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eBook Train Whistle Guitar: A Novel ePub

eBook Train Whistle Guitar: A Novel ePub

by Albert Murray

  • ISBN: 0375703365
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Albert Murray
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Vintage (November 24, 1998)
  • Pages: 192
  • ePub book: 1803 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1819 kb
  • Other: lrf rtf mobi doc
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 795

Description

Train Whistle Guitar: A Novel Paperback – November 24, 1998. Train Whistle Guitar" is the closest thing to that. This book will introduce you to the freshest and wisest American voice I have read in the last three years

Train Whistle Guitar: A Novel Paperback – November 24, 1998. by. Albert Murray (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. This book will introduce you to the freshest and wisest American voice I have read in the last three years. After finishing this book for my course work I picked it up again the following weekend to return to the beginning once more.

What a wonderful collection of novels and poems, with an unique view of America. I can do no better to indicate the treasures here than to quote this passage: Uncle Jerome lives in Gasoline Pint, and has his own take on the history and especially the Biblical foundations of American Slavery, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and our continuing efforts to hold the nation together.

Train Whistle Guitar" is the closest thing to that. The major accomplishment that Murray makes in Train Whistle Guitar is the incorporation of the improvisational rhythms of Jazz and blues into speech. In other words, Murray's narrator and characters talk in riffs, call-and-response patters, in trading-twelve exchanges. It's awkward to talk about this but pick up this book and you will get an idea of what I am driving at.

Train Whistle Guitar book. Set in 1920s Alabama, this novel follows the life of a young boy and the lessons he learns in school, at Papa Gumbo Willie McWorthy's barbershop, and from Luzana Cholly, a gun-toting guitar player.

Information about the book, Train Whistle Guitar: A Novel: the Fiction, Paperback, by Albert Murray (Vintage Books, Nov . More books like Train Whistle Guitar: A Novel may be found by selecting the categories below: Fiction, General.

Information about the book, Train Whistle Guitar: A Novel: the Fiction, Paperback, by Albert Murray (Vintage Books, Nov 24, 1998). Tell us what do you think about Train Whistle Guitar: A Novel.

Train Whistle Guitar (1974) introduces Murray's recurring narrator and protagonist, Scooter, a "Southern .

Train Whistle Guitar (1974) introduces Murray's recurring narrator and protagonist, Scooter, a "Southern jackrabbit raised in a briarpatch" too nimble ever to receive a scratch. Scooter's education in books, music, and the blue-steel bent-note blues-ballad realities of American life continues in The Spyglass Tree (1991), Murray's "Portrait of the Artist as a Tuskegee Undergraduate.

Train whistle guitar. African American teenage boys - Fiction. African American musicians - Fiction. Vintage International. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on August 5, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Train Whistle Guitar, in one sense, is ainagnificent rebuttal to these views; in it Murray evokes his climatic sense of life: as against the tennhiological abstractions and categories derived from procedures. It would be doubly ironic, however, given his literary bias, his insistence on the infinite rine of human Possibility, to place Murray's novel only in the realm of polemics, politics, rhetoric, surveys and statisticians

Train Whistle Guitar. Published in. the United States by Vintage Books, a division of. Random House, In. New York, and. simultaneously in Canada by Random House of. Canada Limited, Toronto. Originally published in. hardcover by Pantheon Books, a division of. New York, in 1991.

Albert Murray was born in Nokomis, Alabama, in 1916. He grew up in Mobile and was educated at Tuskegee Institute, where he later taught literature and directed the college theater.

Set in 1920s Alabama, this novel follows the life of a young boy and the lessons he learns in school, at Papa Gumbo Willie McWorthy's barbershop, and from Luzana Cholly, a gun-toting guitar player

