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eBook Akenfield ePub

eBook Akenfield ePub

by Ronald Blythe

  • ISBN: 0140034617
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Ronald Blythe
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin UK; New Ed edition (January 4, 1972)
  • Pages: 336
  • ePub book: 1323 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1933 kb
  • Other: lit lrf txt lit
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 822

Description

RONALD BLYTHE was born in 1922 in Suffolk, England, where his family has lived for centuries. Portrait of an English Village. Introduction by. MATT WEILAND.

RONALD BLYTHE was born in 1922 in Suffolk, England, where his family has lived for centuries.

It is a captivating book which, if it has a message, might well be "Anthropology begins at home. Here is testament that one needn't travel to Sumatra or New Guinea or some such place to discover foreign attitudes, outlandish practices or fascinating rites.

He writes a long-running and considerably praised weekly column in the Church Times entitled Word from Wormingford.

The book can also be heartbreaking, full of loneliness and Ronald Blythe's 'strange journey to a familiar land' is an oral history classic. Written more than 40 years ago, it still seems quite fresh. It is prescient - documenting the beginnings of factory farming and monoculture.

Ronald Blythe’s wonderful book raises enduring questions about the relations between memory and modernity .

Ronald Blythe’s wonderful book raises enduring questions about the relations between memory and modernity, nature and human nature, silence and speech. Woven from the words of the inhabitants of a small Suffolk village in the 1960s, Akenfield is a masterpiece of twentieth-century English literature, a scrupulously observed and deeply affecting portrait of a place and people and a now vanished way of life. Ronald Blythe’s wonderful book raises enduring questions about the relations between memory and modernity, nature and human nature, silence and speech.

Woven from the words of the inhabitants of a small Suffolk village in the 1960s, Akenfield is a masterpiece of twentieth-century English literature, a scrupulously observed and deeply affecting portrait of a place and people and a now vanished way of life. Ronald Blythe's wonderful book raises enduring questions about the relations between memory and modernity, nature and human nature, silence and speech.

Music inspired by the book: 'Akenfield' by Robert Blythe. Music compiled by Joachim Stoop Book translated in Dutch and published by Lebowski Publishers. More from Booksounds.

The best-selling book that resulted captured the changing nature of English rural life, and it has remained in print in England ever since as a Penguin Modern Classic.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Comments

Westened Westened
Ronald Blythe, the describer and recorder of these village voices, from 1967-1969 in Akenfield likens it to "making a strange journey to a familiar land" since he himself is a native of Suffolk in East Anglia. It is a captivating book which, if it has a message, might well be "Anthropology begins at home." Here is testament that one needn't travel to Sumatra or New Guinea or some such place to discover foreign attitudes, outlandish practices or fascinating rites. Simply take a stroll down the street on which you live and get people to talk, to express themselves, which is not an easy thing, wherever one goes.

I think for this review, I'll simply follow Blythe's example and let the people do the talking:

Poet:

"Although you may not be capable of loving your neighbour as yourself, you can at least know him as well as you know yourself."

Resettled Scotsman:

"The big skies leave the East Anglians empty. The skies are nothing. The horizons are too wide. There is nothing for a man to measure himself by here."

Schoolmaster:

"Perhaps I'm too contented. Perhaps I lack a demon. Life just charms me - how daft can you get? I worry about this."

These are but random snippets. But, suffice it to say, once you are carried along through this book, you'll emerge from it suffused with a deep, instinctual feeling of knowing a place and its people as they existed 46-48 years ago, as of this review. It's a grand achievement, this book.
Burgas Burgas
amazing insight into the revolutionary changes afoot in rural Britain in late 1960's where the cultural/sexual/industrial/popular shifts were slow to bite and devastating in the shades/effects of change they wrought. Truly fascinating first-person lucid and tangible stories across all classes. A MUST for anyone seeking revelation about what the WW2 generation thought of the 'yoof' of the 1960's, and vice-versa. A BBC movie was made in the 1960's and has recently been digitally restored by the British Film Institute. The book is BOUND to be waaay better and more details. You can literally taste these people's lives from the pages.
Fonceiah Fonceiah
Ethnography with a Heart for England, its villages and people. Set in 1967, shows how times were changing middle of last century, village to suburb, farming to manufacturing, walking or riding and talking to driving, TV, more individualism, hard-times to consumerism. Interesting given our changes now due to the internet and technology.
Adrielmeena Adrielmeena
An absolutely charming read, written in the words (except no doubt for some editorial shaping) of English villagers nearing the end of an era (actually the 19th century). I enjoyed the follow-up 2006 book, "Return to Akenfield," just as much.
Mysterious Wrench Mysterious Wrench
Akenfield folk exceeded my expectations. The stories will remain with me for years to come. Innocent, naive, beyond hardworking, full of pride and integrity, they knew little of rest or entertainment, but knew satisfaction. A dear story of a period long gone.
Mejora Mejora
Extremely interesting and moving account of the massive changes that have occurred in rural England over the past hundred years. The insights provided by this book have wide application in our strange and scary world. John Bate
Gold Crown Gold Crown
Nice description of communities that were changing in East Angelia and Suffolk.
My mother turned me on to this book, and in turn I purchased it for my girls...a wonderful true story of life in a village from a different era. Wish I could time travel back there. As I can't I'll just have to re-read the book!