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eBook On Land and Sea: Native American Uses of Biological Resources in the West Indies ePub

eBook On Land and Sea: Native American Uses of Biological Resources in the West Indies ePub

by Dr. Lee A. Newsom,Elizabeth S. Wing

  • ISBN: 081731315X
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Dr. Lee A. Newsom,Elizabeth S. Wing
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University Alabama Press (May 3, 2004)
  • Pages: 344
  • ePub book: 1184 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1420 kb
  • Other: mbr lrf lrf doc
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 156

Description

On Land and Sea examines the condition of biosystems on Caribbean islands at the time of colonization, human interactions . Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles.

On Land and Sea examines the condition of biosystems on Caribbean islands at the time of colonization, human interactions with those systems through time, and the current state of biological resources in the West Indies.

Mobile version (beta). On Land and Sea: Native American Uses of Biological Resources in the West Indies. Download (pdf, . 7 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Native American Uses of Biological Resources in the West Indies .

On Land and Sea : Native American Uses of Biological Resources in the West Indies. by Lee A. Newsom and Elizabeth S. Wing. During the vast stretches of early geologic time, the islands of the Caribbean archipelago separated from continental land masses, rose and sank many times, merged with and broke from other land masses, and then by the mid-Cenozoic period settled into the current pattern known today. By the time Native Americans arrived, the islands had developed complex, stable ecosystems.

On Land and Sea book.

On land and sea: Native American uses of biological resources in the West Indies. Native West Indian Plant Use. LA Newsom. Transoceanic drift and the domestication of African bottle gourds in the Americas. University of Alabama Press, 2004. Deciphering Holocene sea-level history on the US Gulf Coast: A high-resolution record from the Mississippi Delta. L Kistler, Á Montenegro, BD Smith, JA Gifford, RE Green, LA Newsom,. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 111 (8), 2937-2941, 2014.

During the vast stretches of early geologic time, the islands of the Caribbean archipelago separated from continental land masses, rose and sank many times, merged with and broke from other land masses, and then by the mid-Cenozoic period settled into the current pattern known today.

During the vast stretches of early geologic time, the islands of the Caribbean archipelago separated from continental land masses, rose and sank many times, merged with and broke from other land masses, and then by the mid-Cenozoic period settled into the current pattern known today Full description.

Lee A. Newsom, Elizabeth S. Wing

Lee A. On Land and Sea examines the condition of biosystems on Caribbean islands at the time of colonization, human interactions with those systems through time, and the current state of biological resources in the West Indies.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Written by Lee A. Published by: The University of Alabama Press. The actions these first colonists took on the landscape-timber clearing, cultivation, animal hunting and domestication, fishing and exploitation of reef species-affected fragile land and sea biotic communities in both beneficial and harmful ways.

British Wildlife is the leading natural history magazine in the UK, providing essential reading for both enthusiast and professional naturalists and wildlife conservationists. Subscriptions from £30 per year. Go to British Wildlife. Conservation Land Management.

During the vast stretches of early geologic time, the islands of the Caribbean archipelago separated from continental land masses, rose and sank many times, merged with and broke from other land masses, and then by the mid-Cenozoic period settled into the current pattern known today. By the time Native Americans arrived, the islands had developed complex, stable ecosystems. The actions these first colonists took on the landscape—timber clearing, cultivation, animal hunting and domestication, fishing and exploitation of reef species—affected fragile land and sea biotic communities in both beneficial and harmful ways.

On Land and Sea examines the condition of biosystems on Caribbean islands at the time of colonization, human interactions with those systems through time, and the current state of biological resources in the West Indies. Drawing on a massive data set collected from long-term archaeological research, the study reconstructs past lifeways on these small tropical islands. The work presents a wide range of information, including types of fuel and construction timber used by inhabitants, cooking techniques for various shellfish, availability and use of medicinal and ritual plants, the effects on native plants and animals of cultivation and domestication, and diet and nutrition of native populations.

The islands of the Caribbean basin continue to be actively excavated and studied in the quest to understand the earliest human inhabitants of the New World. This comprehensive work will ground current and future studies and will be valuable to archaeologists, anthropologists, botanists, ecologists, Caribbeanists, Latin American historians, and anyone studying similar island environments.