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eBook Sir Humphry Davy's Published Works ePub

eBook Sir Humphry Davy's Published Works ePub

by June Z. Fullmer

  • ISBN: 0674809610
  • Category: Writing Research and Publishing Guides
  • Subcategory: Reference
  • Author: June Z. Fullmer
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press; 1st edition (January 1, 1969)
  • Pages: 124
  • ePub book: 1921 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1803 kb
  • Other: txt doc lrf mobi
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 873

Description

Fullmer, June Z. Publication date. Davy, Humphry, Sir, 1778-1829 - Bibliography.

Fullmer, June Z. Cambridge, Harvard University Press.

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Start by marking Sir Humphry Davy's Published Works as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. For more than a century it was assumed that the nine-volume Collected Works of Sir Humphry Davy represented the definitive statement of his contributions. That collection does include the major works on which Davy's fame depends; however, many papers were omitted. This annotated bibliography lists Davy's published writings that appeared during his lifetime and posthumously. Translations of Davy's papers and reports of his experimental findings printed prior to the official versions are included.

Similar books and articles. Sir Humphry Davy's Published Works by June Z. Fullmer. June Z Fullmer, Young Humphry Davy: The Making of an Experimental Chemist (Philadelphia, PA: American Philosophical Society, 2000). C. Lawrence - forthcoming - Annals of Science. Christopher Lawrence - 2001 - Annals of Science 1 (1):1-1. Humphry Davy-An Alleged Case of Suppressed Publication.

Sir Humphry Davy (1778-1829) was a leading and controversial member of the international scientific community. Davy was a leading and controversial member of the international scientific community. For that reason the history of his publications is of interest not only for what it reveals of Davy but for what it tells about the fate of scientific news during this period.

Sir Humphry Davy (1778–1829) was a leading and controversial member of the international scientific community. That collection does include the major works on which Davy’s.

June Z. Fullmer, Humphry Sir Davy. 2000 Sir Humphry Davy's Published Works. Sir Humphry Davy's Published Works.

New Biological Books. Ruth Schwartz Cowan, "Sir Humphry Davy's Published Works. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Rethinking the Theoretical Foundation of Sociobiology.

Showing all works by author. Would you like to see only ebooks? Young Humphry Davy.

Sir Humphry Davy's published works by June Z Fullmer( Book .

Part II, which was to cover the rest of science, never appeared. Humphry Davy had a major influence on the history of science and medicine.

Sir Humphry Davy (1778-1829) was a leading and controversial member of the international scientific community. Davy's publications received all the publicity available to an early nineteenth-century scholar. For that reason the history of his publications is of interest not only for what it reveals of Davy but for what it tells about the fate of scientific news during this period.

For more than a century it was assumed that the nine-volume Collected Works of Sir Humphry Davy represented the definitive statement of his contributions. That collection does include the major works on which Davy's fame depends; however, many papers were omitted. This annotated bibliography lists Davy's published writings that appeared during his lifetime and posthumously.

Translations of Davy's papers and reports of his experimental findings printed prior to the official versions are included. Critical reviews in journals not exclusively devoted to scientific subjects have also been catalogued. These translations, reports, and reviews, which frequently forced Davy to further publication, round out the history of his publishing. Through a guide to the location of the first reports of Davy's papers, it is possible to trace the diffusion of scientific news and its reception on the Continent. Fullmer indicates the accuracy of the translations and shows how the changes made by continental editors often distorted Davy's views, and acerbated a scientific atmosphere already ripe with controversy.