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eBook Tell Them We Are Going Home: The Odyssey of the Northern Cheyennes ePub

eBook Tell Them We Are Going Home: The Odyssey of the Northern Cheyennes ePub

by John H. Monnett

  • ISBN: 0806133031
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: John H. Monnett
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Univ of Oklahoma Pr (March 1, 2001)
  • Pages: 252
  • ePub book: 1940 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1140 kb
  • Other: lit azw txt mbr
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 371

Description

Start by marking Tell Them We Are Going Home: The . The best book on the epic trek of a few hundred Northern Cheyenne from Oklahoma to their homeland in southern Montana/northern Wyoming an. .

Start by marking Tell Them We Are Going Home: The Odyssey of the Northern Cheyennes as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The best book on the epic trek of a few hundred Northern Cheyenne from Oklahoma to their homeland in southern Montana/northern Wyoming and the unsuccessful pursuit of them by thousands of soldiers and civilians.

Personal Name: Monnett, John . On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book.

Personal Name: Monnett, John H. Publication, Distribution, et. Norman, . The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Tell them we are going home : the odyssey of the northern Cheyennes, John H. Monnett.

Cheyenne Autumn" so closely identifies with the Indians that the white side of the story is not only inadequately presented but also distorted into almost cartoon villainy at times. Cheyenne Autumn" is a pleasure to read, but it should not be mistaken for real history. Interestingly, in his text Monnett refers to Sandoz's book as a "novel".

Cheyenne women, some of them carrying children, fought soldiers as Cheyenne men created a rear-guard action .

Cheyenne women, some of them carrying children, fought soldiers as Cheyenne men created a rear-guard action against the garrison at Fort Robinson. But most of the Cheyennes were cut-down less than a mile from the barracks as they attempted to flee to safety across the White River. Dull Knife and several other Cheyennes miraculously escaped and later hid amongst the Lakotas on the Pine Ridge Reservation, where they were allowed to stay.

The Odyssey of the Northern Cheyennes. Published December 2004 by University of Oklahoma Press. Relocation, Cheyenne Indians, History. The events that would lead to the Cheyennes' odyssey began along the bluffs above the Red Fork of Powder River, near the Big Horn Mountains (Bighorn, by modern spelling) in Wyoming Territory, on November 25, 1876.

Tell Them We Are Going Home: The Odyssey of the Northern Cheyennes John H. His many books on the West and American Indians include The Sand Creek Massacre, The Peace Chiefs of the Cheyennes, and Tribal Wars of the Southern Plains.

His many books on the West and American Indians include The Sand Creek Massacre, The Peace Chiefs of the Cheyennes, and Tribal Wars of the Southern Plains.

Are you sure you want to remove Tell Them We Are Going Home from your list? . The Odyssey of the Northern Cheyennes. Published March 2001 by University of Oklahoma Press.

Are you sure you want to remove Tell Them We Are Going Home from your list? Tell Them We Are Going Home.

His other works include Massacre at Cheyenne Hole: Lieutenant Austin Henely and the Sappa Creek Controversy (1999); Colorado Profiles: Men and Women Who Shaped the Centennial State (1996, with Michael McCarthy); The Battle of Beecher Island and the Indian War of 1867–1869 (1993); and A Rocky Mountain Christmas: Yuletide Stories of the West (1987). Monnett recently spoke with Wild West about his work.

A Cheyenne warrior in every sense of the word, Morning Star was described by many writers of the century as "an admirable outlaw" compared to others . Tell Them We Are Going Home: The Odyssey of the Northern Cheyennes.

A Cheyenne warrior in every sense of the word, Morning Star was described by many writers of the century as "an admirable outlaw" compared to others like Rob Roy and William Wallace. Little Coyote (Little Wolf) and Morning Star (Dull Knife), Chiefs of the Northern Cheyennes. In 1868, Morning Star represented his tribe at the signing of the Treaty of Fort Laramie. University of Oklahoma Press. com/books?id KE-fUdZLfy8C.

