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eBook The New Philosophy and Universal Languages in Seventeenth-Century England: Bacon, Hobbes, and Wilkins ePub

eBook The New Philosophy and Universal Languages in Seventeenth-Century England: Bacon, Hobbes, and Wilkins ePub

by Robert E. Stillman

  • ISBN: 0838753108
  • Category: Words Language and Grammar
  • Subcategory: Reference
  • Author: Robert E. Stillman
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Bucknell Univ Pr (October 1, 1995)
  • Pages: 359
  • ePub book: 1559 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1480 kb
  • Other: lit lrf txt azw
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 929

Description

Robert E. Stillman's book is an effort to restore the neglected history of those new philosophies of seventeenth-century England .

Robert E. Stillman's book is an effort to restore the neglected history of those new philosophies of seventeenth-century England that sought to align themselves not with radical ideologies, but with the conservative interests of centralizing state power.

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17th/18th Century Philosophy. 20th Century Philosophy. History of Western Philosophy, Misc. 19th Century Philosophy. Philosophical Traditions.

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Bacon, Hobbes, and Wilkins construct philosophies out of deeply held . Those three projects are the new philosophies of Lord Chancellor Bacon.

Bacon, Hobbes, and Wilkins construct philosophies out of deeply held convictions about the need to provide a saving form of knowledge to remedy cultural crises. Robert E.

by Robert E.

book by Robert E. by Robert E.

April 6, 2019 History. found in the catalog. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read.

It sets out to recover the neglected history of those emerging new philosophies that endeavor to align themselves not with radical ideologies but with the conservative interest of centralizing state power.

Robert E. Stillman's book is an effort to restore the neglected history of those new philosophies of seventeenth-century England that sought to align themselves not with radical ideologies, but with the conservative interests of centralizing state power. Against the background of England's universal language movement, his study traces the development of three distinguishable philosophical projects, organized upon three distinguishable theories of language. In all three, a more perfect language comprises both a model and a means for achieving a more perfect philosophy, and that philosophy, in turn, a vehicle for promoting political authority in the state. Those three projects are the new philosophies of Lord Chancellor Bacon, Thomas Hobbes, and Bishop John Wilkins, all of which can be usefully understood in the broader context of the century's cultural politics and in the more specific circumstances of the century's fascination with the construction of a universal language. Bacon, Hobbes, and Wilkins construct philosophies out of deeply held convictions about the need to provide a saving form of knowledge to remedy cultural crises. That saving form of knowledge, as it develops in the lines of linguistic thought that extend from Bacon's Instauration to Wilkins's Philosophical Language, is both a product of and one potent agent in producing the emerging, scientistically designed, modern state.