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eBook Crime and Modernization: The Impact of Industrialization and Urbanization on Crime (SCIENCE AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS) ePub

eBook Crime and Modernization: The Impact of Industrialization and Urbanization on Crime (SCIENCE AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS) ePub

by Dr. Louise I. Shelley Ph.D.

  • ISBN: 0809309831
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Dr. Louise I. Shelley Ph.D.
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Southern Illinois University Press; 1st edition (March 2, 1981)
  • Pages: 208
  • ePub book: 1797 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1174 kb
  • Other: docx doc azw mbr
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 299

Description

by Dr. Louise I. Shelley P.

by Dr. Shelley’s findings are that the observed crime patterns in any country are a logical response to changing social conditions. Thus the future state of criminality can be predicted. This valuable analysis of significant criminological theories will be useful for academic and large public libraries. Shelley is Assistant Professor of Criminology at the School of Justice, American University. Series: SCIENCE AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS.

Crime in Socialist countries. - Conclusion: modernization and crime.

- Crime in developed countries. - Part 3. Crime under Socialism. - Crime in Socialist countries.

Home Browse Books Book details, Crime and Modernization: The .

Home Browse Books Book details, Crime and Modernization: The Impact o. .By Louise I. Shelley.

Crime and Modernization book. In this book Shelley provides both historical and contemporary perspectives from which to view the impact of the developmental process on levels and forms of criminality.

In this pioneering analysis of the influence exerted by modernization and socioeconomic evolution on patterns of crime, criminologist Louise I. Shelley asserts, Society gets the type and level of criminality its conditions produce.

The effects of modernization on crime in Middletown, 1845–1910.

The effects of modernization on crime in Middletown, 1845–1910. Authors and affiliations. Carbondale, Illinois: Southern Illinois University Press, 1981.

Translated into Chinese, published Bejing: Public Publishing House, 1987.

In this pioneering analysis of the influence exerted by moderni­zation and socioeconomic evolution on patterns of crime, crim­inologist Louise I. Shelley asserts, “Society gets the type and level of criminality its conditions produce.”

 

Shelley investigates crime patterns in undeveloped capitalist countries, in developed capitalist countries, and in Socialist countries. Her study is unique in that she alone synthesizes his­torical accounts of crime and civil disorder with the literature of modern urban studies and contemporary criminality. Through her cross-cultural and historical approach she demonstrates that contrary to what seems apparent, the global profile of crime is not that of a maniacal pillaging monster. The monster is sane. Crime patterns are predictable. By analyzing the criminal population, recent crime trends, the impact of the criminal jus­tice system, and the predominant values of society, Shelley makes informed predictions concerning the future state of criminality.

 

Shelley addresses six issues. She considers ways in which modernization has affected rates of crime during the initial and later stages of a society’s development. She asks how moderni­zation affects the rates of occurrence of fundamental forms of crime. Another question is whether development changes the relationship between crimes against property and crimes of vio­lence against people. Does the speed of the transition from un­developed to developed society alter observable patterns of be­havior? And finally, does modernization change the nature of the criminal population?

 

In this book Shelley provides both historical and contempo­rary perspectives from which to view the impact of the develop­mental process on levels and forms of criminality. She synthe­sizes the large body of literature aimed at measuring the extent to which socioeconomic development produces similar changes in culturally distinct and geographically separated nations.