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eBook Black and Blue: African Americans, the Labor Movement, and the Decline of the Democratic Party (Princeton Studies in American Politics: Historical, International, and Comparative Perspectives) ePub

eBook Black and Blue: African Americans, the Labor Movement, and the Decline of the Democratic Party (Princeton Studies in American Politics: Historical, International, and Comparative Perspectives) ePub

by Paul Frymer

  • ISBN: 0691134650
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Paul Frymer
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press (December 9, 2007)
  • Pages: 224
  • ePub book: 1697 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1242 kb
  • Other: lrf azw lit lrf
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 146

Description

Paul Frymer has written a book that deserves to take its place as one of the canonical texts for students and scholars interested in exploring the troubled intersection of race and class in American political development (APD).

Paul Frymer has written a book that deserves to take its place as one of the canonical texts for students and scholars interested in exploring the troubled intersection of race and class in American political development (APD). Black and Blue is an ambitious and well-executed project that enhances our understanding of its subject. --Janice Fine, Perspectives on Politics. This book will be the standard and basic book for generations to come. It will be and is the sine qua non for serious scholars in this area

Cite this publication. Firstly, international and domestic politics are interdependent, which is shown through a deconstruction of Iran’s democracy movement during Ahmadinezhad’s presidency. It will look at how African American support for the Democratic Party varied across the South: assessing the reasons why some black men were conservative and how they embraced the politics of white Democrats, and how the majority of black men and women opposed their political choices.

In the 1930s, fewer than one in one hundred .  . The labor and civil rights movements are the cornerstones of the Democratic Party, but for much of the twentieth century these movements worked independently of one another. Paul Frymer argues that as Democrats passed separate legislation to promote labor rights and racial equality they split the issues of class and race into two sets of institutions, neither of which had enough authority to integrate the labor movement.

Series: Princeton Studies in American Politics: Historical, International .

Series: Princeton Studies in American Politics: Historical, International, and Comparative Perspectives. Published by: Princeton University Press.

Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2007. Recommend this journal.

Black and Blue: African Americans, the Labor Movement, and .

Black and Blue: African Americans, the Labor Movement, and the Decline of the Democratic Party. Winner of the 2009 Best Book Award in Race, Ethnicity, and Politics, American Political Science Association. Paul Frymer is associate professor of politics and director of the Legal Studies Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He is the author of Uneasy Alliances: Race and Party Competition in America (Princeton).

Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2008. Frymer notes that white racism has not only divided the labor movement, but also that it was "institutionalized" within it to the extent that racist practices have proven incredibly difficult to exorcise.

Black and Blue : African Americans, the Labor Movement, and the Decline of the Democratic Party. Part of the Princeton Studies in American Politics: Historical, International, and Comparative Perspectives Series). Black and Blue explores the politics and history that led to this dramatic integration of organized labor. In the process, the book tells a broader story about how the Democratic Party unintentionally sowed the seeds of labor's decline.

Princeton University Press, 2008. The Parties in Our Heads: Misperceptions about Party Composition and Their Consequences. aMcKendree University. Hajnal et al. Political Homophily in Social Relationships: Evidence from Online Dating Behavior. Huber et al. Evaluating the Conflict-Reducing Effect of UN Peacekeeping Operations. Hegre et al. The Delegate Paradox: Why Polarized Politicians Can Represent Citizens Best.

American political development (often abbreviated as APD) is a subfield of political science that studies the . Black and Blue: African Americans, the Labor Movement, and the Decline of the Democratic Party (2007) by Paul Frymer.

American political development (often abbreviated as APD) is a subfield of political science that studies the historical development of politics in the United States. Legacies of Losing in American Politics (2018) by Jeffrey K. Tulis and Nicole Mellow. a b Kersh, Rogan (2005-01-01). The Growth of American Political Development: The View from the Classroom".

In the 1930s, fewer than one in one hundred U.S. labor union members were African American. By 1980, the figure was more than one in five. Black and Blue explores the politics and history that led to this dramatic integration of organized labor. In the process, the book tells a broader story about how the Democratic Party unintentionally sowed the seeds of labor's decline.

The labor and civil rights movements are the cornerstones of the Democratic Party, but for much of the twentieth century these movements worked independently of one another. Paul Frymer argues that as Democrats passed separate legislation to promote labor rights and racial equality they split the issues of class and race into two sets of institutions, neither of which had enough authority to integrate the labor movement.

From this division, the courts became the leading enforcers of workplace civil rights, threatening unions with bankruptcy if they resisted integration. The courts' previously unappreciated power, however, was also a problem: in diversifying unions, judges and lawyers enfeebled them financially, thus democratizing through destruction. Sharply delineating the double-edged sword of state and legal power, Black and Blue chronicles an achievement that was as problematic as it was remarkable, and that demonstrates the deficiencies of race- and class-based understandings of labor, equality, and power in America.