cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The Last Days of Publishing: A Novel
eBook The Last Days of Publishing: A Novel ePub

eBook The Last Days of Publishing: A Novel ePub

by Thomas M. Engelhardt

  • ISBN: 1558495061
  • Category: Writing Research and Publishing Guides
  • Subcategory: Reference
  • Author: Thomas M. Engelhardt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Massachusetts Press (September 21, 2005)
  • Pages: 224
  • ePub book: 1468 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1583 kb
  • Other: doc txt lrf docx
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 670

Description

Engelhardt has written the rarest of books: a truly intellectual novel. Besides being a bit short for a novel, The Last Days of Publishing seems to be missing so many things that could have made for an interesting and readable novel.

Engelhardt has written the rarest of books: a truly intellectual novel. This faux memoir uses the decline of quality book publishing both as landscape and metaphor to explore in ways that are often heartbreaking the failure of the sixties to drastically change the world and the devastating moral and cultural consequences of that failure.

Электронная книга "The Last Days of Publishing: A Novel", Tom Engelhardt

Электронная книга "The Last Days of Publishing: A Novel", Tom Engelhardt. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Last Days of Publishing: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

In the six episodes of The Last Days of Publishing, he refights the Vietnam War in a Chinese restaurant, discovers that the paleontological is political in a natural history museum, mixes it up with a flamboyant literary agent who went.

In the six episodes of The Last Days of Publishing, he refights the Vietnam War in a Chinese restaurant, discovers that the paleontological is political in a natural history museum, mixes it up with a flamboyant literary agent who went underground decades earlier, and encounters a hippie cultural oligarch on the forty-fifth floor of Multimedia's transnational entertainment headquarters.

In the six episodes of The Last Days of Publishing, he refights the Vietnam War in a. .If t Apparently, this book connects better with Baby Boomer bookies and their. Tom Engelhardt, himself a publishing veteran, has produced a tumultuous vision of the new world in which the word finds itself hustling for a living. If t Apparently, this book connects better with Baby Boomer bookies and their elders than with serious readers (and future publishers) in their 20s.

Tom Engelhardt, himself a publishing veteran, has produced a tumultuous vision .

Tom Engelhardt, himself a publishing veteran, has produced a tumultuous vision of the new world in which the word finds itself hustling for a living. In the six episodes of The Last Days of Publishing, he refights the Vietnam War in a Chinese restaurant, discovers that the paleontological is political in a natural history museum, mixes it up with a flamboyant literary agent who went underground decades earlier, and encounters a hippie cultural oligarch on the forty-fifth floor of Multimedia's transnational entertainment headquarters

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Thomas Engelhardt books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Notify me. The Last Days of Publishing.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Thomas Engelhardt books online. Fin de La Cultura de La Victoria.

Tom Engelhardt (Engelhardt, Tom). used books, rare books and new books. The Last Days of Publishing: A Novel: ISBN 9781558495067 (978-1-55849-506-7) Softcover, University of Massachusetts Press, 2005. Find all books by 'Tom Engelhardt' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'Tom Engelhardt'. American Way of War: How Bushs Wars Became Obamas. Mission Unaccomplished: TomDispatch Interviews with American Iconoclasts and Dissenters.

He is the creator of The Nation Institute's tomdispatch. He is also the co-founder of the American Empire Project and the author of the 1998 book, The End of Victory Culture: Cold War America and the Disillusioning of a Generation. Engelhardt graduated from Yale University and then completed a master's degree in East Asian Studies from Harvard University

Taking Back the Word. His books include The End of Victory Culture: Cold War America and the Disillusioning of A Generation, and The Last Days of Publishing, a novel. Noam Chomsky Mar 21, 2002. Leonard Shlain Dec 17, 2008.

Taking Back the Word. Tom is also a Fellow at the Nation Institute.

Engelhardt talked about his book, The Last Days of Publishing: A Novel, published by the University of Massachusetts Press. He also talked about the changes in the publishing industry in recent decades, the effects of large chain bookstores, and the future of the conventional paper book. Following his presentation, he responded to questions from the audience.

Pompeii never had it so bad. Rick Koppes knows a world is ending. The only question is, will he end with it? An editor at Byzantium Press for the last quarter century, he has watched his small, classy publishing house get gobbled up, first by an American publishing giant and then by Multimedia Entertainment, the Hollywood wing of Bruno Hindemann's German media empire. His editing colleagues are being downsized, his authors axed, and in a world where the cultural wallpaper is screaming, he himself hangs on by a fingernail―the latest work of his sole best-selling author, pop psychologist Walter Groth, is racing off bookstore shelves. And that's just where his problems begin―after all, Multimedia is about to make his ex-wife, a publishing executive at another house, his boss, his assistant wants his authors, and a woman who claims her father dropped the bomb on Nagasaki insists he publish her woeful memoir. Koppes, who came of age in the sixties, is an editor slowly running off the rails. In the six episodes of The Last Days of Publishing, he refights the Vietnam War in a Chinese restaurant, discovers that the paleontological is political in a natural history museum, mixes it up with a flamboyant literary agent who went underground decades earlier, and encounters a hippie cultural oligarch on the forty-fifth floor of Multimedia's transnational entertainment headquarters. Tom Engelhardt, himself a publishing veteran, has produced a tumultuous vision of the new world in which the word finds itself hustling for a living. By turns hilarious, sardonic, and poignant, his novel deftly captures the ways in which publishing, which has long put our world between covers but has seldom been memorialized in fiction, is being transformed.

