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eBook Airbrushed Nation ePub

eBook Airbrushed Nation ePub

by Jennifer Nelson

  • ISBN: 1580054137
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Jennifer Nelson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Seal Press (October 30, 2012)
  • Pages: 267
  • ePub book: 1665 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1344 kb
  • Other: txt lrf rtf docx
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 826

Description

As Jennifer Nelson argued more recently, in her 2012 book, Airbrushed Nation, chick slicks are the publications we love and loathe.

As Jennifer Nelson argued more recently, in her 2012 book, Airbrushed Nation, chick slicks are the publications we love and loathe. The further we get into the pages of these magazines, she writes in the introduction, explaining her own push-and-pull attraction to the glossies, the experience often feels less like an easy escape and more like a passport to slow-creeping angst. OPINION: Layoffs, reduced print runs, and total shutdowns - 2018 has been a rocky year for women-focused publications. But that may be a good thing, writes Lauren McKeon. December 14, 2018 ·. Airbrushed Nation added a button to help you learn more about them.

In Airbrushed Nation, Jennifer Nelson-a longtime industry insider-exposes the naked truth behind the glossy pages of women’s magazines, both good and bad. Nelson delves deep into the world o. . Nelson delves deep into the world of.Jennifer Nelson has been writing for women's magazines for nearly fifteen years. She's written hundreds of articles on health, wellness, relationships, pop culture, pets, and travel for practically every chick slick on the stands, including Woman’s Day, Ladies’ Home Journal, Family Circle, Cosmo, O, The Oprah Magazine, Glamour, Women’s Health, Fitness, and Self.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. Glamour.

In Airbrushed Nation, Jennifer Nelson-a longtime industry insider-exposes the naked truth behind the glossy pages . Nelson delves deep into the world of glossies, explaining the ways in which these magazines have been positive for women, highlighting the ways in which their agendas have been misguided, and asking the questions that have long gone unasked: What do women think and believe about the retouched photos, the ubiquitous sex advice, the constant offensive on aging, and the fantasy fashion spreads.

Airbrushed Nation book. In Airbrushed Nation, Jennifer Nelson-a longtime industry insider-exposes the naked truth behind the glossy pages of women’s magazines, both good and bad.

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This book by Jennifer Nelson dissects the women's mag industry and confirms what any thinking woman has suspected for years: It's all smoke and mirrors

This book by Jennifer Nelson dissects the women's mag industry and confirms what any thinking woman has suspected for years: It's all smoke and mirrors. And very, very sexist, but in a way that makes it look like they're really feminists. I loved reading this and was particularly fascinated at how they manipulate photos.

Город: Neptune Beach, FLПодписчиков: 3 ты. себе: freelance content marketing writer/ghost. себе: freelance content marketing ebMD, AARP, HGTV. Airbrushed Nation: The Lure & Loathing of Women's Magazines/ wannabe interior design goddess

In Airbrushed Nation, Jennifer Nelson-a longtime industry insider-exposes the naked truth behind the glossy pages of women’s magazines, both good and bad. Airbrushed Nation by Jennifer Nelson (design: Erin Seaward-Hiatt)

In Airbrushed Nation, Jennifer Nelson-a longtime industry insider-exposes the naked truth behind the glossy pages of women’s magazines, both good and bad. Airbrushed Nation by Jennifer Nelson (design: Erin Seaward-Hiatt). Jennifer Nelson, author of "Airbrushed Nation," reveals the damaging effects women's magazines have on all of us. Airbrushed Nation: The Lure and Loathing of Women's Magazines - Product Description: Glamour. Ladies’ Home Journal. In an industry that has been in a do.

Glamour. Cosmo. SELF. Ladies’ Home Journal. Vogue. In an industry that has been in a downward spiral for years, these magazines—and other women—focused magazines like them—have not only retained their readership, they’ve increased it. Every month, five million-plus women peel back the slick cover of their favorite magazine to thumb through pages filled with tidings and advice about fashion, beauty, sex, relationships, dieting, health, and lifestyle. But do women’s magazines offer valuable information, or do they merely peddle fluff and fantasy—and in either case, do women take their messages to heart?In Airbrushed Nation, Jennifer Nelson—a longtime industry insider—exposes the naked truth behind the glossy pages of women’s magazines, both good and bad. Nelson delves deep into the world of glossies, explaining the ways in which these magazines have been positive for women, highlighting the ways in which their agendas have been misguided, and asking the questions that have long gone unasked: What do women think and believe about the retouched photos, the ubiquitous sex advice, the constant offensive on aging, and the fantasy fashion spreads featuring unaffordable clothing and accessories? Do the unrealistic ads, images, and ideals that permeate glossies damage women’s self-esteem . . . and is it intentional?