Comments

Zamo Zamo
This is a terrific novel - & one I'm sorry it took me 62 years to discover. It's a novel about growing up in the rural 1920's - 30's South, about forging and revelation of identity. It has heroes, villains, Blues and jazz, guitars, piano, jook joints, best friend taunts and banter, make-believe and running away, barbershop boasting and laughter, Church enthusiasms, summer swing porch 'also and also', swamps, bayous, railroad tracks, country roads, wash hanging, Sunday breakfasts, sawmill lunches, neighborhood gossip, Bible quoting, brutal domestic violence, teenage flirtation and sexual awakening, Death, secrets, lies, and a discovery. The language is lush, ardent, lyrical. It is tragedy, comedy and farce; it is sensuous, vivid and memorable in its poetically realized imagery; and it is enormously pleasurable to read out loud with its racing, improvisational bebop pulsing rhythms. Indeed, this is a prose poetry that almost has to be read out loud to gain the full measure of its true literary accomplishment. This is a beautiful, wondrous, liberating masterpiece, an "extension, elaboration and refinement", as Murray would say, of "idiomatic particulars" that result in a universal statement about what it means to be human, anytime, anywhere. As I say, a masterpiece.
Androwyn Androwyn
This novel, clearly autobiographical, is the work of a brilliant writer who has been ignored by reading America. It is a remarkable portrait of a young black artist and his country culture in the Deep South. It is, without trying for it, a deep indictment of Jim Crow. It is about a life, pure and simple. And if Murray had been a white child, this would have been as celebrated as McCuller's The Member of the Wedding. It is a better book than Member in many ways; it is curiously less self-absorbed and, unlike so many Southern books about Jim Crow, it lacks self-justification. Today we need to read this book. We are in the throes of what one can only pray (without much hope) is the final gasps of racism in this country. Racism will survive this turmoil, I'm sure, but it will be forever weakened. And the reason for that is: we are beginning to drop our masks, masks of all kinds, and look each other in the face. This book is not about whites mistreating blacks in the South. It is about a young boy, gifted and imaginative, growing toward self-actualization in his culture. It is not like a young white boy's life. And the differences are outlined, but they are formative. White and black - read this fine book. And begin to walk in another's shoes. The road is the same road. We have different shoes.
Beydar Beydar
This wasn't a smooth read, kind of choppy at times, but I did find the dialect and story interesting and was hard to put down. I thought it was going to be more of a blues novel than it was, I will say it inspired me to keep writing in the Old South, back when the Blues were king.
Ynonno Ynonno
The fact that I am just now reading Albert Murray, 97 years after his birth and a month after his death, is troubling. I should have learned about him in high school, should have taken a class focused solely on his works in college and should have been talking about him with our two sons in the same conversations in which I mentioned Hemingway, Faulkner, Steinbeck, Salinger, Kerouac and Twain. It isn't the fault of the preceding giants of literature that they were white men, but it is my fault, and perhaps that of our society, that intellectuals like Murray who wrote with the same degree of artistry but offered the additional benefit of a cohesive theoretical/critical framework underpinning his work were intentionally or unintentionally relegated to the outskirts of our collective, literary consciousness like the inhabitants of Scooter's "briarpatch," Gasoline Point. I'm so shocked, in fact, at the apparent disparity between Train Whistle Guitar and Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, justifiably accepted by most scholars as a keystone of American literature, that I'll be re-reading Huck Finn before completing Murray's semi-autobiographical trilogy.

My initial gut reaction, however, is that Murray's work offers both the casual reader and the serious student everything that Huck Finn offers and much more. There is the same earthy, history-rich colloquialisms of the American South, but Murray manages to seamlessly augment them with the music-born poetry/prose we so often attribute almost exclusively to Kerouac. Twain is justifiably credited for illustrating the disparate lives of blacks and whites in the Antebellum South but inescapably does so from the perspective of those in power. Because Murray both grew up in a community like Gasoline Point and approached the story with the eye of a forensic poet, we are presented not only with the words of disenfranchised African Americans but their thoughts and the first-hand symbol-rich detail that even the most empathetic outsider would have missed. Even the flora of the first few pages speak volumes to the socioeconomic status and Nature-centric lifestyle of Gasoline Point's residents. For an introduction to the power of plants in Murray's work read Bert Hitchcock's fascinating essay on the "chinaberry tree" in "Albert Murray and the Aesthetic Imagination of a Nation" edited by Barbara A. Baker. And then there is the music: the Blues which evolved and gave birth to Jazz which in turn informed Murray's art and his theories about race in America, literature and literary criticism. Murray once said "We invented the blues. Europeans invented psychoanalysis. You invent what you need." While my review has focused mainly on the historical and critical importance of Train Whistle Guitar, without the blues-infused emotions of the work, it wouldn't move us enough to be worth analyzing.