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eBook How I Found Livingstone (The American journalists) ePub

eBook How I Found Livingstone (The American journalists) ePub

by Henry M. Stanley

  • ISBN: 0405016980
  • Category: Writing Research and Publishing Guides
  • Subcategory: Reference
  • Author: Henry M. Stanley
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Ayer Co Pub (June 1, 1970)
  • Pages: 736
  • ePub book: 1248 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1900 kb
  • Other: lrf mbr azw mobi
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 430

Description

Stanley joined Livingstone in exploring the region, finding that there was no connection between Lake Tanganyika and the Nile African Great Lakes an. .

Stanley joined Livingstone in exploring the region, finding that there was no connection between Lake Tanganyika and the Nile African Great Lakes and Congo River. Main article: Henry Morton Stanley's first trans-Africa exploration. Henry M Stanley with the officers of the Advance Column, Cairo, 1890. From the left: Dr. Thomas Heazle Parke, Robert H. Nelson, Henry M. Stanley, William G. Stairs, and Arthur J. M. Jephson

How I Found Livingstone.

How I Found Livingstone. How i found Livingstone by Henry M Stanley. American journalist and adventurer, Henry M. Stanley recounts his mission in 1871, (on behalf of the New York Herald), to find the world famous explorer David Livingstone, who was presumably lost or even killed in East Africa. In his diary Stanley writes with stoicism, and without magnifying the epic hardships of the journey, (he How i found Livingstone by Henry M Stanley.

American journalist and adventurer, Henry M. In his diary Stanley writes with stoicism, and without magnifying the epic hardships of the journey, (he was deserted by his bearers, plagued by disease and warring tribes).

The book starts when Mr. Stanley (for short) was sent by the manager of the New York Herald, Mr. Bennett James Gordon, on a journey to get news and perhaps bring back Dr. Livingstone, circa 1870-1871. The book is the exerts of Sir Henry Stanley, a journalist who was presented with the task of finding Dr. Livingstone, an explorer who had been missing for two years and presumed dead. Stanley's travels were documented by his newspaper, to much fanfare.

How I Found Livingstone was published soon after Stanley’s arrival in England in the late summer of 1872 .

How I Found Livingstone was published soon after Stanley’s arrival in England in the late summer of 1872, when the exploits of this hitherto unknown adventurer gave rise to controversy. Members of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS) resented an American journalist having succeeded in relieving the famous traveler when they, his friends, had failed. Stanley did, however, receive the RGS Patron’s Gold Medal

How I Found Livingstone (Wordsworth Classics of World Literature)

How I Found Livingstone (Wordsworth Classics of World Literature). With an Introduction by Beau Riffenburgh ) With an Introduction by Beau Riffenburgh. If you enjoy the works of Henry M. (Henry Morton) Stanley then we highly recommend this publication for your book collection. MO4DA/?tag prabook0b-20. Upon finding Livingstone, Stanley reportedly asked, "Dr. Livingstone, I presume?"

Henry M. Stanley is famously quoted for saying "Dr Livingstone, i Presume?". Born in Wales, he migrated over to the United States at the age of 18, he eventually became an overseas correspondent for the New York Herald. In 1869 Stanley was told by James Gordon Bennett Jr to find Livingstone, a scottish missionary and explorer.

Dr. Livingstone was a 19th century Christian explorer whose dream it was to discover the sources of the rivers in Egypt, and particularly, the headwaters of the Nile.

How I Found Livingstone Travels, Adventures and Discoveries in Central Africa including four months residence .

How I Found Livingstone Travels, Adventures and Discoveries in Central Africa including four months residence with Dr. Livingstone. Henry Morton Stanley. Last updated Saturday, October 24, 2015 at 21:30. eBooksaide The University of Adelaide Library University of Adelaide South Australia 5005. Table of Contents Next →.

Stanley participated reluctantly in the American Civil War, first joining the Confederate .

Stanley participated reluctantly in the American Civil War, first joining the Confederate Army participating in the Battle of Shiloh in 1862. After being taken prisoner he promptly deserted and joined the Union. He served in the Navy but eventually deserted again. Stanley joined Livingstone in exploring the region, establishing for certain that there was no connection between Lake Tanganyika and the River Nile. On his return, he wrote a book about his experiences : How I Found Livingstone; travels, adventures, and discoveries in Central Africa. This brought him into the public eye and gave him some financial success.

