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eBook STILL LIFE WITH RICE ePub

eBook STILL LIFE WITH RICE ePub

by Helie Lee

  • ISBN: 0684827115
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Helie Lee
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Scribner; Reprint edition (April 8, 1997)
  • Pages: 320
  • ePub book: 1485 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1639 kb
  • Other: lit doc txt lrf
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 610

Description

Still Life, With Rice is a beautiful depiction of the Korean woman. Helie Lee introduces us to a Korean-American female narrator who is unaware of the power behind her culture. She views her mother and grandmother as coming from the "old-school," thus defying her Korean identity

Still Life, With Rice is a beautiful depiction of the Korean woman. She views her mother and grandmother as coming from the "old-school," thus defying her Korean identity. On a trip to Korea, our narrator begins a journey to awakening, which we, as readers feel because Lee then transforms the narration to that of our narrator's grandmother. We live through the grandmother's life from childhood, through marriage, children, the Korean War, love, loss, wealth, despair,.

Still Life With Rice is a novel written by Helie Lee, and published in 1997 by Simon & Schuster. Although it is written by Helie Lee, the book is mostly written from the viewpoint of Lee's grandmother, Hongyong Baek. In the book, Lee expresses her annoyance for the way her mother and grandmother think she is too Americanized, and should be more Korean In the Absence of Sun. In her second book, In the Absence of Sun(1998), Lee recounts.

Still Life With Rice book. Helie Lee’s grandmother, Hongyong Baek, came of age in a unified but socially repressive Korea, where she was taught the roles that had been prescribed for her: obedient daughter, demure wife, efficient household manager. Ripped from her home first during the Japanese occupation and again during the bloody civil war that divided her country, Hongyong fought to save her family by drawing from her own talents and values.

In this radiant memoir of her grandmother's life, Helie Lee probes a history and a culture that are both seductively exotic and strangely familiar. And with wit and verve she claims her own Korean identity, illuminating the intricate experiences of Asian-American women.

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Still Life with Rice : A Young American Woman Discovers the Life and Legacy of Her Korean Grandmother.

320 pages ; 24 cm. In this radiant memoir of her grandmother's life, Helie Lee probes a history and a culture that are both seductively exotic and strangely familiar. Born in 1912 - "the year of the rat" - to aristocratic parents, Hongyong Baek came of age in a unified but socially repressive Korea, where she learned the roles that had been prescribed for her: obedient daughter, demure wife, efficient household manager.

Helie Lee is the author of the bestseller Still Life With Rice (Scribner 1996), and In The Absence of Sun (Harmony Books 2002), memoirs in which she chronicles her family’s experience in war-torn Korea from the 1930s to 1997

Helie Lee is the author of the bestseller Still Life With Rice (Scribner 1996), and In The Absence of Sun (Harmony Books 2002), memoirs in which she chronicles her family’s experience in war-torn Korea from the 1930s to 1997. In The Absence of Sun specifically details her risky attempt to rescue her uncle from North Korea. Inspired by her courageous story, Cosmopolitan Magazine selected Lee as a Freedom Fighter out of thousands of women nominated for their "1999 Fun Fearless Female" competition. Born in Seoul, Korea, Lee’s family immigrated to America when she was four.

Helie Lee is a Korean American writer and university lecturer who has also made a documentary film. Helie’s mission became even more urgent when she realized that her first book, the bestselling novel Still Life with Rice, about the family’s escape, might have angered the North Korean government and put her uncle in danger.

Helie Lee’s grandmother, Hongyong Baek, came of age in a unified but socially repressive Korea, where she was taught the roles that had been prescribed for her: obedient daughter, demure wife, efficient household manager. Ripped from her home first during the Japanese occupation and again during the bloody civil war that divided her country, Hongyong fought to save her family by drawing from her own talents and values

“A captivating memoir of a courageous survivor” (Publishers Weekly) and “a window onto the panorama of modern Korean history” (St. Petersburg Times) this is a radiant and engaging story about a young American woman’s discovery about the life of her Korean grandmother.Helie Lee’s grandmother, Hongyong Baek, came of age in a unified but socially repressive Korea, where she was taught the roles that had been prescribed for her: obedient daughter, demure wife, efficient household manager. Ripped from her home first during the Japanese occupation and again during the bloody civil war that divided her country, Hongyong fought to save her family by drawing from her own talents and values. Over the years she proved her spirit indomitable, providing for her husband children by running a successful restaurant, building a profitable opium business, and eventually becoming adept at the healing art of ch’iryo. When she was forced to leave her country, she moved her family to California, where she reestablished her ch’iryo practice. Writing in her grandmother’s voice, Helie Lee recreates an individual experience in a unique culture that is both seductively exotic and strangely familiar. With wit and verve, she claims her own Korean identity and illuminates the intricate experiences of Asian-American women in this century.

