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eBook The Poppet and the Lune ePub

eBook The Poppet and the Lune ePub

by Madeline Claire Franklin

  • ISBN: 0615480551
  • Category: Fantasy
  • Subcategory: Science Fiction
  • Author: Madeline Claire Franklin
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Unknown Press (March 9, 2012)
  • Pages: 360
  • ePub book: 1877 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1604 kb
  • Other: rtf azw mobi lrf
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 638

Description

Together they must face the dangers of the forest, forming an unlikely bond as their paths wind together, both of them bound by moonlight. The Poppet and the Lune: An Original Fairytale by Madeline Claire Franklin.

Together they must face the dangers of the forest, forming an unlikely bond as their paths wind together, both of them bound by moonlight.

Fortunately I had bought the book with whispersync audio so could swap between It's a litt More people need to hear about, know about and read this book, 'The Poppet and the Lune' by Madeline Claire Franklin.

Fortunately I had bought the book with whispersync audio so could swap between. Maybe this voice would suit a younger audience, but I'm afraid it spoiled the story for me, and I much preferred the book version. It's a litt More people need to hear about, know about and read this book, 'The Poppet and the Lune' by Madeline Claire Franklin. Every bit as good as Neil Gaiman's best works (and I am a huge NG fan). The protagonist is a young Poppet who was created by a powerful witch.

About Madeline Claire Franklin: Madeline is a 30-something lady-human and a writer of strange fictions. Her most recent work, THE TOWER, is the second book in the ARCANA series, a contemporary fantasy series about two girls finding their places between heaven and hell. Madeline Claire Franklin’s books. The Poppet and the Lune (The Poppet and the Lune,

by Madeline Claire Franklin. A lyrical, original fairy tale for all ages, with a cast of characters you won't soon forget.

by Madeline Claire Franklin. In the Kingdom of the Wolves, the Wolf King hunts. Roland, Hunter of Men, is looking for a witch-born girl. As the story passed down from his own father goes, the witch is the only one who knows how to release him from the curse: like all weremen, the Wolf King is trapped in the form of a wolf except during the full moon.

Listen to this book for FREE when you try Audible

Listen to this book for FREE when you try Audible. In fact, all of the characters in The Poppet and the Lune resist being pigeonholed, either with intriguing backstories or with a pervasive aura of mystery that leaves one wondering about them long after the story is over. The Poppet and the Lune is nothing short of a rejuvenation of a dying genre. It is fresh, original and brilliantly plotted, with characters that the reader cares about easily and deeply. It steers clear of most of the common clichés, and offering up genuine surprises in their place.

Written by Madeline Claire Franklin, Audiobook narrated by Elizabeth Basalto. But now, his cure has become the very reason why he must leave her: to protect her from himself.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Madeline Claire Franklin books online. The Poppet and the Lune. Madeline Claire Franklin. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles.

Showing results by author "Madeline Claire Franklin". The Arcana, Book 1. By: Madeline Claire Franklin. An Original Fairytale. Sci-Fi & Fantasy. Narrated by: Maria Marquis. Length: 9 hrs and 42 mins. Narrated by: Elizabeth Basalto. Length: 8 hrs and 30 mins.

Author Madeline Claire Franklin. 10 7. Books by Madeline Claire Franklin: The Hierophant (Book 1 in the Arcana Series).

A lyrical, original fairy tale for all ages, with a cast of characters you won’t soon forget. In the Kingdom of the Wolves, the Wolf King hunts. Roland, Hunter of Men, is looking for a witch-born girl. As the story passed down from his own father goes, the witch is the only one who knows how to release him from the curse: like all weremen, the Wolf King is trapped in the form of a wolf except during the full moon. In the Weirding Wood, the witch queen’s son seeks a new companion. Born without any talent for witchcraft and magic, Prince Baylis is obsessed with all things that come from it, hoarding magical artifacts and creatures alike. He has heard rumor of a living poppet, a spell crafted from parts salvaged from the dead, sewn together with moonlight--and he will stop at nothing to possess her. In a seaside village, a young man is stalked by nightmares of the beast that killed his father. When the wolves finally come for Faolin, their bite transforms him into the very monster he loathes and fears the most, confirming a legacy Faolin wished to be a lie: he is the heir to the Wolf King's throne. Exiled to the Everwood Forest, Faolin encounters a girl made of patchwork. With snow-white hair and mismatched eyes, and moon-bright stitches all over her body, the patchwork girl has set out from her village in search of her true name. Together, she and Faolin brave the wilderness, witchcraft, and magic of the Everwood Forest, drawn along their journey by unseen hands. But the spell that created the patchwork girl is not quite finished. Memories of lives she never lived haunt the poppet’s secondhand flesh, whispering their stories. As the journey wears on, the memories become louder, more insistent, weakening the magic that holds her together. The patchwork girl knows her time is running out: she must find a way to silence the memories, before she literally falls to pieces. For fans of Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book and Peter S. Beagle’s The Last Unicorn, The Poppet and the Lune is an enchanting fantasy adventure of self-discovery, and a captivating original fairy tale for all ages. _________________________________ Fantasy Book Categories >Fantasy Adventure >Fantasy and Magic >Fairy Tales, Young Adult >Fairy Tales, Adult

Comments

Oreavi Oreavi
The Poppet and the Lune takes fantasy away from the more typical swords and sorcery and into something more magical and philosophical. Aside from the storyline, the author's lyrical and mellifluous writing style makes this book a pleasure to read.

