a hierarchical basis into social categories or social strata.

There is not a strict one-to-one correspondence between a society and a nation-state. Nation-states are political creations that may contain a single culture or several cultures. While it is possible to talk about cultures at different levels, for example, an "American society," and "American culture," it is important to recognize there are several societies within America, each with its own culture. All societies are stratified on a hierarchical basis into social categories or social strata.

Canadian citizenship has long been characterized in opposition to that of our southern neighbour as a “mosaic” instead of a “melting pot.” Acceptance of minority ethnic, racial, religious, cultural, and linguistic groups has largely been seen as key to our sense of what it means to be Canadian. Such multiplicity, however, has given rise to ongoing debates over equality, diversity, identity, and unity.This groundbreaking work interrogates and expands the accepted modes of thinking through Canadian citizenship. Drawing on feminist and postcolonial theorists, Gerald Kernerman undertakes a discourse analysis of Canadian constitutional and policy documents, public speeches, and media texts. He examines and critiques what he sees as the two major competing understandings of how Canada ought to manage its diversity, both of which seek to define an overarching notion of Canadian unity: on the one hand, the argument for differentiated citizenship, or “difference,” and on the other, the case for universal and undifferentiated citizenship, or “equality.” Positing that each of these positions ends at the same impasse in its preoccupation with the challenges diversity represents for cohesion and stability, Kernerman proposes an alternative -- a post-nationalist multiculturalism that does not attempt to ask, or answer, the thorny “unity” question.An important contribution to the critical literature on Canadian politics, citizenship, and multiculturalism, Multicultural Nationalism will appeal to political scientists and philosophers, as well as those with an interest in critical race theory, liberal multiculturalism, and law and society.