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eBook Outwitting Writers' Block: And Other Problems of the Pen ePub

eBook Outwitting Writers' Block: And Other Problems of the Pen ePub

by Jenna Glatzer

  • ISBN: 1592281249
  • Category: Writing Research and Publishing Guides
  • Subcategory: Reference
  • Author: Jenna Glatzer
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Lyons Press; 1st edition (October 1, 2003)
  • Pages: 256
  • ePub book: 1704 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1397 kb
  • Other: doc lrf mobi docx
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 261

Description

Outwitting outwits, outlasts, and outwrites other books on the topic because it's funny, clever, pleasurable (there is. .

Outwitting outwits, outlasts, and outwrites other books on the topic because it's funny, clever, pleasurable (there is even reference to s-e-x. so it's no G-rated book!). Now I've finished praising the "not your typical writer's block fighter" book, I shall go reward myself with a little break away from the computer and writing. Check out her wonderful Absolutewrite. com Web site and newsletter. Just grab a copy of Jenna Glatzer's OUTWITTING WRITER' S BLOCK AND OTHER PROBLEMS OF THE PEN. As an experienced, published writer, Glatzer understands the frustration of having a blank page glare at you.

Outwitting Writer's Block book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Outwitting Writer's Block: And Other Problems of the Pen as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Outwitting Writer's Block: And Other Problems of the Pen as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Outwitting Writer's Block : And Other Problems of the Pe. Having just finished reading Jenna Glatzer's OUTWITTING WRITER'S BLOCK, I'm pleased to report that this book is chock full of innovative, creative, and just-plain-fun tips for all writers, blocked or not.

Outwitting Writers Block. and Other Problems of the Pen. by Jenna Glatzer. Writers are expected to turn to any page in the book for their daily writing prompt. Another book with the same basic idea is The Writers Idea Book by Jack Heffron, Writers Digest Books, 2000). Represented by Djana Pearson Morris Pearson Morris & Belt Literary Management 3000 Connecticut Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20008 (202) 723-6088 dmorrisisbelt. Overview Writers block. Outwitting Writers Block and Other Problems of the Pen will contain prompts and exercises, but it will also contain much more. On Writers Block by Victoria Nelson (Houghton Mifflin, 1993).

and other problems of the pen. Published 2003 by Lyons Press in Guilford, Conn Other Titles. Outwitting writer's block. Published 2003 by Lyons Press in Guilford, Conn. Internet Archive Wishlist, Authorship, Writer's block, Psychological aspects of Authorship, Psychological aspects. Outwitting, Outwitting series.

The Organized Writer Glatzer takes you through the entire freelancing process from ideas to markets to queries and .

The Organized Writer Glatzer takes you through the entire freelancing process from ideas to markets to queries and making the sale. Write 101 What we wouldn’t have given to have had a copy of Jenna Glatzer’s book,Outwitting Writer’s Block hidden under the desk. Entertainment Today Where most books on the subject tend to be drab and instructional, I have to say that Outwitting Writer’s Block was surprisingly entertaining from beginning to end.

com), a popular online magazine for writers. She has written for hundreds of publications, including Prevention, Salon, Woman’s Own, Woman’s World, and Writer’s Digest. She lives in New York City. Библиографические данные.

Jenna Glatzer (Author). From Publishers Weekly. Beginning with plenty of realistic words of caution, veteran freelancer Glazer (Outwitting Writer’s Block and Other Problems of the Pen; Words You Thought You Knew) provides a practical guide for aspiring writers who want to earn a living doing what they love.

But don’t confuse looking for truth with trying to make yourself feel better, warns Jones

You don’t even need to follow it through to its real ending, says essayist and writing consultant Jenna Glatzer, author of Outwitting Writer’s Block and Other Problems of the Pen. Figure out where the most interesting parts end and tie it off there. But don’t confuse looking for truth with trying to make yourself feel better, warns Jones. One of the most common mistakes he finds is when people write to justify their own behavior or opinion, rather than to explore something they don’t understand. And don’t settle for easy answers.

