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eBook Just the Facts: How Objectivity Came to Define American Journalism ePub

eBook Just the Facts: How Objectivity Came to Define American Journalism ePub

by David T.Z. Mindich

  • ISBN: 081475614X
  • Category: Writing Research and Publishing Guides
  • Subcategory: Reference
  • Author: David T.Z. Mindich
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: NYU Press; Revised ed. edition (July 1, 2000)
  • Pages: 200
  • ePub book: 1525 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1677 kb
  • Other: lit txt mobi rtf
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 991

Description

Just the Facts: How "Obje. has been added to your Cart. David Mindich begins and ends his book with the assertion that objectivity, and the particular instance of journalistic objectivity, are myths that no one believes in outside of contemporary newsrooms.

Just the Facts: How "Obje. These inter-related assertions of opinion sandwich a historical analysis of how "objectivity" came to be the guiding ethic of American journalism.

Taking a fresh, panoramic view of objectivity, David Mindich improves our understanding of a key journalistic concept. This perceptive book offers both intriguing stories and a helpful historical framework for current debates on press performance. Jeffery Smith,University of Iowa. Unfortunately, apart from a glib reference to Jaques Derrida, and a terribly mistaken point on Albert Einstein, Mindich completely avoids addressing the considerable history of philosophical objectivity in the same historical time-frame.

David T. Z. Mindich reaches back to the nineteenth century to recover the lost history and meaning of this central tenet of American journalism. His book draws on high profile cases, showing the degree to which journalism and its evolving commitment to objectivity altered–and in some cases limited-the public's understanding of events and issues. Mindich reaches back to the nineteenth century to recover the lost history and meaning of this central tenet of American journalism

David T. His book draws on high profile cases, showing the degree to which journalism and its evolving commitment to objectivity altered-and in some cases limited-the public's understanding of events and issues.

If American journalism were a religion, as it has been called, then its supreme deity would be "objectivity. David T. The high priests of the profession worship the concept, while the iconoclasts of advocacy journalism, new journalism, and cyberjournalism consider objectivity a golden calf.

I have ready many books on journalism and its historical significance, but none traces how objectivity has shaped the profession like "Just the Facts.

If American journalism were a religion, as it has been called, then its supreme deity would be objectivity. If American journalism were a religion, as it has been called, then its supreme deity would be "objectivity. I have ready many books on journalism and its historical significance, but none traces how objectivity has shaped the profession like "Just the Facts.

Download PDF book format

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Acknowledgments Introduction: objectivity Detachment : the caning of James Gordon Bennett, the Penny Press, and objectivitiy's primordial soup Nonpartisanship : three shades of political journalism The inverted pyramid : Edwin M. Stanton and information control Facticity : science, culture, cholera, and the rise of journalism's "native empiricism," 1832-66 Balance : a "slanderous and nasty-minded mulatress," Ida B. Wells, confronts "objectivity in the 1890s.

In Just the Facts, Mindich argued that journalist objectivity evolved in stages over a broad period, from the 1830s to the 1890s. Just the Facts: How "Objectivity" Came to Define American Journalism (NYU Press, 1998). Looking at five separate "elements" of nt, nonpartisanship, inverted pyramid writing, facticity, and balance-Mindich pinpointed specific historical moments when newswriting advanced toward its present form.

Just the Facts: How Objectivity Came to Define American Journalism. Discovering the News: A Social History of American Newspapers. New York: Basic Books. New York: New York University Press. The Sociology of News Production. In Social Meaning of News: A Text-Reader. Dan Berkowitz, ed. Pp. 7-22. php?title Objectivity (journalism)&oldid 6308521".

At a rate never before seen in American history, young adults are abandoning traditional news media. In an engaged and intelligent way, Mindich outlines these problems and proposes real solutions. Tuned Out: Why Americans Under 40 Don't Follow the News examines the reasons behind this problem and its consequences for American society. Author David T. Mindich speaks directly to young people to discover why some tune in while others tune out - and how America might help them tune back in. Based on discussions with young adults from across the United States, Mindich investigates the decline in news consumption over the past four decades.

If American journalism were a religion, as it has been called, then its supreme deity would be "objectivity." The high priests of the profession worship the concept, while the iconoclasts of advocacy journalism, new journalism, and cyberjournalism consider objectivity a golden calf. Meanwhile, a groundswell of tabloids and talk shows and the increasing infringement of market concerns make a renewed discussion of the validity, possibility, and aim of objectivity a crucial pursuit.

Despite its position as the orbital sun of journalistic ethics, objectivity―until now―has had no historian. David T. Z. Mindich reaches back to the nineteenth century to recover the lost history and meaning of this central tenet of American journalism. His book draws on high profile cases, showing the degree to which journalism and its evolving commitment to objectivity altered–and in some cases limited―the public's understanding of events and issues. Mindich devotes each chapter to a particular component of this ethic–detachment, nonpartisanship, the inverted pyramid style, facticity, and balance. Through this combination of history and cultural criticism, Mindich provides a profound meditation on the structure, promise, and limits of objectivity in the age of cybermedia.

Comments

Naa Naa
David Mindich begins and ends his book with the assertion that objectivity, and the particular instance of journalistic objectivity, are myths that no one believes in outside of contemporary newsrooms. These inter-related assertions of opinion sandwich a historical analysis of how "objectivity" came to be the guiding ethic of American journalism. Unfortunately, apart from a glib reference to Jaques Derrida, and a terribly mistaken point on Albert Einstein, Mindich completely avoids addressing the considerable history of philosophical objectivity in the same historical time-frame. So we end up with a book about a profound philosophical issue reaching philosophical conclusions but absent any real philosophy. Irritating, yes - but also rather ironic: so inimical is "objectivity" to Mindich, he has to forgo any objective claim for the truth of what he says to prevent falling into self-contradiction. Ooops.
Elastic Skunk Elastic Skunk
I bought this book after reading the favorable review in the Christian Science Monitor. It is a useful book for journalists and people interested in media history. Its historical analysis of objectivity is more needed than ever, with journalism getting more sensational by the day.