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eBook Deconstructing Tyrone: A New Look at Black Masculinity in the Hip-Hop Generation ePub

eBook Deconstructing Tyrone: A New Look at Black Masculinity in the Hip-Hop Generation ePub

by Natalie Hopkinson

  • ISBN: 1573442577
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Natalie Hopkinson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cleis Press; 1st Edition edition (September 25, 2006)
  • Pages: 264
  • ePub book: 1617 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1154 kb
  • Other: lrf rtf mbr lit
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 749

Description

DECONSTRUCTING TYRONE by Natalie Hopkinson and Natalie Y. Moore examines the dichotomy of black men and their . They look at how the media portrays black men and how people view them in the hip-hop generation.

DECONSTRUCTING TYRONE by Natalie Hopkinson and Natalie Y. Moore examines the dichotomy of black men and their masculinity from different perspectives. The chapter "Boy Born Saturday" talks about Michigan's "Hip-Hop Mayor", Kwame Kilpatrick and his role as mayor of Detroit and how he is perceived in and outside of Michigan.

Deconstructing Tyrone book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Deconstructing Tyrone: A New Look at Black Masculinity in the Hip-Hop Generation as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Amos Lassen Natalie Hopkinson and Natalie Moore use the name .

book by Natalie Y. Moore. Two smart Black women break the Tyrone code ? with affection, with respect, but with no illusions. Amos Lassen Natalie Hopkinson and Natalie Moore use the name "Tyrone" to symbolize the black man as seen through the media lens and stereotype as well as through the eyes of the black woman. They look at black masculinity from different perspectives with insight so as not to find a consensus but a new way of looking.

NATALIE HOPKINSON (Co-Author, "Deconstructing Tyrone: A New Look at Black Masculinity in the Hip-Hop Generation"): Thank you, Cheryl. CORLEY: Well, your book takes a look at black masculinity by focusing on different black men, by looking at relationships between black men and black women; it includes a chapter on black gay men, which you didn't name, but what I like to call Tyrone and Tyrone. Soundbite of laughter). CORLEY: And there's much more.

In Deconstructing Tyrone, the authors, journalists Natalie Y. Moore and Natalie Hopkinson, examine Black masculinity from a variety of perspectives, looking not for consensus but for insight. With chapters on Detroit mayor Kwame Kilpatrick, on the complicated relationship between women and hip-hop, on babydaddies, on gay Black men on and off the down low, on strippers and their fathers, on Black men in the office, at school, and in jail, Deconstructing Tyrone presents a multifaceted picture of American Black men now.

Book Description: Two smart Black women break the Tyrone code ? with affection, with respect .

Book Description: Two smart Black women break the Tyrone code ? with affection, with respect, but with no illusions. In Deconstructing Tyrone, the authors, journalists Natalie Y.

Location & Availability for: Deconstructing Tyrone : a new look at b. by Natalie Hopkinson and Natalie Y.

by Natalie Hopkinson and Natalie Y. Main Author: Hopkinson, Natalie. Other Names: Moore, Natalie Y. Published: San Francisco : Cleis Press, c2006.

Natalie Hopkinson, Natalie Y Moore. Two smart Black women break the Tyrone code - with affection, with respect, but with no illusions

Natalie Hopkinson, Natalie Y Moore. Two smart Black women break the Tyrone code - with affection, with respect, but with no illusions. Smooth-talking, irresistible Tyrone - the swagger in his step, the sexy drawl, the poetry and rhythm in his essence - the militant revolutionary of the 1960s evolved into the pimp/thug of the hip-hop era. Tyrone is the Black man seen through the media lens, through stereotype,.

Black masculinity in the hip-hop culture often promotes instances of. .

Black masculinity in the hip-hop culture often promotes instances of homophobia, effeminophobia, and misogyny. To reify an authentic black masculinity, individuals within the hip-hop genre police its boundaries through discourse and behavior. Deconstructing Tyrone: A New Look at Black Masculinity in the Hip-Hop Generation. Her book features interviews with exotic dancers, black hip hop groupies, and hip hop generation members Jacklyn "Diva" Bush, rapper Trina, and filmmaker Aishah Simmons, along with the voices of many "everyday" young women.

Two smart Black women break the Tyrone code — with affection, with respect, but with no illusions.Black men as fathers, sons, teachers, lovers, rap stars, professionals, fantasy objects, and cultural constructs — a multifaceted picture of American Black men today.You know Tyrone. Smooth-talking, irresistible Tyrone — the swagger in his step, the sexy drawl, the poetry and rhythm in his essence — the militant revolutionary of the 1960s evolved into the pimp/thug of the hip-hop era. Tyrone is the Black man seen through the media lens, through stereotype, through the eyes of Black women. He’s "Talk Show Tyrone," all muscle and defiance, “an archetype converted to a hit single.”In Deconstructing Tyrone, the authors, journalists Natalie Y. Moore and Natalie Hopkinson, examine Black masculinity from a variety of perspectives, looking not for consensus but for insight. With chapters on Detroit mayor Kwame Kilpatrick, on the complicated relationship between women and hip-hop, on babydaddies, on gay Black men on and off the down low, on strippers and their fathers, on Black men in the office, at school, and in jail, Deconstructing Tyrone presents a multifaceted picture of American Black men now.

