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eBook First and Second Epistles to the Thessalonians (Harper's New Testament Commentaries) ePub

eBook First and Second Epistles to the Thessalonians (Harper's New Testament Commentaries) ePub

by Ernest Best

  • ISBN: 0913573647
  • Category: Encyclopedias and Subject Guides
  • Subcategory: Reference
  • Author: Ernest Best
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Hendrickson Pub (December 1, 1987)
  • ePub book: 1583 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1170 kb
  • Other: txt rtf azw docx
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 639

Description

It is also worth seeking out Morris’s contribution to the Word Biblical Themes series written in 1989. This is little book is a biblical theology, drawing out several key themes of importance in the letters.

Ernest Best points out that the Thessalonians have experienced some rough times, and that Paul is praising them for holding on to their faith and sharing it with others. He stresses that they they should keep this up, because the Lord is coming soon.

Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1937) GP-Gospel Perspectives: Studies of History and Tradition in the Four Gospels, 6. vols.

By: Gordon D. Fee. More in NICNT Series.

Paul wrote the first epistle to the Thessalonians after being forced to. .The second epistle was written not long afterward.

Paul wrote the first epistle to the Thessalonians after being forced to leave the city. He was concerned for these new believers because of the persecution they were suffering. Wanamaker attempts to resolve some of the difficulties related to these letters by arguing that 2 Thessalonians was actually written before 1 Thessalonians.

Chapter X. The First Epistle to the Thessalonians The Shorter Epistles Pungent i.The second epistle of paul the apostle to the thessalonians.similar opinions of Marcion's treatment of the second epistle, which the. tertullian/the five books against marcion/chapter xv the first epistle t. tm. The First Epistle to the Thessalonians. former attended the apostle only on his second missionary journey. /pullan/the books of the new testament/chapter ix 1 and . tm ye received hi. (2 Corinthians 7:15. For all these reasons he writes the second Epistle.

Most New Testament scholars believe Paul the Apostle wrote this letter from Corinth . Ernest Best, The First and Second Epistles to the Thessalonians (New York: Harper and Row, 1972), p. 7. ^ Best.

Most New Testament scholars believe Paul the Apostle wrote this letter from Corinth, although information appended to this work in many early manuscripts (. Codices Alexandrinus, Mosquensis, and Angelicus) state that Paul wrote it in Athens after Timothy had returned from Macedonia with news of the state of the church in Thessalonica (Acts 18:1–5; 1 Thes ^ Ernest Best, The First and Second Epistles to the Thessalonians (New York: Harper and Row, 1972), p. ^ Best, Thessalonians, pp. 22–9.

The Second Epistle to the Thessalonians, commonly referred to as Second Thessalonians or 2 Thessalonians is a book from the New Testament of the Christian Bible. It is traditionally attributed to Paul the Apostle, with Timothy as a co-author. Modern biblical scholarship is divided on whether the epistle was written by Paul; many scholars reject its authenticity based on what they see as differences in style and theology between this and the First Epistle to the Thessalonians.

Book by Best, Ernest

Comments

dermeco dermeco
excellent
Mildorah Mildorah
Satisfied
Whitehammer Whitehammer
very nice condition
Kann Kann
This commentary was one of the most highly regarded expositions of 1 and 2 Thessalonians in the latter half of the 20th century. Ernest Best points out that the Thessalonians have experienced some rough times, and that Paul is praising them for holding on to their faith and sharing it with others. He stresses that they they should keep this up, because the Lord is coming soon.

Best believes that Paul was responsible for both 1 and 2 Thessalonians and that the end times positions of the two epistles are not as different as critical scholars have suggested.

The commentary itself has the footnotes buried within the text of the commentary, which makes for tougher and choppier reading. Moreover, not everyone will be convinced that Best's interpretations are always best. For example, some will disagree with interpreting skenos in 1 Thessalonians 4:3 as a reference to the believer's "wife" rather than to the believer's own body.

Moreover, some will feel Best is chastising Paul too hard for his statement about the reference to the Jews killing Jesus in 1 Thessalonians 2:14. Best sees it as an example of Paul spouting anti-semitic rhetoric. But since Paul is Jewish and he elsewhere expresses his great love for his people (Romans 9-11), it would be better to see this as a bitter disagreement among family members. Paul is upset that many of his Jewish brothers have not only rejected the idea of Jesus' messiahship, but try to hinder others from coming to Christ. He castigates his Jewish brothers for their role in the death of Christ, just as the prophets of the Old Testament often castigated their own people for their role in rejecting God's will (Isaiah 1:4, 5:24, Jeremiah 2:11.

Best also discusses the teaching in 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18, rightfully noting that the final destination of the living and deceased believers in Christ is left "hanging in the air."

In 2 Thessalonians, he points out that Paul is not denying the suddenness of the Lord's return, but that he is qualifying it by teaching that it will come suddenly after the revelation of the man of lawlessness. This interpretation can be questioned.

Another questionable call is that Best sees the katechon holding back the man of lawlessness (2 Thess 2:6-7) as a reference to an evil person or force. But why would evil hold back evil? It's possible, but it makes better sense to say that good holds back evil.

It's not always easy to read, but you will learn a lot from this commentary. Read it along with Leon Morris' Eerdmans commentary on these epistles.
Mitynarit Mitynarit
He is very thoughtful. However in 2 Thess 2:4 I think the man if sin is a a figure for the nation, like the whore in Revelation. He gets close to that.

In 1 Thess 4:16 is good too. And yes I will brag and say I wrote a book on this too.