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eBook Unbuttoned: Women Open Up About the Pleasures, Pains, and Politics of Breastfeeding ePub

eBook Unbuttoned: Women Open Up About the Pleasures, Pains, and Politics of Breastfeeding ePub

by Maureen Connolly

  • ISBN: 155832397X
  • Category: Family Relationships
  • Subcategory: Relationships
  • Author: Maureen Connolly
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harvard Common Press (April 17, 2009)
  • Pages: 240
  • ePub book: 1430 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1125 kb
  • Other: doc rtf lit doc
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 579

Description

The stories in Unbuttoned are wonderful for breastfeeding mothers. It depicts the loves and pains of bf'ing very well and it helps with getting into the grove with baby

The stories in Unbuttoned are wonderful for breastfeeding mothers. It depicts the loves and pains of bf'ing very well and it helps with getting into the grove with baby. It helps you feel more normal and that all the goofy issues you have as a new mom bf'ing, are normal! I loved the read and recommend it to any new breastfeeding mom.

Unbuttoned talks a lot about the pains of breastfeeding, but was real light on the pleasures. Essentially, almost every essay boiled down to this: breastfeeding is OK, but don't do it for too long and if you don't want to, who cares, because it doesn't make much of a difference anyway. Huh? The only positive essays were the ones on weaning, towards the end of the book.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. A collection of women's thoughts about the pleasures, pains, and politics of breastfeeding. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Houghton Mifflin HarcourtReleased: Apr 17, 2009ISBN: 9781558326149Format: book. Unbuttoned; Women Open Up About the Pleasures, Pains, and Politics of Breastfeeding - Dana Sullivan.

Sullivan, Dana; Connolly, Maureen. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio).

Unbuttoned: Women Open Up About the Pleasures, Pains, and Politics of Breastfeeding, contains revealing essays from 25 moms who talk about . The Times-Union calls Unbuttoned, "A Breastfeeding Book You MUST Have!"

Unbuttoned: Women Open Up About the Pleasures, Pains, and Politics of Breastfeeding, contains revealing essays from 25 moms who talk about their personal breastfeeding experiences. Unbuttoned: Women Open Up About the Pleasures, Pains, and Politics of Breastfeeding, contains revealing essays from 25 moms who talk about their personal breastfeeding experiences. April 29, 2009 ·. The Times-Union calls Unbuttoned, "A Breastfeeding Book You MUST Have!" I'm not a trust-my-instincts kind of parent, but one you'll find Googling diaper rash at 2 .

book by Dana Sullivan. Women persecuted for breastfeeding in public, women struggling to give their child the care they need, and other topics are presented

book by Dana Sullivan. Women persecuted for breastfeeding in public, women struggling to give their child the care they need, and other topics are presented. Unbuttoned" is a top pick, especially recommended for new mothers. Most wonderful heartwarming book. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 10 years ago. This book has something for everyone. The fanatic nursers, the middle of the road and non nursers. It is such a beautifully and well written book.

She is the author of three books, including The Essential C-Section Guide and Unbuttoned: Women Open Up About the Pleasures, Pains and Politics of Breastfeeding. This information is not designed to replace a physician's independent judgment about the appropriateness or risks of a procedure for a given patient. Always consult your doctor about your medical conditions. Remedy Health Media & PsyCom do not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Remedy Health Media, LLC. Get our Free eNewsletter!

Электронная книга "If These Boobs Could Talk: A Little Humor to Pump Up the Breastfeeding Mom", Shannon Payette Seip.

Электронная книга "If These Boobs Could Talk: A Little Humor to Pump Up the Breastfeeding Mom", Shannon Payette Seip. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "If These Boobs Could Talk: A Little Humor to Pump Up the Breastfeeding Mom" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Unbuttoned: Women Open Up About the Pleasures, Pains, and Politics of Breastfeeding, Dana Sullivan and Maureen Connolly (Harvard Press, 2009). Individual essays from women on every aspect of nursing, including topics such as latching on, milk production, and weaning your child. The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding. The Ultimate Breastfeeding Book of Answers Jack Newman, .

A woman’s message about the harsh reality of breastfeeding has gone viral after resonating with mums all over the world. This photo depicts my reality of this breastfeeding journey so far & that first latch & the pain I endure. If you’re a mother, chances are in the early days you heard a lot about what it’s like to breastfeed. How it’s such an incredible bonding experience and provides your little one with all the nutrition they need.

A collection of women's thoughts about the pleasures, pains, and politics of breastfeeding.

