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eBook Lapsing Into a Comma: A Curmudgeon's Guide to the Many Things That Can Go Wrong in Print - and How to Avoid Them ePub

eBook Lapsing Into a Comma: A Curmudgeon's Guide to the Many Things That Can Go Wrong in Print - and How to Avoid Them ePub

by Bill Walsh

  • ISBN: 0965161358
  • Category: Writing Research and Publishing Guides
  • Subcategory: Reference
  • Author: Bill Walsh
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Contemporary Books; Book Club edition (2000)
  • Pages: 256
  • ePub book: 1896 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1897 kb
  • Other: mobi lit lrf docx
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 669

Description

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Every author should probably have this book on their nightstands, and read a chapter every night before going to bed. That’s where my copy is now. Plus a copy of The Elephants of Style by the same author – Bill Walsh. This book should be every author’s bible. To be honest, the title of the book gave away that it is brilliant.

Lapsing Into a Comma book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Lapsing Into a Comma book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Lapsing Into a Comma: A Curmudgeon's Guide to the Many Things That Can Go Wrong in Print-And How to Avoid Them as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This style guide, written by Bill Walsh of the Washington Post,is as clever and fun as its title, though I doubt many people . My plan had been to keep it up until my birthday (3 weeks away) and then decide whether to go public or quit.

This style guide, written by Bill Walsh of the Washington Post,is as clever and fun as its title, though I doubt many people would agree. I should start by confessing that I like to read dictionaries, and I enjoy learning about grammar. I realize you’re so bored at this point that you’ve either stopped reading or fallen asleep. I’m on the verge of giving up on this blogging business anyway, having not admitted its existence to anyone but my husband, so you are probably never going to read this in the first place.

The second half is Walsh's personally crafted style guide.

Bill Walsh, copy chief for the Washington Post's business desk, addresses these shortcomings in Lapsing into a. .Bill has very sensible stylistic rules.

Bill Walsh, copy chief for the Washington Post's business desk, addresses these shortcomings in Lapsing into a Comma. In an opinionated, humorous, and yes, curmudgeonly way, he shows how to apply the basic rules to unique, modern grammar issues. Walsh explains how to deal with perplexing situations such as trendy words, foreign terms, and web speak. A good book to have next to you if you are writing something in the journalistic form.

Comments

Morad Morad
Every author should probably have this book on their nightstands, and read a chapter every night before going to bed. That’s where my copy is now. Plus a copy of “The Elephants of Style” by the same author – Bill Walsh. This book should be every author’s “bible.”

To be honest, the title of the book gave away that it is brilliant. The word play is clever but more importantly, it hints at that Bill Walsh encourages his readers TO THINK.

Chapter 1 is titled,” Beyond Search and Replace, Using Your Head as Well as Your Stylebook.” Walsh warns, “Be skeptical of stylebooks.” And, he takes things from there.

Walsh dedicates a lot of space to covering “He or she,” “him or her”, “his or her,” “his or hers; he also covers profanity and “physical descriptions.” This is information all of us can use.

Which can be explained very quickly when reading the section, “Dirty Mind, Clean Copy, Why Every Copy Desk Could Use a 13-Year-Old Boy.

[quote] “....In trying to think of a headline for a reporter’s first-person account of the wonders of his Palm hand-held computer (they’re no longer called Palm Pilots) my first idea was ‘A Man and His Palm: A Love Story.”...”

Yes, this style book is funny, too. Very funny. Reading this book, you’ll think about things you never thought about. A good example: The difference between Preschool and Pre-school. pre-school is an adjective that means “before school.” And – the term pre-school-age children might also refer to newborns. Right. I knew that, so why did I use these words incorrectly, at least half a dozen times?

Naturally, I also found out that I made an error in my last book (and my editor did not see it). In my book I wrote, “Presently, Johnny sang his signature song...”
This was the first time, I used the word “presently” in any book (and I have written more than twenty.) Walsh advises, “PRESENTLY The traditional meaning is “in a short while.” Avoid using it as a synonym for “currently.”

Can you see why you need to read this book?

Finally, as a boxing fan, I want to give a shout-out to Bill Walsh for using many examples from the world of boxing. All are well-chosen (and rare).

For instance, in the section “African-American” vs. “Black,’ Walsh writes, “ There is no racial difference between African-Americans and African-Canadians, so how can African-American constitute a race? I suppose you could refer to boxer Frank Bruno as an African-Briton, ...

5 stars, I am a fan,
Gisela Hausmann, author and blogger
Snowskin Snowskin
Bill Walsh, the Washington Post's copy editor for national news, is an unabashed "prescriptivist" -- someone for whom, in writing, there are things that are wrong because they've always been wrong. "Even if you think it's arrogant to condemn a perfectly understandable bit of prose as 'wrong,'" he writes, "you have to answer one big question: Do you want to look stupid?"
With "The Elephants of Style" you'll reduce the chance of sounding stupid, increase the likelihood that your writing will have style -- or, as Walsh puts it, FLAIR! ELAN! PANACHE! -- and have a lot of fun. "The Elephants of Style" is the rare book about writing and style that you may (as I did) read from cover to cover for sheer pleasure -- like the pleasure of learning that "the New York train station is Grand Central Terminal," but "Grand Central Station remains the correct expression for mothers yelling at their kids about running in and out of the kitchen."
I'll admit it: I'm one of those lovers of English who has shelves full of books about writing and the use of our language. I regularly read Walsh's website "The Slot: A Spot for Copy Editors," and I also purchased his first book, "Lapsing Into a Comma," which also was a delight. "Lapsing" was aimed at an audience of more sophisticated word users or, as Walah says, was written for editors and writers. "Elephants of Style," he says, was written for writers and editors. It will benefit everyone, I say, from professional writers and editors to middle-school English students. I recommend it highly.
Arabella V. Arabella V.
This may go beyond what the typical office worker needs to know about style as it is heavily weighted toward newspaper writing. The author is a copy editing guy, (ok, THE copy editing guy) at the Washington Post. But there is plenty of information on common usage as well. Sometimes the errors we make (or we all have other people TELL us we are making) are just a matter of personal preference. Bill Walsh has his own strong preferences but also allows that other usages are not necessarily incorrect. (He is often at odds with the AP stylebook.) I like his approach and find that he provides excellent comparisons and reasoning for what we read and hear every day. Useful and funny too.
Saberblade Saberblade
Wonderful guide to proper use of grammar; answered many questions about good sentence structure and clear expression of the writer's thoughts.
The Elephants of Style is also a necessary guide for writers and proofreaders. Bill Walsh does an exemplary job of clearly explaining the reasons behind correct usage.
Thank you.
Andriodtargeted Andriodtargeted
This book is helpful for people who write, proof, and edit. I like books that teach me something, but make it entertaining at the same time. This is written by the copy desk chief of the Business Desk at the Washington Post. I am still going through the book, but so far the most useful chapter has been the one on electronic media and terminology. Good book!