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eBook Mental Lexicon: Some Words to Talk About Words ePub

eBook Mental Lexicon: Some Words to Talk About Words ePub

by Patrick Bonin

  • ISBN: 1590338405
  • Category: Words Language and Grammar
  • Subcategory: Reference
  • Author: Patrick Bonin
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Nova Science Pub Inc; UK ed. edition (September 1, 2003)
  • Pages: 241
  • ePub book: 1974 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1901 kb
  • Other: lrf lrf docx txt
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 438

Description

This book is about the mental lexicon and opens an understanding of this aspect of human cognition. The mental lexicon is still a central topic in psycholinguistics and, more generally speaking, in cognitive science.

This book is about the mental lexicon and opens an understanding of this aspect of human cognition. This book is about the mental lexicon and opens an understanding of this aspect of human cognition. Is it possible to define what is intended by the expression "mental lexicon", a concept coined by Oldfield as early as 1966?

some words to talk about words.

some words to talk about words. Published 2004 by Nova Science Publishers in Hauppauge, . Includes bibliographical references and index.

See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. by. Patrick Bonin (Contributor).

Mental Lexicon: Some Words to Talk about Words. The authors propose as a working definition that the mental lexicon corresponds to the mental repository of all representations that are intrinsically related to words

Mental Lexicon: Some Words to Talk about Words. The authors propose as a working definition that the mental lexicon corresponds to the mental repository of all representations that are intrinsically related to words.

Patrick Bonin, Alain Miot, and Bruno Boyer 6. Age-of-acquisition and concreteness effects in reading . C) 2017-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners.

C) 2017-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book.

Keywords: Mental lexicon, Words, Memory, storage and organization 1. Introduction It is. .Mental lexicon: Some words to talk about words. New York: Nova Science Publishers.

Moreover many scholars agree that human beings know a lot of words and they can locate them in a fraction of second (Muller, 2008) Bonin (2004) declares that mental lexicon contains several types of representations including phonological, semantic, morphological and orthographic.

The mental lexicon is necessary because without it, linguistic production would be long and labourious and . One of the central issues in developing a model of the mental lexicon is whether the form of a word in the lexicon (.

The mental lexicon is necessary because without it, linguistic production would be long and labourious and would not accurately represent one's thoughts. An analogy that is often used to illustrate the concept of the mental lexicon is that of a printed dictionary, which is similar to a lexicon. phonological, /kat/, or orthographic, cat ) is represented with its meaning (. the idea or concept of a cat) in the same lexical entry or if they occupy separate entries (Rapp & Goldrick, 2006).

The term mental lexicon was introduced by . Oldfield in the article "Things, Words and the Brain" (Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, v. 18, 1966). In a similar fashion, the mental lexicon must represent at least some aspects of the meaning of the word, although surely not in the same way as does a printed dictionary; likewise, it must include information about the pronunciation of the word although, again, probably not in the same form as an ordinary dictionary. D. Fay and A. Cutler, "Malapropisms and the Structure of the Mental Lexicon.

Brand Nova Science Pub Inc. Book.

This book is about the mental lexicon and opens an understanding of this aspect of human cognition. The mental lexicon is still a central topic in psycholinguistics and, more generally speaking, in cognitive science. Is it possible to define what is intended by the expression mental lexicon, a concept coined by Oldfield as early as 1966? Are the terms that the authors have at their disposal still sufficient to discuss this hypothesised mental entity -- the mental lexicon -- which is intended to cover many different aspects of words? The authors propose as a working definition that the mental lexicon corresponds to the mental repository of all representations that are intrinsically related to words. This book extends its research in psycholinguistics and focuses on the word.