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eBook Joe Turner's Come and Gone (A Play) ePub

eBook Joe Turner's Come and Gone (A Play) ePub

by August Wilson

  • ISBN: 0573691428
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: August Wilson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: S. French (2003)
  • ePub book: 1534 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1770 kb
  • Other: docx lrf doc lrf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 807

Description

Start by marking Joe Turner's Come and Gone as Want to Read . An incredible tale of a boarding house in 1911.

Start by marking Joe Turner's Come and Gone as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Nov 22, 2016 Colleen rated it liked it. Shelves: plays. As with the first play, Gem of the Ocean, Joe Turner's Come and Gone is full of memorable characters living out their slice of African American life in 1911 Pittsburgh. The setting is a black boardinghouse run by Seth Holly and his wife, Bertha.

Joe Turner's Come and Gone is a play by American playwright August Wilson. The play was first staged 1984 at the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center in Waterford, Connecticut, and opened on Broadway on March 27, 1988, at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre-running for 105 performances.

From the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Fences comes Joe Turner's Come and Gone-Winner of the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for Best Play. The glow accompanying August Wilson's place in contemporary American theater is fixed. -Toni Morrison When Harold Loomis arrives at a black Pittsburgh boardinghouse after seven years' impressed labor on Joe Turner's chain gang, he is a free man-in body. From the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Fences comes Joe Turner's Come and Gone-Winner of the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for Best Play.

Explore the chronology of August Wilson. The setting for "Joe Turner's Come and Gone" takes place in a boarding house where owners Seth and his wife operate with strict rules for the many transients. Joe Turner is NOT a character in the play, but a man who enslaved Harold Loomis, the main character, for years. Now Loomis tries to find his wife.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Joe Turner's Come and Gone by August . From the Pulitzer Prize winning playwright of Fences and The Piano Lesson "The glow accompanying August Wilson's place in contemporary American theater is fixed.

From the Pulitzer Prize winning playwright of Fences and The Piano Lesson "The glow accompanying August Wilson's place in contemporary American theater is fixed. Toni Morrison When Harold Loomis arrives at a black Pittsburgh boardinghouse after seven years' impressed labor on Joe Turner's chain gang, he is a free man-in body.

Other Books Related to Joe Turner’s Come and Gone. When Published: The play initially debuted as a staged reading in 1984, and then appeared separately on stage in 1986, 1987, and 1988. August Wilson wrote a series of plays called The Pittsburgh Cycle. This collection of pieces-also known as The Century Cycle-consists of ten plays, all of which document the nature of African-American life in a given decade of the twentieth century. The first play that Wilson wrote in this cycle is Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, which takes place in the 1920s and is the only piece in the entire group that isn’t set in Pittsburgh. Literary Period: porary Literature.

JOE TURNER'S COME AND GONE, the second play from August Wilson's broad and fully realized "The Century Cycle," consumes the space of Open Stage o. .JOE TURNER'S COME AND GONE, the second play from August Wilson's broad and fully realized "The Century Cycle," consumes the space of Open Stage of Harrisburg, allowing audiences to take a glimpse into the African-American experience.

Joe Turner's Come and Gone, his third play, was voted best play of 1987-1988 by the New York Drama Critics' Circle. This is the second August Wilson play I've read. While not as moving as Fences, it is quite good

Joe Turner's Come and Gone, his third play, was voted best play of 1987-1988 by the New York Drama Critics' Circle. In 1990, Wilson was awarded his second Pulitzer Prize for The Piano Lesson. While not as moving as Fences, it is quite good. It ended in a surprise, if only because it seemed a little too abrupt and forced.

black American experience continued with Joe Turner’s Come and Gone, first produced in 1986, a play about the lives of residents of a boardinghouse in 1911, and The Piano Lesson, first produced in 1987, which is set in the 1930s and explores a family’s ambivalence about selling an heirloom; i. istory at your fingertips.

FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY.

Comments

Barinirm Barinirm
"Know thyself" Socrates is alleged to have said. August Wilson's _Joe Turner's Come and Gone_ makes a similar supplication. Set in 1911 Pittsburgh, Bertha and Seth Holly operate a boarding house, wanting to maintain a sense of "respectability" and not draw attention to themselves - symbolic of middle-class African-Americans, I think: enjoying their place in society, but wanting to remain below the radar of white America, lest what they have earned and have be taken from them. Bynum Walker is a neighbor of the Holly's boarding house, and is a "rootworker" - a modern day shaman, a connection to the African past ripped away from African-Americans. Between the two poles of Bynum and Seth enters Herald Loomis, a vagrant in seach of his wife who left him while he was in prison, put there by "Joe Turner."

