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eBook Information and Secrecy : Vannevar Bush, Ultra, and the Other Memex ePub

eBook Information and Secrecy : Vannevar Bush, Ultra, and the Other Memex ePub

by Colin Burke,Michael Buckland

  • ISBN: 0810827832
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Colin Burke,Michael Buckland
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Scarecrow Press (June 1, 1994)
  • Pages: 466
  • ePub book: 1602 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1349 kb
  • Other: rtf mbr lrf lrf
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 301

Description

Washington University) is an historian and educator who has written on American social history, the history of higher education, quantitative methods and the history of computers. He has received awards from, among others, the SSRC and the Spencer Foundation. He was the senior Fulbright scholar in Poland during the fall of Communism and has acted as a consultant to government agencies. It could have turned out differently.

Information and Secrecy book. Colin B. Burke is the author of several works on information and intelligence history, including Information and Secrecy: Vannevar Bush, Ultra, and the Other Memex and The Secret in Building 26. Written for the general reader, Burke's volume provides the first. He lives in Maryland. Books by Colin B. Burke

Vannevar Bush is a central figure in this book, but the book is more about the events surrounding information machine development during . Burke shows us how those events were influenced by Bush despite his many failures.

Vannevar Bush is a central figure in this book, but the book is more about the events surrounding information machine development during Bush's years of influence than it is about Bush the man or Bush the engineer. He acknowledgesBush's greatnessearly in the book. VannevarBush of the Massa- chusetts Instituteof Technology was one of the outstanding academicengineers of his time.

Posttruth, Truthiness, and Alternative Facts: Information Behavior and Critical Information Consumption for a New Age. Cooke

Posttruth, Truthiness, and Alternative Facts: Information Behavior and Critical Information Consumption for a New Age. Cooke. Using Technology to Support Equity and Inclusion in Youth Library Programming: Current Practices and Future Opportunities. Subramaniam et al. Queering the Catalog: Queer Theory and the Politics of Correction. Teaching to Dismantle White Supremacy in Archives.

Vannevar Bush, Ultra, and the other Memex. Published 1994 by Scarecrow Press in Metuchen, . Includes bibliographical references (p. 377-450) and index.

Information and Secrecy: Vannevar Bush, Ultra, and the Other Memex. In Information and Intrigue Colin Burke tells the story of one man's plan to revolutionize the world's science information systems and how science itself became enmeshed with ideology and th. More)

Information and Secrecy: Vannevar Bush, Ultra, and the Other Memex. Burke, Michael K. Buckland. From the Publisher: Written for the general reader, Burke's volume provides the first view of the relationships among America's librarians, cryptanalysts and educators as they created informatio. More). Scarecrow Press, 1994. Librarians Go High-Tech, Perhaps: The Ford Foundation, the CLR, and INTREX. Libraries and Culture 31:1 (winter 1996). Atlantic Monthly, July 1945.

Buckland, Michael Keeble (April 2006). Emanuel Goldberg and his knowledge machine: information, invention, and political forces. Information and Secrecy: Vannevar Bush, Ultra and the other Memex. Greenwood Publishing Group. ISBN 978-0-313-31332-5. Retrieved 11 October 2011. The Kinamo camera, Emanuel Goldberg, and Joris Ivens. Film History 20 (1) (2008): 49-58. edu/journals/film history/v020/20.

Burke, Colin . Buckland, Michael K. (1994). Information and Secrecy: Vannevar Bush, Ultra, and the Other Memex. Campbell-Kelly, Martin; Croarken, Mary; Flood, Raymond; Robson, Elanor (2003). The History of Mathematical Tables: From Sumer to Spreadsheets. Chandler, Alfred Dupont; Cortada, James W. (ed.