Comments

Vudomuro Vudomuro
Deconstructing Tyrone is an excellent profile of what ails us today. It gives an outstanding look at the changing face of the Black community and how the hip -hop and most definitely Rap Music has affected the mentality and perspective of what is realistic in the lives of these young men. The ideal of being a man has changed as these young people lose perspective on who are the role models in their lives. No longer can they see in the hard working 9-5 males they see everyday as the men they want to become. Fast money, fast women, and fast materials have changed that perspective. Flash, Cash and Dash is the way of the streets.
The book outlines the choice and change of the community and how the effects have extended itself to the outer suburbs and beyond. The glamour of the "Baller" lifestyle has changed the game. The author profiles certain examples and the pushes and pulls that lead these young men to believe that the only way out of what they see as a deperate, never ending life is to go the way of the "hustler," "baller," "player," or "pimp."

An entertaining read that anyone could learn from. One which will give a real perspective on "keeping it real."
Jia Jia
He tells tells the truth even though we want to try to ignore reality. He keeps it real and tells it like it is with no strings. Keep it up. Excellent read; truth at its best.
ME ME
Two African-American, female journalists, the Natalies, discuss current topics related to African-American males. Oftentimes, I think journalists don't make quality booklength works. I am glad these writers overcame that trend. They cover a wide range of topics from boys' education, strippers, gay men, entrepreneurialism, inter alia. Because of the East Coast-West Coast rap rivalry, many Americans, across racial identities, forget that many Blacks live in the Midwest. Black Chicagoans made house music and Black Detroiters made techno, for example. This book is heavily Midwest-focused, and I appreciated that novelty, especially as a Black person from the region.

This book is much stronger than Cose's "Envy of the World" or Dawsey's "Living to Tell About It." You may want to read it alongside strong works such as Neal's "New Black Man." This was published by Cleis Press. I am impressed how that press is including more than Susie Bright fans recently.

I learned some interesting things from this book. For example, the Natalies say that upper-class Black men marry as rarely as poor Black males. I love that the authors call out Jawanza Kunjufu on his homophobic writings. Still, the journalists come to no conclusion and this may frustrate many. For example, do they think Detroit's Mayor Kilpatrick is a bad or good politician? Do they think strippers are victims of abuse or women with much agency and business skills? Also, some chapters felt too internal, as if they were talking to themselves, rather than about topics that others would find interesting.

Two chapters, one on strippers and one on adolescent girls, troubled the ideas of Black masculinity. On the one hand, these chapters can be seen as anti-essentialist. As women's studies departments become gender studies departments, space is being made to discuss males and this book reflects that. This may prove, again, how much males and females need each other. On the other hand, some may say the writers are going off-topic. These female-dominant chapters may suggest the writers were running out of topics or had to go to women in order to discuss Black males.

The authors spoke in Chicago in November of last year and I regret not hearing their talk deeply. I recommend this book for many readers, across age and gender categories.
Uanabimo Uanabimo
When Erykah Badu sang the song Tyrone, it was a defining statement of a black man and what he does or does not do. DECONSTRUCTING TYRONE by Natalie Hopkinson and Natalie Y. Moore examines the dichotomy of black men and their masculinity from different perspectives. They look at how the media portrays black men and how people view them in the hip-hop generation.

The chapter "Boy Born Saturday" talks about Michigan's "Hip-Hop Mayor", Kwame Kilpatrick and his role as mayor of Detroit and how he is perceived in and outside of Michigan. The chapter named "Thomas, 36" is about Washington Wizards forward Etan Thomas, a basketball player who has a voice outside of the basketball arena, who is not afraid to pronounce his dissent to the Iraq war and is not afraid to write poetry as well. The chapter "Hip-Hop" further explores the role of hip-hop on black men and how their masculinity is seen. And one of the most interesting chapters was "Boy Born Friday" about Kofi "Debo" Ajabu, a young man schooled and trained in the Black Panther Militia, college student and a gang member. His life takes a turn for the worse and even with all his knowledge and his belief the establishment has been a suppressor, his own actions caused him the biggest trouble. The other chapters in the book are just as informative and insightful.

DECONSTRUCTING TYRONE: A New Look at Black Masculinity in the Hip-Hop Generation is not a negative portrayal of black men, but the truth as seen from different viewpoints. Hopkinson and Moore used a variety of sources, even their own personal views to explore black masculinity. Although some of the observations are not new, they are still meaningful. Hopkinson and Moore are not offering definitive solutions for a better perception of black men, just views on how they are perceived and ways to hopefully open dialogue for change.

Reviewed by Cashana Seals

of The RAWSISTAZ Reviewers
Lanin Lanin
I am a Black man reading this book and I am happy to see that the sisters wrote from love and without being damning. They acknowledge that Black women, racism and our history in this country are factors in who we are without letting it be an excuse for our shortcomings. And as a Washingtonian, I am looking forward to Natalie H's book on go-go.
lucky kitten lucky kitten
Its about time that some one came out with a book like this. It was an interesting read. In the book, it dealt with issues that ALL men deal with; it deals with the black male; how we can overcome some of the issues that we are dealing with.
Sarin Sarin
Very interesting insight. Made me review my perspective on Black Masculinity. I enjoyed it.