Glatzer has written three books for writers: Outwitting Writer’s Block and Other Problems of the Pen (The Lyons Press, 2003) .

Glatzer has written three books for writers: Outwitting Writer’s Block and Other Problems of the Pen (The Lyons Press, 2003), Make a Real Living as a Freelance Writer (Nomad Press, 2004), and The Street-Smart Writer (Nomad Press, 2006). I wrote to every company I could find to ask if they use freelance material and I put together an ebook about it that has all the markets I could find.

If you've ever found yourself staring at the blank page all day, or cleaning out the refrigerator for the fifth time in a week just to avoid seeing that taunting blinking cursor, then you've experienced writer's block. The good news? It means you're a writer. It's not important that you have these times; what's important is how you deal with them. OUTWITTING WRITER'S BLOCK will provide tricks of the trade to help any writer break through the dreaded block and become a more creative and better writer than before. Filled to the brim with exercises designed to jump-start creativity, encouraging tips from fellow writers and instructors, and tools for analyzing the causes and cures for the nefarious Blank Page syndrome, this book is like Drain-o for clogged creative pipes. Glatzer tells writers how to: * know when an idea isn't going to work, versus when it just needs a new approach; * apply relaxation techniques to get back the nirvana of writing "in flow;" * look at writing like any other job, with set hours and required levels of output; * set up your writing space for optimal performance; * tell if you've chosen the wrong form, and/or if it's time to pick a new genre or media; * knock the editor off your shoulder; * examine other causes--lifestyle changes, depression, stress, etc. that may need to be addressed;* and moreOUTWITTING WRITER'S BLOCK is a humorous, inspirational, practical guide for writers, college students, businesspeople, and those who would like to write as a means of therapy or "release."

