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eBook Scoop: The Evolution of a Southern Reporter ePub

eBook Scoop: The Evolution of a Southern Reporter ePub

by Jack Nelson,Barbara Matusow,Hank Klibanoff,Richard T. Cooper

  • ISBN: 1617036587
  • Category: Writing Research and Publishing Guides
  • Subcategory: Reference
  • Author: Jack Nelson,Barbara Matusow,Hank Klibanoff,Richard T. Cooper
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University Press of Mississippi; 1st Edition edition (December 10, 2012)
  • Pages: 208
  • ePub book: 1108 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1162 kb
  • Other: lrf mobi mbr txt
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 535

Description

Jack Nelson was an eyewitness to one of the most significant political and economic transformations of the twentieth . While he was given 'Scoop' as a nickname when a cub reporter, Jack Nelson grew to be a lion in journalistic circles by scoring one major scoop after another.

Jack Nelson was an eyewitness to one of the most significant political and economic transformations of the twentieth century. He was also a daring reporter, unafraid to confront powerful political leaders who resisted that change with force. He became one of the twentieth century's best-and most respected-reporters, and this posthumous memoir is testament to the moral force he brought to his profession.

Personal Name: Nelson, Jack, 1929-2009. Publication, Distribution, et. Jackson A taste of injustice Birth of a salesman Biloxi boy "Scoop" Sin and salt water My so-called military career Atlanta Back on the vice beat Little Rock A snake pit called Milledgeville Dead men voting Sin in the classic city Harvard man The murder of Lemuel Penn Making the break Selma Jim Crow justice The meanest town in the south Deacons for. defense and justice The Orangeburg Massacre Travels with George Martin Luther King J. from Gee's Bend to Memphis Ambush in Meridian Number one on J. Edgar Hoover's shit list. Personal Name: Nelson, Jack, 1929-2009.

Additional Physical Form Entry: Nelson, Jack, 1929-2009.

Journalists like Jack Nelson and Clark Mollenhoff fell into it by inclination .

Journalists like Jack Nelson and Clark Mollenhoff fell into it by inclination, and others worked at it only sporadically as stories arose. His colleague from the LA Times Washington bureau, Richard T. Cooper, helps by adding an epilogue to provide some insight into Nelson’s career during the 1970s and discusses Nelson’s contributions to the founding of The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press. Like most memoirs published by investigative reporters, Scoop suffers some from being a chronicle of war stories rather than a book with solid analysis.

The event is moderated by Hank Klibanoff, co-author of "Race Beat.

Barbara Matusow is joined in conversation by former President Jimmy Carter, Andrew Young, former Mayor of Atlanta and . Ambassador to the United Nations, and former Justice Department spokesman Terry Adamson to discuss Jack Nelson's memoir, "Scoop: The Evolution of a Southern Reporter" at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum in Atlanta. The event is moderated by Hank Klibanoff, co-author of "Race Beat. Mr. Klibanoff also wrote the introduction for "Scoop.

Introduction by Hank Klibanoff. Wherever he landed, Nelson found the corruption others missed or disregarded. Had i not become a reporter I might have been a hell of a salesman. Epilogue by Richard T. Cooper. Published by: University Press of Mississippi. He found it in lawless Biloxi; he found it in buttoned-up corporate Atlanta; he found it in the college town of Athens, Georgia. When I was a kid, people used to call me a hustler-someone who gets the job done with dispatch.

Hank Klibanoff (Introduction).

Haven’t yet read Scoop: The Evolution of a Southern Reporter by Jack Nelson?

com or the publisher: the University Press of Mississippi: ww. press. Or call 800-737-7788.

From a gullible cub reporter with the Daily Herald in Biloxi and Gulfport, to the pugnacious Pulitzer Prize winner at the Atlanta Constitution, to the peerless beat reporter for the Los Angeles Times covering civil rights in the South, Jack Nelson (1929-2009) was dedicated to exposing injustice and corruption wherever he found it. Whether it was the gruesome conditions at a twelve-thousand-bed mental hospital in Georgia or the cruelties of Jim Crow inequity, Nelson proved himself to be one of those rare reporters whose work affected and improved thousands of lives.

