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eBook The Riddle-Master of Hed ePub

eBook The Riddle-Master of Hed ePub

by Patricia A. McKillip

  • ISBN: 0708880517
  • Category: Fantasy
  • Subcategory: Science Fiction
  • Author: Patricia A. McKillip
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Orbit / Futura; 1st British paperback edition (1979)
  • Pages: 240
  • ePub book: 1823 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1174 kb
  • Other: doc txt mbr mobi
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 820

Description

Cover art by Kinuko Y. Craft. This book, or parts thereof, may not be reproduced in any form without permission.

For over twenty years, Patricia A. McKillip has captured the hearts. The Prince of Hed, Morgon, had a talent for riddles and had decided to try to win a crown from the dead Lord of Aum. However, Morgon had awoken something sibilant by his riddling. Ancient evils were stirring.

Reading "The Riddle-Master of Hed" is like trying to solve the riddle of someone else's partially-glimpsed dream. You enter a rich world of metaphor, sometimes baffling but always beautiful. A standard hero's quest is overgrown with fabulous beasts, children of stone, and death-dealing harps. When Land-Ruler Morgon of Hed wins a bride and a crown in a riddling contest with a ghost, he wipes the cow manure off of his boots and sets sail from his tiny island kingdom.

The Riddle-Master of Hed book.

The Riddle-Master of Hed is a fantasy novel by American writer Patricia A. McKillip. It is the first book of the Riddle Master Trilogy, the following two books being Heir of Sea and Fire and Harpist in the Wind. It was published in 1976. The trilogy makes use of a number of themes from Celtic mythology. It takes place in a fantasy world divided into a number of countries. Each ruler has a mystical awareness of his or her land: the land-rule.

Patricia A. McKillip (1948 - ) Patricia Anne McKillip was born on February 29th, 1948, in Salem, Oregon. She is the acclaimed author of many fine fantasy novels for children and adults, including The Forgotten Beasts of Eld and Ombria in Shadow - both of which won the World Fantasy Award - The Sorceress and the Cygnet, Winter Rose and Harpist in the Wind, which was shortlisted for both the Hugo and World Fantasy Awards.

Fandoms: Riddle-Master Trilogy - Patricia A. As the first Prince of Hed to ever leave the island, Morgon is afraid that his new roommate at the College of Riddlemasters will think him an ignorant farmer. Major Character Death. Gen. Work in Progress. Words: 778. Chapters: 1/1.

The riddle-master of Hed. by. McKillip, Patricia A. Publication date. New York : Ballantine Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

In seeking the answer to the riddle of the three stars on his forehead and the three stars on the enchanted harp and sword, Morgon, Prince of Hed, goes ultimately to the High One, himself

Comments

Folsa Folsa
It is an old series that has some real twists and turns. I have read them several times over the years.
Shem Shem
This is simply one of the best books out there. Read it today!!
Lucam Lucam
Couldn't seem to get back into it. One of these days. I suppose you have to be in the right mood.
Olma Olma
A poorly written book with no redeeming qualities.
Zorve Zorve
I read this partly in a paperback copy and partly in an e-copy borrowed from the library (the e-copy was Riddle-Master with all 3 books in the trilogy put together). I think that readers with a paper copy may be at a slight advantage as there are some nicely drawn maps in the paperback edition that might help you follow the geography/path of travel if this is something that matters to you.

I struggled to keep going with this book. It's actually fairly short, weighing in at just around 200 pages, which seems tiny by today's standards. Despite that, this book read very slowly to me as a result of the author's style. She likes to describe things that are happening rather than telling you. Normally I enjoy this, but in this case she uses a lot of metaphysical/imagery type language rather than just laying out what's going on. It makes it hard to follow the action on more than one occasion.

The basic premise is we meet Morgon who is the Price of Hed. Hed is a pretty small, rural kingdom and so being a prince there doesn't seem to be that big of a deal. Until Morgon inherited Hed he was studying at the college of the Riddle-Masters and was an exceptional student there. Riddles in this context really seem to just be history and the lessons you learn from those historical events.

Anyway, as the book goes on, you discover Morgon has a Fate that he doesn't want to pursue but he ends up having to follow anyway. He spends the vast majority of the book wandering from kingdom to kingdom and picking up random helpful skills. There's a big plot twist/reveal literally on the last two pages of the book which set up the sequel.

I had several problems with this book that I haven't already touched on: 1) The protagonist spends an inordinate amount of time wandering from location to location without really advancing the plot a whole lot; 2) Everywhere he goes, magically he immediately finds the king of whatever land he's in and they know him and can't do enough to help him out. There are apparently 5 commoners in the entire kingdom and a whole slew of traders and then just lots of kings and queens; 3) Why is everyone bending over backwards for this guy? His supposed "fate" was hidden from him and everyone else, so there seems to be a real disconnect in the logic; 4) The author seems really enamored of having things happen in mystical dream sequences and then surprise, the character wakes up and some part/all of the dream really happened.

Despite all my complaining, something about the book did appeal to me and after the big plot reveal I went ahead and started book 2, Heir of Sea and Fire (which, incidentally, is moving along a little faster though it does so far have some of the same wandering around the landscape for no reason issues).
olgasmile olgasmile
Like the best of fantasy, The Riddle-Master of Hed reads like a beautiful dream. And the reluctant warrior at its center, fated to be a powerful figure of prophecy despite all his wishes for a quiet life back home, makes for a compelling hero. But the worldbuilding is maddeningly opaque here, such that the reader can feel the subtleties eluding us every time a character speaks. It adds to the hazy dreamlike quality of the text, but it's frustrating for anyone trying to actually follow the plot.
Gavidor Gavidor
Reading "The Riddle-Master of Hed" is like trying to solve the riddle of someone else's partially-glimpsed dream. You enter a rich world of metaphor, sometimes baffling but always beautiful. A standard hero's quest is overgrown with fabulous beasts, children of stone, and death-dealing harps.

When Land-Ruler Morgon of Hed wins a bride and a crown in a riddling contest with a ghost, he wipes the cow manure off of his boots and sets sail from his tiny island kingdom. Unsure as to whether his beautiful, red-haired prize has any interest in marrying a farmer-king, Morgon sets course for the College of Riddle-Masters at Caithnard, where he was once a student and where his bride's brother still resides. His companion for the journey is Deth, the thousand-year-old High One's harpist.

Morgon and Deth are shipwrecked, and once Morgon regains his memory he discovers that he has unknown, shape-changing enemies who will stop at nothing to destroy him. As he flees through the kingdoms of his world, he is befriended by the various land-rulers and is gifted with a harp and a sword that are decorated with three stars--identical to the birthmark of stars on his forehead. He also learns how to change his own shape into beasts and trees.

Finally Morgon makes his way to Erlenstar Mountain with Deth, the harpist, hoping that the High One will solve the riddle of his stars and defend him against his implacable enemies.

Warning: don't read "The Riddle-Master of Hed" without the last two books of the trilogy at hand. The ending of the first book is a completely unexpected sucker-punch, and although "Heir of Sea and Fire" ends by reconciling Morgon with his bride Raederle, they are both still being pursued by a very nasty wizard and an equally nasty horde of shape-changers. You have to read to the very end of this absorbing trilogy before you find even a tentative glimmering of peace and happiness at the end of "Harpist in the Wind."