Find nearly any book by John H. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Tell Them We Are Going Home: The Odyssey of the Northern Cheyennes: ISBN 9780806136455 (978-0-8061-3645-5) Softcover, University of Oklahoma Press, 2004. Where a Hundred Soldiers Were Killed: The Struggle for the Powder River Country in 1866 and the Making of the Fetterman Myth.

Tell Them We Are Going Home details the courageous journey of the Northern Cheyennes, under the leadership of Little Wolf and Dull Knife, from Indian Territory northward to their homelands in the Powder River Country. Incorporating the perspectives of the Cheyennes, the U.S. military, the Indian Bureau, and the Kansas settlers who encountered the traveling Indians, this book provides a complete account of the odyssey, along with source material never before presented in print.

The conflict between the Northern Cheyennes and the military began with the destruction of Dull Knife's winter village by cavalry troops in late 1876, at the close of the Great Sioux War. The survivors among Dull Knife's people, along with other Northern Cheyenne bands, were ordered to report to Fort Reno and the Darlington Agency in Indian Territory during the summer of 1877. Monnett describes the group's difficult seventy-day march to the agency, where the northern group began to sicken shortly after their arrival. Medical supplies were slow to arrive, and the food allotments were insufficient.

By the spring of 1878, many of the Northern Cheyennes found life in Indian Territory intolerable. They formally asked to be taken back to the higher, dry country of Montana. When their request was refused, a group of about three hundred men, women, and children slipped away from the Darlington Agency during the early morning hours of September 10, 1878, led by Little Wolf and Dull Knife.

Immediately the army marshaled the technological resources of a modern nation against them. Monnett chronicles the Cheyennes dramatic fifteen-hundred-mile trek through Kansas, Nebraska, and portions of Wyoming and Montana, which became one of the most important episodes in American history and in Cheyenne memory. Only when their plight was brought to national attention were the Northern Cheyennes officially allowed to return to their homelands and a new reservation established there for them.