Comments

Dianaghma Dianaghma
This is a "Keeper" book. It is well written in a humorous style, easy to read and very helpful. The author covers the subject of writer's block completely. This book would be helpful to everyone, not just writers. I enjoyed it so much I am re-reading it.
Umi Umi
I love the author's work and ideas on writing -- they may work well for some and not for others. This book, though well-written, contained nothing earth-shattering enough to make me run for my pen and paper.
energy breath energy breath
The book came today! Little Guy Books was very fast and the product is in even better condition than advertised. I would definitely use them again.
JUST DO IT JUST DO IT
Blame the pen! That's why we get stuck in a writing rut. Oh, computers? OK, then, blame the broken keys on the keyboard! Meet the enemy and the enemy is us. Writing a book review is always tough because it begins with staring at the ugly blank white page (or other color if you changed it) and you don't want it to sound like the dozen other book reviews you've written with the usual, "I like this book because... the author discusses... in chapter blankity blank..."
Well, I'm going to write that boring phrase and say I like this book because Glatzer writes like a buddy who supports you with humor without the muckity muck or eye-ball rolling advice. It's not a book full of nothing but writing prompts, although she sneaks a few good ones into each chapter. Yes, there are a few exercises, too, but not the running the treadmill until your feet fall off kind except for that one nasty guilt-trippin' reminder saying exercise can help clear the mind.
In a few instances I find myself saying, "Oh yeah, that's happened to me," or "That makes me feel better knowing that." The Myths from the Meanies addresses those hair pulling rules we hear from other writers like we must write every danged day. Relax, it's not written in stone nor is it an unwritten rule. For every myth, you learn why it's a lousy rule and how to deal with it. It took a load off my shoulders.
Do you moan and groan when people speak of yoga, meditation, feng shui, and all that? Those are mentioned in the book. Wait, don't groan yet. I do tire of such talk and the chapter on this talk is needed or it wouldn't be a complete book. It's not so bad and the advice is easy to implement. It's just an itsy bitsy chapter, which also mentions music and animals. How can you not like that? Yyyyyyyyy-M-C-A! At the Yyyyyyyy-M-C-A! Sorry, I got distracted by the music that is helping me work.
Get ready for chills down your spine as we dive into the deadline chapter. Writers know this is a necessary evil of the job, but it's also a good thing. The usual meet your deadlines and pad your schedule advice is there, as well as other good thoughts you might not have otherwise considered.
Feeling guilty for not writing most of the past summer because of an illness, Glatzer eases the pain in Chapter 17: It's Not You, It's Me. Though I'm finally back on track with my writing, thoughts of the lousy summer still eat me. Not anymore, thanks to the chapter. It's OK to go on a hiatus for whatever reason. The tips in the chapter can help most writers get through difficult times.
Usually, I don't enjoy reading about writer's block because I fear it'll make things worse. Outwitting outwits, outlasts, and outwrites other books on the topic because it's funny, clever, pleasurable (there is even reference to s-e-x... so it's no G-rated book!). Now I've finished praising the "not your typical writer's block fighter" book, I shall go reward myself with a little break away from the computer and writing. P.S. Check out her wonderful Absolutewrite.com Web site and newsletter. That's where I first met her and became a fan of her work.
Vushura Vushura
I gave myself two days to read through Jenna Glatzer's "Outwitting Writer's Block" and found myself on the last page within a few hours. This book deals with the nuts and bolts, get-your-hands-greasy-changing-the-flat-`cause-you-didn't-renew-the-AAA-membership approach to overcoming the creative block and also gives insight into the likely deep seated psychological basis from which the block may stem e.g. it just may be your defense mechanism for self-preservation. Don't go to a shrink next time - plunk down the money for this book and Jenna will be beside your couch, gently guiding you through the emotional hurdles that lie between you and your creative potential. It's a kind way to put your harsh inner critic to rest and let the blank page be a "blank canvas" on which you are being invited to play. The fear of writing might just be your friend trying to warn you about something from the past - and it's about time that this fear is addressed and turned into creative fuel. Her suggestion to form a mental literary triumvirate of a critic, an advocate, and a pragmatist is a very useful tool to balance the left brain, the right brain, and the checking account. Power of positive thinking and visualization are some additional aids to keep the critic at bay. The basic message is simple: ultimately, writing is an end in itself and is its own reward; the writer needs to move towards self-validation rather than external validation.
It is a well researched book and I would recommend either highlighting the websites and books recommended or jotting it down in your "dirty notebook" (see, you just did it! You wrote down something!). One idea I found quite intriguing is to give a free outlet to your subconscious while writing without lifting your pen up from the paper (so as to not let the critic have any time to creep in). Of course, if you type, then come up with a creative solution of your own (short of splashing crazy glue on the keyboard).
If nothing else, buy the book for the Prompts - these are the gems strewn across that are fun and practical exercises to help unleash your creativity. I believe that creativity is spiral - something done in one seemingly disparate area feeds into one's writing skills when one least expects it. Jenna exploits this principle to its fullest in this book. Merely reading Jenna's book gave me two new screenplay ideas! And I wasn't even warmed up to do the exercises.
One of the most fundamental suggestions that this book makes is to change one's method of thinking. Although it sounds trite, the suggestion is to think like a writer. How often do we look at the mundane, banal items around us and try to put our thoughts about them into words, into strong nouns and strong verbs? I know I will make a conscious effort now on.
She also addresses what I like to call the "tyranny of should(s)" - a bunch of rules that have outlived their usefulness and float around in writer-speak as the Ten Commandments. However, then, she recommends that you should (oops!) have some rules of your own to bring some discipline to your writing and then, consciously break them if you feel you are getting boxed in e.g. cross genres or discard the self-imposed labels to see if you can have more fun writing - `cause that's what it's all about, ain't it?
Stephen King was asked once where he got his ideas from and he replied, "Cleveland." Jenna makes some specific suggestions on how to reach Cleveland, some of them quite interesting e.g. listening to country lyrics for stories and coming up with character/story ideas based on magazine ads.
Throughout the book, Jenna's love of writing and her passion for the craft shines through even as her lively (and zany) sense of humor guides you through the various ways of conquering writer's block. Even if you are not creatively blocked (and what species do you belong to?), the methods described in the book will jog your creative muscles.