This is a story of a girl who is created from the parts of many children, yet who doesn't know just who or what she is. When the children of a small village are killed by a tragic accident, the parents of the children convince the local witch to bring a new child to life. The witch salvages the undamaged parts of the dead children and makes a patchwork girl, a girl who is then shared by the families of the dead children. She is named Elizabeth by the families, a name which never seems to resonate with her.

When the families have other children, they lose interest in the patchwork girl, and eventually, she leaves the village in an attempt to find someplace in which she fits. Meeting Faolin, a somewhat cowardly wereman, she goes from adventure to adventure while trying to discover her place in the world.

The strength of this novel is in the wordsmithing. The author turns poetry into prose. The first chapter flows along as if in a song. The words are lovingly selected and placed just so to evoke the strongest reaction and feeling of the reader. The rest of the book flows as well from this outstanding beginning.

The patchwork girl, with her mismatched eyes, is one of the most endearing characters about whom I have read in quite some time. I felt for her. I understood her dreams and needs. I wanted to reach into the novel and speak to her, to reassure her. For someone who has a dearth of her own emotions, she emotes to others. And given this lack of emotions, given that she cannot understand something as basic as love, it is amazing that the author is able to create such an emotive and likable character.

The other main character, Faolin, while likable, is not quite as believable. While we are told he is afraid not for himself but for the patchwork girl, in fact, he is frightened for himself, given his actions. And his leap at the end of the novel is not as well developed.

While I loved the writing, and while I savored every paragraph in and of itself, taken as a whole, I do think the novel could be tightened up a bit. There were a few times where the same thing was repeated over and over when the point was extremely well made the first time is was made. The action sequences were better, though, direct and well-paced.

This book is a gem. It is a joy to read, and the patchwork girl is truly an enjoyable heroine. I recommend this to anyone wanting a unique and fresh story of self-discovery.
Tygrafym Tygrafym
(From my blog at [...] - Reviews of independent and small press publications.)

After tragedy strikes a small village, killing all of its children, the villagers strike a deal with their local witch to create a new child, a patchwork of those who died, to replace those they have lost. With great reluctance, the witch complies, and soon produces Elizabeth, the "Poppet" referred to in the title. The witch is killed before the process is completed, leaving Elizabeth with many unanswered questions and a fragile identity. Throughout her many adventures, her search for the truth of her existence remains her main motivation.

The "Lune" is Faolin, a reluctant werewolf who becomes Elizabeth's loyal companion, protector and friend. He has a compelling story of his own, neatly sidestepping the categories of mere sidekick or romantic interest (although he does, in part, fill both these roles). In fact, all of the characters in The Poppet and the Lune resist being pigeonholed, either with intriguing backstories or with a pervasive aura of mystery that leaves one wondering about them long after the story is over.

The Poppet and the Lune is nothing short of a rejuvenation of a dying genre. It is fresh, original and brilliantly plotted, with characters that the reader cares about easily and deeply. It steers clear of most of the common clichés, and offering up genuine surprises in their place. I honestly believed that I knew where the main character's story arch was leading, but the ending was both different and better than I expected.

It's hard for me to review this book without sounding completely giddy and uncritical, so I hope the reader will understand that this is a very unusual reaction for me. As an editor and reviewer, my first instinct is to pick apart whatever I'm reading, which often makes it harder to slip completely into the atmosphere of a book. In addition, I had more or less given up on the fantasy genre in the late `90s, when all original thought appeared to have been bred out of it.

A few small criticisms: the book would have benefitted from a more thorough proofreading, although the flaws that have been overlooked are not more than many conventional works contain. These may also have been corrected in more recent editions.

My second concern is not directly with this novel, but with the discrepancy in quality between Franklin's novel-length and shorter works. This novel obviously received a great deal of care and attention, and I would love to see that same attention applied to her short stories, which often appear to be more impulsive and unpolished. I would like to see that gap in quality closed so that Franklin's shorter works, as well as standing more firmly on their own, can serve as better ambassadors to her wonderful novels.
Fomand Fomand
I picked this up because I loved the premise. I am SO glad I did. This is one of the most lyrical, engaging books I've read in a long, long time.

The characters are lovely. Both of the main characters are flawed and believeable. They are wonderful together. I love books where you can watch the characters grow throughout the book, and both main characters (and many of the side characters) grow and develop and change a lot throughout the book.

The writing style is a breath of fresh air. It is lyrical and magical. The descriptions are vivid and you can picture the characters and scenery clearly. The story is engrossing with enough twists and turns in the plot to keep you fascinated.

There were a few minor formatting and spelling/grammer errors, but they were few and far between when compared to many self published/small publisher books out there.

All in all, if you are looking for a lovely fantasy novel, I highly recommend The Poppet and the Lune!