"Joe Turner" is the Man: the system of institutional racism, of social, political and economic injustice, of American society promising opportunity with one hand while taking away any gains the underclass makes. It is Joe Turner who has imprisoned Herald Loomis, it is Joe Turner that frightens Seth Holly, it is Joe Turner that intimidates African-Americans from knowing - and celebrating - who they are, where they are from, and from realizing what they can become. It is no accident, then, that Loomis walks away from Joe Turner only with the help of Bynum: Wilson's message that only by facing the past and knowing what it has done to African-Americans can they truly know themselves and thereby become self-actualized.

I am a huge fan of Wilson's work - his century cycle is a brilliant and moving narrative of the African-American experience in the 20th century. It seems with each play of his I find a new favorite; _Joe Turner's Come and Gone_ was Wilson's favorite, and I find it difficult to disagree with him here. Highly recommended
Malaunitly Malaunitly
Wilson's vision of African Americans in the 1910s. The set is a boarding house in Pittsburgh. Assorted characters arrive and leave the boarding house, but Joe Turner is not one of them. The owner of the boarding house is suspicious of his boarders, but he wants to make money. Some of the characters are ex-slaves, others, progeny of ex-slaves--all living in Jim Crow America. One young man has escaped chain gangs in the South. Loomis (the protagonist) arrives with his daughter--they are looking for his runaway wife. Wilson gives this play a more African ambiance with witch doctor incantations and rituals and juba dancing and singing. Late in the play we learn that Joe Turner is not a character in the play, but a character in a song "Joe Turner's Come and Gone." Joe Turner is the fugitive-slave catcher of antebellum days--a symbol of the white man's oppression. The message of the play: fellows, let go of the past; it's over. Don't fear the white man; better days are coming, so find your song and live it.
Zan Zan
Herald Loomis says this to his estranged wife in the final scene of this play, set in a 1911 Pittsburgh boarding house. It's a stunning rejection of religion from Herald, who is exhausted from hearing about how God will reward blacks in the afterlife as long as they stay meek in this one.

The play was first performed in 1986, and it is part of August Wilson's ten-play tetracycle about African-Americans in Pittsburgh during each decade of the 20th century.

Charles S. Dutton and Delroy Lindo played the role of Herald Loomis in the early productions of this play. Loomis is a 32 year old man who is looking for his wife, whom he lost touch with after he was put on Joe Turner's chain gain in Memphis for seven years.

Seth Holly is the 50 year old owner of the boarding house in which Loomis and his daughter stay (along with Holly's wife and a number of other residents). Seth is both practical and skeptical (of people, banks and society): "Anybody liable to do anything far as I'm concerned." (2.1)

It's a story about identity and relationships. Bynum, the 60 year old mystic who lives in the house, sums it up well: "Seem like everybody looking for something."

Herald Loomis is looking for himself.
Kulafyn Kulafyn
Joe Turner is the weakest of the three Wilson plays I have read. A lot of it is overcooked and there are allusions to history that I did not know, and when I looked them up I can say that Wilson missed a fantastic chance at illuminating an important time in African American history (as he does in Ma Rainey and Fences). I thought the lay out was too contrived: various characters with different backgrounds and from around the country meet up in a Pittsburgh boarding house -all seems too convenient for good writing. Bynum, the conjurer, is given the roll of handing down ages of traditional wisdom, and it is he who leads Loomis (a victim of Joe Turner's oppression) in a personal revival to rediscover his identity. What is missing throughout the play is the background of the title, and this is too bad because there lies the authentic, human element that Wilson is trying to capture. Only after looking online did I discover that Joe Turner was based on a real brother of a governor, who would set up the newly freed slaves on minor crimes (such as gambling) and while transporting them between prisons, he would drop them off in territory unfamiliar to the "convicts" where they would essentially be indentured servants for seven years. Without knowing this underhanded slave system, it is hard for a reader (or audience) to really grasp how oppression was happening, and it is the how part that creates complexity. Newly "freed" people facing new means of maintaining something as close to slavery as possible, which changes the face of the social experiences that Wilson is trying to convey in his drama. It reads all too much of a man in the 1980s trying to find his own identity through historical characters, who no doubt faced oppression and identity issues themselves, but not identically to a man in the late 20th century. I would reccomend many other stories (by Wilson and other authors) about people facing oppression in the US before this one.
Malalrajas Malalrajas
for school
Quphagie Quphagie
Awesome play. Easy reading puts you right there!
wanderpool wanderpool
Enjoying it.
I was told there was a meaning in this story and there was.