Comments

NI_Rak NI_Rak
I just finished reading "Still Life with Rice." It was especially interesting because we had just been to Korea. I wanted an understanding of the culture and the effects of so many years of war. While in Korea we stood looking across the water into N.Korea and I felt the agony of the many thousands of S. Korean people who had loved ones kidnapped to N Korea in 1951. They did not know who in their family survived the war and were trapped in N. Korea.

This is a memoir written by a granddaughter about her grandmother's life growing up in both N & S Korea and China and the suffering of the war years. It is very frank in the descriptions and it is hard to imagine the hardships they survived. It also gives insight into older generations watching Korean culture change with immigration to the USA. If you ever wondered about the Korean war this first-person memoir is a good read. It is also a book about the challenge of trying to record first-person accounts before older relatives are no longer able to tell us what it was like for them. There are some aspects of the grandmother's life that were self-inflicted tragedy - her desire to sell opium to gain wealth was tragic. But there were great changes in her goals, focus and desires over the years. I think it reveals that in old age the grandmother realized ways that she had failed as a mother. I am thankful the granddaughter preserved this account and I recommend it to anyone wondering about life in Korea in the Korean war years.

Barbara Anne Waite -Author of Memoir "Elsie-Adventures of an Arizona Schoolteacher 1913-1916"
Wrathmaster Wrathmaster
I ordered a previously used book. While it was rather old and a bit yellowed, the overall condition was excellent. Still Life with Rice is the story of the author's grandmother as a young Korean woman from just prior to North Korea invading South Korea to the end of her life. The author is a Korean American who wasn't interested in her grandmother's past or in anything Korean - until. . . Excellent, captivating and historically informative read - very well written. Great discussion for our book group about trials of war, human endurance, love & loyalty, immigration, prejudice, many race related issues and family dynamics.
Lailace Lailace
Still Life, With Rice is a beautiful depiction of the Korean woman. Helie Lee introduces us to a Korean-American female narrator who is unaware of the power behind her culture. She views her mother and grandmother as coming from the "old-school," thus defying her Korean identity. On a trip to Korea, our narrator begins a journey to awakening, which we, as readers feel because Lee then transforms the narration to that of our narrator's grandmother. We live through the grandmother's life from childhood, through marriage, children, the Korean War, love, loss, wealth, despair, and everything in between.

The novel also addresses major issues about the old oppression of women, the affect of the Japanese take-over in Korea, and the war that divided families along with the North and South. Through such an intimate encounter with such a powerful and lovable woman, we learn the struggles and history that exudes from Korea.

Overall, an absolutely wonderful read for someone who is looking to understand Korean history on an accessible level, or for a reader looking for a great quest of emotional discovery.
Seevinev Seevinev
I really enjoyed this book. I live in Korea as the wife of a US military officer. I have lived here for over a year and have daily contact with many Koreans. This book gave me valuable insight into the Koreans around me. Obviously not everyone is the same. However, this book taught me a lot about Korean culture and traditions, some aspects of which have sometimes confused and frustrated me. The morning after I stayed up half the night finishing this book (I couldn't put it down), as I drove around, I looked at these natives of my host country through entirely new eyes.

I have been telling everyone I come into contact with about this book. So far, everyone who has read it at my recommendation has been in full agreement with me.

The story is incredible. After I finished it, I spoke with a Korean woman I know well who was about 8 during the Korean War. Her stories were strikingly similar to what I read in the book.

This book is a must read, whether you have a relationship with Korea or not.
Jack Jack
This is truly an incredible journey: A true story that reads like a gripping novel: from a mother trying to cast out the worms that gnaw at her daughter's stomach, to trying to cross the shell of a bridge from North Korea to South Korea during the war, with children in tow. It will make you appreciate everything you have: your family, the food on your table, the clothes on your back. It will make you want to read the sequel: In the Absence of Sun, which details the family's struggle to smuggle family out of North Korea--unbelievable! There can't be a more oppressive country on the planet. Helie Lee draws attention to this divided country that is often overlooked.
ME ME
Bought this copy because I'd given mine away. I am a Caucasian married to a Korean man and this book helped me understand Korean culture (and my Korean mother-in-law) more than anything I've ever read. I highly recommend it.
Nagor Nagor
Tremendous, heart-touching book. Captivating, almost as if you were actually there in person, more like a 6/5.
It told me what North Korea is really like. Worse than the press tells you. Fascinating read, I couldn't put the book down. It was recommended to me by a 26 year old Korean who recently returned from five years in Korea--she was so totally American that her father wanted her to understand her roots and sent her there for five years.