Comments

Xanna Xanna
Great book!
EROROHALO EROROHALO
Well researched and enjoyable reading. Anyone interested in the American Indian story should have the information here. highly recommend.
Raelin Raelin
Slow, pensive read 3. Major reason is it is the author's parsed to his own meter the account of the "Dull Knife Raid". It should only be read cautiously, as there very many points that seem clear in the body, yet less clear in the notes, and some that definitely do NOT match the profiles of the people mentioned in his/this version. One of the best written book notation to be found. The book, which tries to NOT be objectionable to any, becomes a fairly flat read. Negatives. Repetition of the rape age summaries of white sources. These are both sensational and questionable, the simplest though it may seem a callow choice is that Cheyenne rape was on the order of 'husband high' or 'womanly attributes' and that supposed age is a nonsense category for thought for a 'savage'. Since Dull Knife (Morning Star) was a band chief his position was slightly secondary to Little Wolf (Little Coyote/Two Tails) as Sweet Medicine Chief. DK was aged and could NOT possibly have been the active participant that history has assumed in history. LW was extremely active throughout his life and a comparison with DK is that of a Mountain Lion to an very old buffalo. The use of "The Eaters" clan designation, even though reasoned in 'notation', is disturbing in that DK was essentially a Cheyenne-Sioux and not a member of the "The Eaters". The case of backward designation to supplement latter Northern Cheyenne acceptance is at best cryptic. Since, the disintegration of clan and band boundaries is apparent to all, throughout the exodus ordeal, it is hard to understand why the author did NOT concentrate on it more. For instance, in the "Lewis fight" the escapees lost considerable assets and possibly more individuals than currently estimated. The shattering of the group precipitated the Kansas raids and the 'wild' actions of the raiders can easily be understood. It is probable that this action also resulted in the younger warriors forming strong affiliations that subsumed the power of the elder Indians. Clearly, this makes more sense than to state that the Indians did themselves a disfavor in public opinion, especially since their survival was imperiled. Only afterward, did the NC placate White anger. Personally, I agree with Grinnell that LW was one of the greatest leaders in history. Though the DK faction has always had good press, DK's achievements are limited, even before his northern camp was attacked during the Great Sioux War, even there LW was beyond exemplary in his conduct. The Two Moon-Kit Fox play on power to reduce LW's position is/as mentioned easy to see, as is the DK substitution, and of course the 'great debasement' of tribal murder by LW. Still, any reader should be aware that approximately as of 1830 the Suhtai merged with the 'Tististas', who had suffered dreadfully from disease. That merger charged the Cheyenne power. I have NOT found but three persons actually mentioned as Sweet Medicine Chiefs from that time to the 1900's. They are Highbacked Wolf, Highbacked Wolf (the nephew) and Little Wolf. Even if there are others, that makes the three most important SWC's were Suhtai. That just could NOT be an accident, and given that ancestry was rigorously used to indicate which individuals could be the Arrow Keeper or the Buffalo Hat Keeper, then the historians and anthropologists have again missed a vital clue to the Cheyenne trial identity. In this book the lack of painful analysis flatlined the read. To all Americans, Darlington and Robinson should be shown for the Nazi Concentration Camp idealism that Adolf Hitler used. NOT mentioning this is a travesty of neglect. Cautionary read. Thanks, Harry!
Zadora Zadora
If you want to understand what happened in history to the Northern Cheyenne, this is the book. I bought the book to write a paper for college and it was by far the best book I found to complete my project.
Nuadabandis Nuadabandis
Some good information but writing style low-level. Overuses the word 'reimagining' which doesn't have a place in historical writing.
Marr Marr
"Tell Them We Are Going Home: The Odyssey of the Northern Cheyennes" is a solid account of the 1878 attempted exodus of about 300 Northern Cheyenne men, women and children from a reservation in the Indian Territory (Oklahoma) to their traditional homeland in the Northern Plains. The Government ordered the US Army to stop the refugees. Although author John Monnett's sympathies are openly with the Indians, he presents a balanced picture of events, recognizing that the soldiers sent in pursuit were basically men doing their duty to the best of their ability, not stereotypical villains as too often portrayed in popular media in the past few decades. Monnett also does not ignore the killing of civilian ranchers and farmers nor the rape of white women carried out by some of the young Cheyenne warriors during their trek across Kansas. In attempting to understand the motivation behind such acts, Monnett explores the traditional explanation that it was largely revenge for the killing of a group of Southern Cheyennes in the same area a few years before (this view was stressed by Mari Sandoz in her "Cheyenne Autumn" book) and casts considerable doubt on the notion. At times, Monnett veers into academic jargon (we are told that "Little Wolf died in his beloved Tongue River country, albeit reimagined according to the Euro-American vision of geographical borders") and he perhaps tries too hard to give the events great symbolic significance ("The Indians who fell in the terrible pit on Antelope Creek symbolize displaced peoples everywhere whose sense of home and desire for independence transcends the love of life"), but his book nonetheless is a readable, quite detailed narrative which ultimately remains true to the author's intent of being fair to all involved.
Inevitably, Monnet's "Tell Them We Are Going Home" must be compared to Stan Hoig's recently published "Perilous Pursuit: The U.S. Cavalry and the Northern Cheyennes" about these same events. If asked to recommend one over the other, my inclination would be to say, "Read both." Monnett and Hoig's views of the Cheyennes and their Army pursuers are much the same. Monnett's narrative perhaps contains more small details of individual experiences for a vivid story, but Hoig's book probably provides a somewhat more comprehensive picture of military operations. Neither book, unfortunately, has sufficient maps to fully follow events easily, but both contain numerous photographs of participants and locations of interest. Comparison might also be made to Mari Sandoz's "Cheyenne Autumn." However lyrically written Sandoz's book is, it cannot stand along Monnett's work (nor that of Hoig) as a reliable account of events. "Cheyenne Autumn" so closely identifies with the Indians that the white side of the story is not only inadequately presented but also distorted into almost cartoon villainy at times. "Cheyenne Autumn" is a pleasure to read, but it should not be mistaken for real history. Interestingly, in his text Monnett refers to Sandoz's book as a "novel".