Comments

Risteacor Risteacor
How I Found Livingstone; travels, adventures, and discoveries in Central Africa, including an account of…
By Henry M. (Henry Morton) Stanley

The book starts when Mr. Stanley (for short) was sent by the manager of the “New York Herald”, Mr. Bennett
James Gordon, on a journey to get news and perhaps bring back Dr. Livingstone , circa 1870-1871.
Preparation for such a journey began in Zanzibar and had to be thought out and planned.
The trip seems to go through endless country with interesting views and experiences, Such as one would encounter in the vastness of Africa .They paid tariffs to the tribal chiefs along the way by taking portions from rolls of cloth and beads they had brought with them to give to the chiefs.
The caravan could go no further than Unyanyembe because of an impending war brought on by Mirambo a renegade chieftain. It was heard that Livingston had traveled that way and it was hoped that he may have passed that way before the hostilities began.
A band of Arabs was sent out to war against the renegade tribe but were unsuccessful and had to retreat. After traveling West they had to go West via a Southern route and arrived at Ujiji where Dr. Livingston was reported to be.
Travel was accomplished by caravan hiking maybe 10 or 15 miles per day and then camping by night.
Although Dr. Livingstone made missionary travels, his later ambition was to find the head waters of the Nile . Dr. Livingston discovered that the Chambezi river what the most southern tributary of the Nile. The book gives account of Dr. Livingston’s explorations as far back as 1866.
Lake Tanganika being the Southern most reservoir of the Nile was explored by Mr. Stanley and Dr. Livingstone before Mr. Stanley returned to Zanzibar. When in Zanzibar Mr. Stanley was to gather up men and arms for Livingston’s continued exploration as he was in need of porters. Dr. Livingston had ambition of searching out the source of the Nile before he considered returning to civilization.
The description of the country side leaves one in awe as to the beauty and vistas that Africa offers. The different obsticles they encountered and overcoming them keeps one riveted to the book.
olgasmile olgasmile
The book is the exerts of Sir Henry Stanley, a journalist who was presented with the task of finding Dr. Livingstone, an explorer who had been missing for two years and presumed dead. Stanley's travels were documented by his newspaper, to much fanfare. Stanley had no clue about central Africa, what to pack, what to expect, and ends up facing what you'd expect in Africa: harsh conditions, diseases, natives who don't appreciate him being on their land, and jungles that he was no equipped for. It is a tale of lively tale of struggles and intrigue, a very good read.
Daigami Daigami
Though no longer the sensational best-seller it was at the time it was published, the book remains well-worth reading. I was particularly impressed by the author's determination and ability to overcome the most formidable obstacles. As Stanley himself put it, “where the civilized white is found, a difficulty must vanish." What a contrast with the present, when almost every time the armed forces of Western nations try to do something in the so-called Third World they are defeated and expelled
Weiehan Weiehan
Stanley's first hand description of his trek through the dark continent, as it was known at that time, is a delightful read. More than the famous quote "Dr. Livingstone I presume", the book is an eye opener to the strength and endurance those well known adventurers had to have to survive day to day, let alone the months and months of slow tedious travel they were forced to withstand.

I don't think I'll complain about traffic or the price of gas anymore, the men that took on these expeditions were made of much greater stuff than I could ever hope to be. Do yourself a favor and enjoy this amazing true tale.
Talrajas Talrajas
I really liked this book but I gave 4 stars because he often seem to ramble into other stories. It was not hard to follow but I thought is had to many hmmmmmm asides I guess. But the look into Africa and the their way of life and especially the way they were thought of at the time and most especially the way they treated. I know that today it is still often thought that way and about our African-Americans here in the USA. It was hard to read because of the frankness in the truth. I do whole heartedly recommend this book to everyone. It should be required reading.
Zargelynd Zargelynd
I don't think I'd like to have Stanley exploring my part of the world, but this is a really remarkable and nitty-gritty account. I read a lot of fantasy adventure stories but at the end of those one can always say--"Well, that was kind of silly." But here's the true story (within the limitations of Stanley trying to puff himself up, no doubt) of a guy organizing an expedition into almost totally unknown territory, living through disease, tribal warfare, lions, tsetse flies, slave caravans, starvation and lots of colorful tribal characters. And in the end finding a guy he comes to regard as almost a saint. I highly recommend this book.