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eBook Fragile Edge ePub

eBook Fragile Edge ePub

by Maria Coffey

  • ISBN: 0701134070
  • Category: Writing Research and Publishing Guides
  • Subcategory: Reference
  • Author: Maria Coffey
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Chatto & Windus; First Edition edition (October 1, 1990)
  • Pages: 192
  • ePub book: 1334 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1712 kb
  • Other: mobi mbr lrf lrf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 764

Description

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In May 1982, Maria Coffey's lover, Joe Tasker disappeared from a ridge on the East-North-East face with Pete Boardman in a bid for the summit of Everest.

Such clarity and honesty are seldom seen in mountain writing.

Maria Coffey is originally from England, and now lives on a small island in British Columbia. She and her husband Dag Goering spend part of each year in Ireland, where Dag practises as a large animal veterinarian. They also work as professional sea-kayaking and trekking guides, leading trips in Vietnam, the Solomon Islands, Ireland and Canada. Coffey is the author of a number of internationally published books, including A Boat in Our Baggage, Three Moons in Vietnam, Sailing Back in Time and two books for children, A Cat in a Kayak and A Seal in the Family.

Start by marking Fragile Edge: A Personal Portrait of Loss on Everest as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Fragile Edge: A Personal Portrait of Loss on Everest as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Greg Child, author of Postcards from the Ledge Critically acclaimed Fragile Edge won the coveted the International Literary Mountain prize for Maria Coffey's eloquently written story of how climbing tragedies affect those who are left behind.

An intimate story of personal cost, risk, and loss in the mountaineering world.

Published 1990 by Coronet in Sevenoaks Maria Coffey (1952-). Everest, Mount (China and Nepal), Great Britain.

Published 1990 by Coronet in Sevenoaks. Mountaineers, Protected DAISY, In library, Biography, Mountaineering. Maria Coffey (1952-). Originally published: London : Chatto & Windus, 1989.

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Fragile Edge : Loss on Everest. Such clarity and honesty are seldom seen in mountain writing.

Fragile Edge by Maria Coffey - Hodder & Stoughton General Division - ISBN 10 0340525436 - ISBN 13. .Read Christopher McDougall's new book, Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen. Published on 2009-05-05.

Fragile Edge by Maria Coffey - Hodder & Stoughton General Division - ISBN 10 0340525436 - ISBN 13 0340525436 - I was in love with a man wh. ind this Pin and more on Sports & Outdoors by Kidaoo Lifestyle Books. Elaine LAB. Most influential Sports Books Ever Written.

In May 1982, Maria Coffey's lover, Joe Tasker disappeared from a ridge on the East-North-East face with Pete Boardman in a bid for the summit of Everest. This book is an account of Maria's expedition across the world, retracing the steps of Joe's final journey.

Comments

Opimath Opimath
What happens to the loved ones of mountaineers who perish while seeking to climb higher peaks or pioneer new routes on challenging mountains? The author attempts to answer this question with her well written and deeply personal account.

The author was intimately involved in the mountaineering world of the nineteen seventies and early nineteen eighties. At the time she was in the throes of an intense love affair with Joe Trasker, the British climber who perished in 1982 with his regular climbing partner, Peter Boardman, while attempting to climb the then unclimbed Northeast ridge of Everest.

The author offers an intriguing, birdseye view into the tight circle of the mountaineering elite through her relationship with Joe Trasker. The book, however, is not about climbing, per se. It is more of a personal catharsis of her relationship with Joe Trasker.

Still, this makes for an interesting read. The book is divided into two parts. The first concerns itself with the Joe that was living. The second part concerns itself with the Joe that had perished.

The first part chronicles their relationship, which was intense. It also seemed to be a little one sided. The author makes it fairly clear to the reader that Joe Trasker did not seem to have the same commitment to the relationship that the author seems to have had. Her reluctance to let the relationship go appears to have been based more upon what the relationship could have been, rather than upon what it actually was. As they say, love is blind.

The second part of the book chronicles her coming to terms with his death. She does this by joining up with Peter Boardman's widow, Hilary, and setting off on a journey to Tibet and, ultimately, to Everest in an attempt to connect to Joe one final time, as well as to seek closure to a part of her life that was no more.

Sensitively written and finely drawn, her pain is palpable and her story moving. It is, above all, a fitting tribute to Joe Trasker, the man who inspired such devotion.
Quamar Quamar
What happens to the loved ones of mountaineers who perish while seeking to climb higher peaks or pioneer new routes on challenging mountains? The author attempts to answer this question with her well written and deeply personal account.

The author was intimately involved in the mountaineering world of the nineteen seventies and early nineteen eighties. At the time she was in the throes of an intense love affair with Joe Trasker, the British climber who perished in 1982 with his regular climbing partner, Peter Boardman, while attempting to climb the then unclimbed Northeast ridge of Everest.

The author offers an intriguing, birds-eye view into the tight circle of the mountaineering elite through her relationship with Joe Trasker. The book, however, is not about climbing, per se. It is more of a personal catharsis of her relationship with Joe Trasker.

Still, this makes for an interesting read. The book is divided into two parts. The first concerns itself with the Joe that was living. The second part concerns itself with the Joe that had perished.

The first part chronicles their relationship, which was intense. It also seemed to be a little one sided. The author makes it fairly clear to the reader that Joe Trasker did not seem to have the same commitment to the relationship that the author seems to have had. Her reluctance to let the relationship go appears to have been based more upon what the relationship could have been, rather than upon what it actually was. As they say, love is blind.

The second part of the book chronicles her coming to terms with his death. She does this by joining up with Peter Boardman's widow, Hilary, and setting off on a journey to Tibet and, ultimately, to Everest in an attempt to connect to Joe one final time, as well as to seek closure to a part of her life that was no more.

Sensitively written and finely drawn, her pain is palpable and her story moving. It is, above all, a fitting tribute to Joe Trasker, the man who inspired such devotion.
Munimand Munimand
What happens to the loved ones of mountaineers who perish while seeking to climb higher peaks or pioneer new routes on challenging mountains? The author attempts to answer this question with her well written and deeply personal account.
The author was intimately involved in the mountaineering world of the nineteen seventies and early nineteen eighties. At the time she was in the throes of an intense love affair with Joe Trasker, the British climber who perished in 1982 with his regular climbing partner, Peter Boardman, while attempting to climb the then unclimbed Northeast ridge of Everest.
The author offers an intriguing, birdseye view into the tight circle of the mountaineering elite through her relationship with Joe Trasker. The book, however, is not about climbing, per se. It is more of a personal catharsis of her relationship with Joe Trasker.
Still, this makes for an interesting read. The book is divided into two parts. The first concerns itself with the Joe that was living. The second part concerns itself with the Joe that had perished.
The first part chronicles their relationship, which was intense. It also seemed to be a little one sided. The author makes it fairly clear to the reader that Joe Trasker did not seem to have the same commitment to the relationship that the author seems to have had. Her reluctance to let the relationship go appears to have been based more upon what the relationship could have been, rather than upon what it actually was. As they say, love is blind.
The second part of the book chronicles her coming to terms with his death. She does this by joining up with Peter Boardman's widow, Hilary, and setting off on a journey to Tibet and, ultimately, to Everest in an attempt to connect to Joe one final time, as well as to seek closure to a part of her life that was no more.
Sensitively written and finely drawn, her pain is palpable and her story moving. It is, above all, a fitting tribute to Joe Trasker, the man who inspired such devotion.