Comments

Bralore Bralore
When I was in my 20s I looked forward to picking up my copy of Cosmo every month. I did the quizzes, read about how to become irresistible to men and followed the suggested beauty tips with religious fervor. Then, in my 30s and entering motherhood, I switched from Cosmo to Women's Day and Family Circle. My forties widened the door to Good Housekeeping and Ladies Home Journal, with a touch of More thrown in for good measure. And one day, like everyone else who reads these magazines, I discovered that they said the same things over and over and over again. How to walk off the weight; how to please your man; how to get one in the first place; how to raise healthy, confident kids; etc, etc. Over time, the long narrative stories involving women who were a lot like me gave way to celebrity worship and information presented in little bits and bites as if I were too stupid to remain interested in anything longer than 300 words. The clothes were always out of reach (Hey editors, do you really think the average soccer mom is paying $695 for a dress to wear to the office????) and the women were all flawless: No wrinkles, no frizzy hair, no midriff bulge, perfect teeth -- the whole nine yards of perfection. I finally figured out that the whole genre of women's magazines were really fairy tales in disguise. This book by Jennifer Nelson dissects the women's mag industry and confirms what any thinking woman has suspected for years: It's all smoke and mirrors. And very, very sexist, but in a way that makes it look like they're really feminists. I loved reading this and was particularly fascinated at how they manipulate photos. The little boxed asides are witty and interesting, too. It's one of those books that will make you read your favorite magazine from a completely different point of view, and a mesmerizing read that will keep you riveted from beginning to end. I suggest on ordering take-out before you open this book because you won't want to stop once you start.
Conjuril Conjuril
Like the author, I started out reading Tiger Beat and Young Miss and considered myself a magazine junkie by the time I was 12. I then graduated to Teen, then Seventeen. I waited until I turned 17 before reading Seventeen. I purchased the bridal magazines when I got married (both times), and let the pages of Cosmo dictate my life until my first baby was born and my life was run by Parents, Parenting, American Baby, and Mothering. Now I have one teenager still at home and my three oldest children are adults and I find myself reading Woman's Day, Good Housekeeping, MORE, and AARP as I reached the big 50. After reading this book, I now laugh when I see the perfume strips in magazines. I am a big fan of Dove's real woman advertising compaign and glad to see it mentioned more than once in this book. Although I am and always will be a magazine junkie, I have a problem with the unrealistic look of the models in the magazines, and think that airbrushing is a shameful act. Everyone who reads women's magazines will see them differently and make more educated purchasing choices if they read this book. Great job!
Hidden Winter Hidden Winter
Like author Jennifer Nelson, I was a women's magazine junkie. When I started freelancing, I broke in with women's and fitness mags, and was thrilled to see my name in print in some of my favorite magazines. As time went on, though, I began to question some of the work I was doing, and the editorial process overall. Airbrushed Nation captures the conundrum I (and many other freelancers) face--is it worth it to write for magazines that exist mainly to make women feel bad about themselves (or at least make them believe that they must improve themselves)? But the book goes beyond that question and exposes what really goes on behind the scenes, both good (educating women about important health and social issues, and encouraging them to pursue their goals and dreams) and bad (e.g., the emphasis on external beauty and its pursuit). Whether you love women's magazines, write for them, or simply want to know more about this powerful media influence, Airbrushed Nation is an eye-opening, smart, entertaining read.
Saberdragon Saberdragon
In the late 1950's, my first encounter with women's magazines was my grandmother's McCall's. In the late '60's I began reading Teen and Seventeen, moving on to the "seven sisters" described by the author. The long fictional stories and informative articles gave way to a predictable monthly fare of diet, relationship, fashion, beauty and recipe bytes. Not realizing why, I began to wonder if there was something wrong with me after reading an issue. Was I thin enough? Was I beautiful enough? Was I doing enough to keep my marriage happy? Was I preparing healthy, appetizing meals? Was I ignoring potential deadly hazards in my home or neighborhood? Was I a good mother? Jennifer Nelson peels back the layers and reveals fuzzy line between editors and advertisers as they manipulate women by instilling insecurities about themselves, knowing that they will be more likely to buy diet aids, beauty products and the latest fashions advertised in the magazine. From truth in advertising to the feminine fear factor this in depth book is a must read!
wanderpool wanderpool
Jennifer Nelson did an excellent job exposing the downside of the women's magazine industry, yet she also is fair and balanced and acknowledges the many good things about the magazines. As a writer myself, I have second thoughts about trying to break into these magazines given what I now know about what really goes on. And though I will continue as a voracious reader of these magazines, I now will look at them through new, enlightened eyes, thanks to Jennifer's research that points out many very-true things the reader might not notice. Thanks for a great work, Jen!
Daron Daron
I am still reading, but so far I love her style and will no doubt recommend this to many people. My teenage daughter is also reading it and is learning a few things I already learned long ago. Maybe she'll think I'm smarter reading it from someone else!