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eBook Learning to Argue in Higher Education: ePub

eBook Learning to Argue in Higher Education: ePub

by Sally Mitchell,Richard Andrews

  • ISBN: 0867094982
  • Category: Words Language and Grammar
  • Subcategory: Reference
  • Author: Sally Mitchell,Richard Andrews
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Heinemann; 1 edition (April 1, 2000)
  • Pages: 237
  • ePub book: 1598 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1541 kb
  • Other: lrf mobi txt doc
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 369

Description

Start by marking Learning to Argue in Higher Education as Want to. .The book represents a range of disciplines, including architecture, law, social science, work-based education, as well as writing and composition.

Start by marking Learning to Argue in Higher Education as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Yet on one thing most educators agree: it is almost Learning to Argue in Higher Education promises to make a substantial contribution to the thinking about argument in rhetoric and composition. John M. Trimbur, Worcester Polytechnical University "Argument" is perhaps one of the most misunderstood terms in higher education, meaning different things in different disciplines.

Her chapter in Learning to Argue in Higher Education (Mitchell and Andrews, 2000) focuses on the situatedness of argument " by.

Her chapter in Learning to Argue in Higher Education (Mitchell and Andrews, 2000) focuses on the situatedness of argument " by reflecting on pedagogical consequences of the use of the term 'argument' itself " (ibid. With Sally Mitchell, he compares between how people teach in Higher Education and how they should teach in more productive ways, which are argumentative. Mitchell & Andrews, 2000). Other educational programs have been implemented in different countries.

Argumentation in Higher Education offers professors, lecturers and . Richard Andrews is Professor in English at the Institute of Education, University of London.

This professional guide aims to make the complex topic of argumentation open and transparent. The book argues for a more explicit treatment of argument (the product) and argumentation (the process) in higher education, so that the ground rules of the academic discipline in question are made clear.

"Argument" is perhaps one of the most misunderstood terms in higher education . This book explores why argument is taught in the first place, how it figures in teaching and learning, and discusses more productive ways of thinking about it.

"Argument" is perhaps one of the most misunderstood terms in higher education, meaning different things to different disciplines  . Persuasion (Rhetoric) - Study and teaching (Higher). Report writing - Study and teaching (Higher).

Richard Andrews has ten years of experience teaching English, Drama . essays, Learning to Argue in Higher Education (ok.

References to this book. Learning to Argue in Higher Education Sally Mitchell,Richard Andrews Snippet view - 2000. Bibliographic information.

uk's Richard Andrews Page and shop for all Richard Andrews books. 2. 2 (5 used & new offers). published on (March, 2000). Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Richard Andrews. 8 (2 used & new offers). 9 (6 used & new offers). by R. Andrews and J. Noble.

Sally Mitchell, Richard Andrews, Learning to Argue in Higher Education, Boynton/Cook, 2000. Higher Education Academy project on supporting undergraduate argumentation skills: ww. eacademy. Bryan Greetham, How to Write Better Essays, Palgrave Study Guides, 2001.

This book shows how to nurture productive and civilized argumentation in the broader interests of informed and tolerant discourse. Teaching Theology and Religion.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

"Argument" is perhaps one of the most misunderstood terms in higher education, meaning different things in different disciplines. Yet on one thing most educators agree: it is almost impossible to attain success at the highest levels in the humanities, arts, social sciences, and other language-based disciplines without a command of argumentative skills. Learning to Argue in Higher Education was written to allow for a cross-fertilization of ideas about argument between different disciplines and traditions, and to encourage conversation about their approaches to its teaching and learning.

This volume makes a significant contribution to the current thinking about argument, addressing why we teach argument in the first place, how it currently figures in teaching and learning, and how me might think about it in more productive ways. Covering everything from formal discussion in seminars to tutorials and written essays, these authors approach the problem from different angles: critical accounts of practice, classroom pedagogy, as well theoretical models of argument, students' perspective on learning, and the dynamics involved in teaching and learning. The book represents a range of disciplines, including architecture, law, social science, work-based education, as well as writing and composition.