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eBook Emotive Signs in Language and Semantic Functioning of Derived Nouns in Russian (Linguistic and Literary Studies in Eastern Europe) ePub

eBook Emotive Signs in Language and Semantic Functioning of Derived Nouns in Russian (Linguistic and Literary Studies in Eastern Europe) ePub

by Bronislava Volkova

  • ISBN: 9027215294
  • Category: Words Language and Grammar
  • Subcategory: Reference
  • Author: Bronislava Volkova
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company (January 1, 1987)
  • Pages: 282
  • ePub book: 1329 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1618 kb
  • Other: azw lit doc txt
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 516

Description

The book thus begins with a general treatment on emotivity, goes on to. .

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Fritz Hermanns, Heidelberg (Germany), Dimension of Meaning III: Aspects of Emotion, in Lexicology (An international handbook on the nature and structure of words and vocabularies), Walter de Gruyter, Berlin, New York, 2002. This study presents alternative views on major works and authors of Czech and Central European literature in a feminist and non-elitist perspective. While her semiotic approach to the literary text is in the great tradition of the Prague Linguistic Circle, her feminist angle brings in a much needed new perspective.

Wang, H. & Derwing, B. L. (1994). Some vowel schemas in three English morphological classes: experimental evidence. In M. Y. Chen & O. C. Tseng (Ed., In honor of Professor William . Wierzbicka, A. (1980).

Based on careful investigation of these words’ morphological, syntactic and semantic properties, it is argued that they are both verbs and nouns

Some vowel schemas in three English morphological classes: exper-imental evidence. Based on careful investigation of these words’ morphological, syntactic and semantic properties, it is argued that they are both verbs and nouns. However, they are not prototypical members of either category in the sense of cognitive linguistics.

pragmatic features and aspects of any communicative interactien, expres- sive and especially emotive sign. a!s have not been given the attention they deserve in linguistic literature.

San Francisco, Washington, London: Jossey. pragmatic features and aspects of any communicative interactien, expres- sive and especially emotive sign.

3. Fillmore, Charles J. Frame Semantics. Cognitive Linguistics: basic readings, page 373. Berlin: Walter De Gruyter GmbH & Co. Ostromov, or the Sorcerer’s Apprentice.

Studies in Accentology and Slavic Linguistics in Honor of Ronald F. Feldstein. Such types of signs are usually produced unintentionally. Bloomington, IN: Slavica Publishers, 2015, 293–306. he most typical emotive signs, however, are actually intention- 298 Bronislava Volková ally used symbolic indexes, namely mixed signs, which contain the arbitrary re- lationship between the signiier and the emotive content-no diferent from the usual referential signs. However, this relationship is modiied and complemented in different ways, according to which an emotive-sign typology can be constructed.

This monograph is intended as a contribution to the integral description of language and verbal communication. Chapter I and Chapters VII and VIII are concerned with general problems of emotivity and expressivity in language as such and on all linguistic levels. These chapters describe emotivity from a new semiotic perspective and suggest a typology of emotive signs and meanings. Chapter II discusses general methodology of investigating and "measuring" emotive meaning in the area of word-formation (with examples from Russian). Chapters III, IV and V treat Russian diminutives fromgeneral-structural, lexical-contextual and pragmatic perspectives, while Chapter VI presents a comparison of the semantic structures of the various types of emotive noun derivatives which exist in Russian. The book thus begins with a general treatment on emotivity, goes on to consider the specific case of emotive noun-formation, giving special attention to the Russian diminutives, and then returns, by way of a comparison of the semantic structures of various types of emotive nouns, to more general problems of emotivity in language and to semiotic typology.