Written for the general reader, Burke's volume provides the first view of the relationships among America's librarians, cryptanalysts and educators as they created information science, computerized codebreaking, and the modern research university. Using hundreds of primary and secret documents and more than twenty illustrations to trace the careers of Vannevar Bush of MIT and the navy's codebreaking agency, OP-20-G, Burke shows how the lack of coherent American science and intelligence policies led to the tangled lives of two proto-computers that were the world's first electronic data-processing machines. The histories of Bush's Memex-like microfilm Rapid Selector for the American Documentalists and his Comparator for those who created the nation's Ultra Bombe and RAM machines began in the early 1930s and suffered through a generation of struggles with intransigent technologies, policy conflicts with the British over the control of signals-intelligence and the unwillingness of America to develop information and intelligence technologies until the Cold War turned to science and the library to fulfill defense needs. Now, as the United States is on the verge of investing billions of dollars in information highways while reducing its intelligence capabilities, the tragedy of Bush's machines warns against information scientists putting technology ahead of logic and of the dangers of the nation returning to isolationism. Indexed and with extensive endnotes which serve the bibliographic function.

Comments

IWAS IWAS
I knew I would appreciate this book when I read the last sentence of its preface, which revealed unequivocally that the author was above all else a serious, thoroughly dedicated historian. After reading it, I've loaned my copy to friends and convinced others to buy copies, and without exception all who read it agreed that it was an impressive book that uncovered changed the way they saw important past events.

The book includes a survey of scientific research in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as sponsored by industry, government, and academia, revealing that WWII was pivotal in shaping today's research. It could have turned out differently. The major focus of the book is on the astonishing classified work before, during, and just after that war on advanced optomechanical machines for cryptanalysis and information retrieval. Because Bush inspired many computer scientists and because approaches to building information retrieval systems are arguably even more important today, it is well worth understanding what really happened then.

Another element to this story is that of the people involved, including the brilliant engineers who worked for decades on these machines. I would encourage any young researcher or engineer to read this book carefully. Too much of what they are exposed to consists of reverse-engineered success cases. This description of systems that did not ultimately succeed should prompt anyone to more thoughtful consideration of the possibilities that lie ahead in their career.

The book would benefit from a timeline of events -- I constructed one as I went -- and some minor editing. I hope it is republished as it is out of print; until then look for it in a library or pick up the occasional used copy that surfaces.
Obong Obong
Burke deserves terrific credit for detailed research into an untold story about several projects to invent computing machines useful for communications codebreaking and other national defense purposes, during World War II. This story is valuable for computer history and for insights into a little known aspect of U.S. military history. The book is painstakingly documented.

With careful attention to arcane topics, the book is not an easy read and might not appeal to many general readers. It has a narrow focus on several developmental computer projects. However, for those interested in the historical evolution of computing machines and signals intelligence, the book may be rewarding.

Owing to the technological difficulty of these computer development projects and modest resources for them, it is not surprising problems were encountered. Based on this context, the author under-appreciates Vannevar Bush, who was involved in spawning these projects. In a bigger picture, Bush rendered extraordinary service to the United States during World War II, as leader of the National Defense Research Council, which harnessed the inventiveness of civilian scientists in meeting the technological imperatives of the war. Bush was a great inventor and scientific leader. Burke would surely have been helped had Pascal Zachary's fine biography of Bush, Endless Frontier (1997), then been available to him.

Nevertheless, Burke's book represents valuable primary research on computer history and signals intelligence. The author devoted years to researching this book. In so doing, he has rendered highly valuable service to the understanding of history. His book sheds interesting light on the dogged efforts of many Americans involved in cryptological causes and in computer development. This underlying story is intrinsically inspiring and now better revealed.
Nargas Nargas
If you're interested in the evolution of computing in the early days of the U.S. military Cryptanalysis you need to have this book on your shelf. The author is clearly a great researcher. And the book gives tantalizing hints about systems not mentioned anywhere else.

But at least at the time he wrote this book, he was unable to put together a coherent narrative. There are multiple stories being told here - none of them coherently. And I'm not convinced the author actually understood computer architecture or cryptography - a handicap in tackling this subject.

I only wish he could go back and rewrite this.