Comments

Quphagie Quphagie
I bought this book before I had my first child and started reading it in the early weeks of nursing. Well, as all mothers know, I was very emotional at this time and could not read a section of this book without crying. I still go back to the first memoir and laugh and then cry as the author compares her son to a vacuum cleaner and then a nail gun (mine is a piranha) and then she describes a moment when her child is passed out swollen lips and all from breastfeeding (the completely stuffed and satisfied look only breastfed babies get.) I was getting ready to give up breastfeeding and was having a really hard time seeing any positive in the painful nursing sessions. I now feel like my son and I have a special, painfully happy secret that no one else will ever get to experience. Even our 4 night time feeding sessions make me feel like I am the lucky one to get to wake up with him and satisfy him in a way no one will ever be able to do but me.

I do have to say however, that I stopped reading a few of these memoirs because they were a little weird and i couldn't really relate. But the good parts are worth buying the book.
Pooker Pooker
I am currently reading this book and loving it! It has very truthful stories without being negative. It has made me realize that my experience with breastfeeding my first child was normal and there are other people that went through similar experiences...at the time I felt so alone and gave up. I wish I would have had this book (and the book: The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding)two years ago. I don't think I would have given up after only 6 weeks.
Vetalol Vetalol
The stories in Unbuttoned are wonderful for breastfeeding mothers. It depicts the loves and pains of bf'ing very well and it helps with getting into the grove with baby. It helps you feel more normal and that all the goofy issues you have as a new mom bf'ing, are normal! I loved the read and recommend it to any new breastfeeding mom.
Yndanol Yndanol
I bought this book after reading about it in a magazine, think it was Parents. Anyway, the book was very inciteful. It is a compilation of short stories/personal experiences with breastfeeding. There are many stories in the book that really make you laugh out loud. it was very refreshing to read a book on the subject that did not paint it in an all positive, "Snow white and singing birds " type of light. I thought it allowed the reader to understand that not everyone has the easiest time, nor even enjoys breasfeeding and that it is there choice to pursue or forgoe breastfeeding altogether.
Tisicai Tisicai
Having felt somewhat ambivalent about breastfeeding (after nursing my daughter for 4.5 months), I felt this book had a good range of opinions, from women who loved it and did it for years, and from women who couldn't get nursing really going. It was a well rounded range of opinions and I enjoyed this book thoroughly.
Thetath Thetath
I just got done reading this after recently weaning my 15 month old. Wow! What a great book. I don't normally love essays but I just wanted to keep reading the next one and the next one and the next one. I will admit that there were 2 or 3 essays that I didn't particularly care for, but they were all pretty quick reads, so I wouldn't consider them a waste of time.

With any series of essays by different authors, you will have differing styles and differing opinions, so I figure there's bound to be a few that you can't relate to at all. I'm sure another reader will find the essays that I didn't like to be his/her favorites!

The authors of these essays were able to put into words the feelings that I had as I went through the process of learning how to nurse, dealing with the pain, dealing with infections, and finally weaning.

I am not a writer AT ALL, so it was wonderful to read how these women were able to capture the emotional highs and lows that women go through during this period - whether they nurse/supplement/formula feed. There is definitely something in this book for everyone.

Again, you might not like all the essays, but I can almost guarantee that if you're a mom, there will be one or two that you will relate to.
Berenn Berenn
I started with the last chapter, because my son has recently turned two and weaning is in sight. The stories were beautiful, bittersweet, and I found myself getting teary more than once, particularly when reading Catherine Newman's "Wean." In fact, just looking up the story, to get the author's name, my eyes fell on a particular paragraph and again I find myself close to weeping. Unfortunately, starting with the wonderful final chapter means that I finish with the "quitting" chapter. Similar only in that there is an end (or, in one case, no beginning at all), but completely different in their relevance to nursing mothers who would be interested in this type of book, the book would be much better if the entire chapter was removed. While some of the mothers in earlier chapters made some frustrating comments, I was able to just roll my eyes and still enjoy bits of their stories. The "On Empty" moms, however, either sounded like they likely had post partum depression, or were grasping for reasons why they couldn't do it. One seemed to imply that society wanted to place women back in the 1950s by making it impossible to be a working mother while nursing. I take great offense to this notion, as I successfully returned to work when my eldest son was four months old, pumping twice a day until shortly after his second birthday, never giving him a drop of formula. I don't fault mothers who are forced to supplement with formula; pumping is hard and definitely doesn't work for everyone. But I'd rather see stories of women who SUCCEED (whether or not formula comes into play) rather than give up entirely - I want a pep talk, not a cold reality check from someone who hasn't REALLY "been there, done that." I think that I'll go back and re-read "Wean" so that I feel like I finish on a high note. And I recommend skipping "On Empty" completely.