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eBook Gentleman Gerald: The Crimes and Times of Gerald Chapman America's First Public Enemy No. 1 ePub

eBook Gentleman Gerald: The Crimes and Times of Gerald Chapman America's First Public Enemy No. 1 ePub

by H. P. Jeffers

  • ISBN: 0312135009
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: H. P. Jeffers
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: St Martins Pr; 1st edition (December 1, 1995)
  • Pages: 249
  • ePub book: 1854 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1135 kb
  • Other: rtf doc azw lrf
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 649

Description

Jeffers, H. Paul (Harry Paul), 1934-.

Jeffers, H. ENCRYPTED DAISY download. For print-disabled users.

Gerald Chapman was born George Chartres in August 1887 to parents of Irish heritage. Arrested for the first time in 1902 at age fourteen, Chapman was incarcerated for most of his early adult life. While serving time for bank robbery, he was transferred from Sing Sing to Auburn State Prison, and became acquainted with highly educated Danish-born con man George. Jeffers, H. Paul (1993), Gentleman Gerald: The Crimes and Times of Gerald Chapman, America's First "Public Enemy N. ", St. Martin's Press, ISBN 978-0-312-13500-3. Executions in Connecticut Since 1894". Connecticut State Library.

Gentleman Gerald book.

book by H. Paul Jeffers.

Gerald Chapman became America’s first celebrity gangster and its first Public Enemy No. 1. President Coolidge pardoned him from the Federal charges against him so that the State of Connecticut could hang him. by Robert Walsh

Gerald Chapman became America’s first celebrity gangster and its first Public Enemy No. by Robert Walsh. Death itself isn’t dreadful, but hanging seems an awkward way of ending the adventure. – Gerald Chapman to his lawyers after being sentenced to death for murder in 1925. We’ll call him Gerald Chapman as that was his favourite alias.

Crimes and times of Gerald Chapman, America's first "public enemy no. 1". Classifications. 36. /523/092, B. Library of Congress.

The description of Chapman as ""America's first Public Enemy No. 1"" is misleading; he was not the first FBI ""most wanted"" but simply the first criminal to be so called in print. Although he made a couple of interesting escapes, he was not clever enough to avoid getting captured with head-spinning frequency. Faced with significant gaps in the documentary record, and perhaps needing to liven up an otherwise uninspiring story, Jeffers pads the book with invented scenes and hackneyed dialogue ("" 'Finding one check passer in this town.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

America's First "Public Enemy (1) biography (1) Biography & Autobiography (1) Biography - General (1) crime (1) history (1) PI (1) true crime (1). refresh. Member recommendations. No current Talk conversations about this book. Prisoners and detainees of New York. Prisoners and detainees of the United States federal government. Escapees from United States federal government detention. Deaths by firearm in Michigan.

America's First "Public Enemy No. Publisher: St. Martin's Press, 1st printing. Anyway, Jeffers restores our first "Public Enemy No. 1" to his original status. From Booklist: Crime biography fans weary of today's d-Uzis gangsters and their attendant brutalities and gaucheries well may turn to an earlier age when extreme felons were suitably dignified if no less ruthless-to Gerald Chapman, the subject of Jeffers' fine popular life, for instance. Chapman's heyday was the 1920s.

The story of notorious criminal Gerald Chapman is set against the colorful background of the Jazz Age and follows his daring exploits, including the biggest mail truck stickup in history, his brazen daylight robberies, and sensationalized trial.

Comments

Otiel Otiel
This was a wonderful book about the exploits of a criminal, Gerald Chapman, who lived in the early part of the 20th century and has the distinct bragging rites to being called "Public Enemy No.1". Not by the FBI, actually, but by the press.
The story is well written and reads much more like a crime novel than a work of non-fiction. It covers the life of Chapman and explores his exploits in crime. And, what exploits they were! If there was a crime available to commit, he gave it a try.
It's really a shame the book is out of print. If you can find one, buy it and enjoy!!
Yalone Yalone
A day at the library looking up backdate newspapers would have yielded a wealth of information about Chapman not included it. The dialogue put in the characters' mouths by the author is stiff and embarrassing, and doesn't belong in a work of non-fiction, anyway. The book seems heavily indebted to Robert Hayden Alcorn's earlier Chapman bio, "The Count of Gramercy Park." Some material, such as the details of Chapman's escape from the Georgia prison hospital, appear to be completely fabricated. This is not biography, nor is it honest.