Comments

Frdi Frdi
This sweet gem of a book sets an ambitious goal of elucidating the means by which editors and publishing houses make the invisible decisions that put books in the hands of the reading public. As the title implies, this is a world on the precipice of several calamities: the growth of multimedia corporations that have plundered small publishing houses, as well as ensured the passing of independent book stores. Even more chilling are the emergent technologies that threaten the very idea of what we have come to think of as a book.If a book is not printed paper between two covers, what will it be, and who will write it and produce it? Will writers still be important to fostering provocative thought, or will other technologies eclipse them?

As a reader I want to read imaginative work of refinement and craft, not simply the dross that feeds the entertainment industry of movie, videogame, and retail spin offs that the megalith corporations want to develop. As diversity in the field shrinks to a few major players who control all aspects of our media, will society be well served? The Last Days of Publishing asks us to reflect on all these troubling notions and paints a rather grim landscape of the future terrain.

The tone of this book is sharp, witty and amusing. Rick Koppes, a veteran editor who knows his way around the New York Publishing scene, uses his instincts to stay one step ahead of the opportunistic underlings, and ambitious sharks circling his desk. He offers a tantalizing portrait of what great purpose there can and should be in the role of the editor.

Our beleaguered hero has brought his art to such a high luster, that alas, when it comes to love, he is more editor than scribe. He is dazzled and bemused by the women in his life, but clearly, not in charge of the plot.He is so appreciative of their splendor, so earnest about wanting to be supportive and nurturing to them, he is nearly emasculated."If I were a book", his ex laments, "You would have loved me!" When he finally picks up his pen and risks the act of creation, he finally gains an active part in his own narrative.

Who knows books better than an editor who has been in the trenches for years? He cannot change an entire industry, but can still be a voice of outrage, dissent and courage. This is a cautionary tale of an extremely likable charcter, from an extremely likable writer. The insider oeuvre is sometimes too smooth and glib for its own good; like an inside joke that can't be appreciated by all. But overall, the intelligence and smartness of the writing is sparkling and fresh enough to catch and hold even the most incognizant outsider.
Moronydit Moronydit
Hard to follow... it assumed certain knowledge about the publishing industry I didn't have. One final scene of value... where the inheritors of the industry show their colors--as basically against the "book" in favor of "electroics" because it will allow for advertising!
Malaunitly Malaunitly
This book is a novel written at a time when the book publishing industry was in one of its continuing crisies. It is a novel where the message comes through the discussions and feelings of the anti-hero. His time, and his way of life are ending with the advance of technology and he hasn't/isn't/can't change with it. Everything that has happened in industry in general and publishing in particular has happened to this guy, corporate buyout, downsizing. I particularily like the point of his ex-wife becomming his boss -- that would be enough to drive anyone to severe depression.

With a long history in the publishing industry, Mr. Engelhardt knows the industry of which he writes. He has written a novel that explains better than a dry technical article possibly could about the characters that populate the New York publishing scene. I'd recommend it to anyone in the publishing industry, and to any prospective author that might get a better insight into the world he wants to submit his manuscript.

Of course, the industry has changed, but it hasn't ended. More new books were published last year than any year before. New technologies from print-on-demand to marketing through Amazon have come about and changed the industry.
Aver Aver
What's been happening in book publishing these last 20 or 30 years is most discouraging. As an antidote, I recommend Tom Engelhardt's vivid, lively novel, which helps us see those depressing developments from the inside. He does it, though, with humor and flair--no preachiness here. Reading it, you'll encounter a fascinating gallery of New York City character types. The scene at the Museum of Natural History is unforgettable in its look at cultural-sexual office politics. The whole book is sardonic fun, and a fast, compelling read. I read the entire thing on a Transatlantic flight.
Hap Hap
Although the main character isn't very likable, I enjoyed the inside view of a changing industry. As an author myself, of NEW PSALMS FOR NEW MOMS: A KEEPSAKE JOURNAL (Judson Press), I have some firsthand knowledge of publishing and just how difficult it is for a new voice to be heard. My worst fears of how capriciously some publishing decisions are made were confirmed! But there will always be those of us who have things we must say, and the readers who appreciate hearing them.
Malarad Malarad
Besides being a bit short for a novel, The Last Days of Publishing seems to be missing so many things that could have made for an interesting and readable novel. I have to agree with one of the other reviews, few of the characters are well developed and they seem to come and go, often with minimal explanation. The plot is also weak and presented in out of chronological order, which makes for anticlimactic reading. Much of the information about publishing could easily be gleaned in various magazines and better written books, such as Betsy Lerner's "The Forest for the Trees" as well as the nostalgia for the 60's, like many of Tim O'Brien's novels, especially "July, July" (which isn't even his best novel). Aside from a clever cover, I can't recommend this book.
Haracetys Haracetys
It isn't often that you find a novel as intelligent, original and humorous as it is powerfully poignant. Somehow, though, Engelhardt has written just such a book. The Last Days of Publishing is a crisp and compelling read. In fact, don't be surprised if the story of Rick Koppes, Engelhardt's tragic-hero narrator (and, perhaps the last man of integrity in the increasingly soulless world of publishing) captivates you to the point of reading the novel in one sitting. Yes, it is simply that good.