His memories about difficult circumstances, contentious people, and calamitous events provide a unique window into some of the most momentous periods in southern and U.S. history. Wherever he landed, Nelson found the corruption others missed or disregarded. He found it in lawless Biloxi; he found it in buttoned-up corporate Atlanta; he found it in the college town of Athens, Georgia. Nelson turned his investigations of illegal gambling, liquor sales, prostitution, shakedowns, and corrupt cops into such a trademark that honest mayors and military commanders called on him to expose miscreants in their midst.

Once he realized that segregation was another form of corruption, he became a premier reporter of the civil rights movement and its cast of characters, including Martin Luther King Jr., Stokely Carmichael, Alabama's Sheriff Jim Clarke, George Wallace, and others. He was, through his steely commitment to journalism, a chronicler of great events, a witness to news, a shaper and reshaper of viewpoints, and indeed one of the most important journalists of the twentieth century.

Comments

Amarin Amarin
Of course I'm biased since I edited this book, my late husband's memoir covering his career in the South. I don't think anyone would dispute that Jack Nelson's contributions to the field of investigative reporting were monumental. He tore the state of Georgia wide open in the 50's and 60's, exposing the state's bottomless corruption, and he broke new ground covering the civil rights movement. He has been called one of the most important journalists of the twentieth century, so his story deserves to be read, both for his place in history and because it's a darned good tale.
Zeus Wooden Zeus Wooden
“Skunk, a little bastard, a lying son of a bitch” are three of the epithets which were applied to the late, legendary journalist Jack Nelson during his scrappy early years as an investigative reporter for the Atlanta Journal Constitution which are described in his memoir Scoop The Evolution of a Southern Reporter. He was obviously doing something right. His reporting on conditions at Midgeville State Hospital, in 1959 the world's larget mental institution, earned him a Pulitzer Prize.

Nelson's memoir is characterized by a rare honesty. He loved his work, he loved trying to set the world to rights but he never pretended to be anything other than what he was. Although by Southern standards of the early sixties Nelson was considered a liberal he admits that his commitment to and interest in civil rights evolved from indifference through sympathy to a full blown passionate cause only after he was recruited by the Los Angeles Times to report for their Atlanta Bureau. In 1962 he had spent a year at Harvard as a Nieman Fellow where he came to understand how race and justice were intertwined and in 1964 covered for the Constitution the murder by Klansmen of Lemuel Penn. These two experiences were seminal in his realization that he was missing out on something huge and important.

In a short assessment of career highlights he writes “But reporting on the South in the 1960s, when I finally applied my investigative experience to the unfolding drama of racial change remains the most satisfying assignment of all.” Nelson knew the heroes, the racists, the bad and the good actors and writes the plain, unvarnished truth of it all. Here you will find the background reporting which led to Nelson's books on the Orangeburg Massacre and Terror in the Night: The Klan's Campaign against the Jews. It all seems a very long time ago. If it is not it is because fearless investigative reporters like Nelson do the work of letting us know.
Steamy Ibis Steamy Ibis
Jack Nelson one of the greatest writers of our time. He left us too soon. For those who are not familiar with Jack it will be a wonderful experience to get to know him through his writings and books. He was the Los Angeles Bureau chief in Washington,D.C. for many years.However, to read about his life will give you insight of the great man he was and his contribution in making us understand many things going on in the country during the 60's through the 80's.
avanger avanger
In his memoir, the lateJack Nelson reveals himself to be supremely honest about his career as an investigative journalist in the South in the 50's, 60's and 70's, Warts and all. In the telling of his early career, he also reveals the courage and the indefatigable energy he used in going after his stories.
A great read!
Diab Diab
This is such an enjoyable book, as well as a must read for anyone in journalism. Jack was a warm, witty, astute, and generous man whose life was a fascinating ride. I simply loved this book.
saafari saafari
excellent book
Nikojas Nikojas
I ordered this book for my boss, who is a former politician, and he thought that Mr. Nelson did an excellent job in writing this political history!
This book gives the reader an opportunity to glimpse into a time in our history that is painful and disgraceful. Jack Nelson's bold honesty in his strengths and weaknesses was what makes this book such a great read.