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eBook The ghost from the Grand Banks ePub

eBook The ghost from the Grand Banks ePub

by Arthur Charles Clarke

  • ISBN: 0575049065
  • Subcategory: Science Fiction
  • Author: Arthur Charles Clarke
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: V. Gollancz; 1st edition (1990)
  • Pages: 253
  • ePub book: 1423 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1881 kb
  • Other: mobi docx txt rtf
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 711

Description

Arthur C. Clarke Finally, I am indebted to Charlie Pellegrino for his latest book, Ghosts of the Titanic (William Morrow, 2000)

A hundred years after the sinking of the Titanic, two of the world’s most powerful corporations race to find a way to raise and preserve the doomed luxury liner. The quest to uncover the secrets of the wreck and reclaim her becomes an obsessio. nd for some, a fatal one. The Ghost from the Grand Banks. Finally, I am indebted to Charlie Pellegrino for his latest book, Ghosts of the Titanic (William Morrow, 2000). This exhaustive coverage of the last hours of the ship, and the stories of its survivors, is packed with heartrending and often astonishing incidents. As Jim Cameron remarks on the jacket, Pellegrino brings the Titanic back to life.

The Ghost from the Grand Banks is a 1990 science fiction novel by British writer Arthur C. Clarke

The Ghost from the Grand Banks is a 1990 science fiction novel by British writer Arthur C. Clarke. The story deals with two groups, both of whom are attempting to raise one of the halves of the wreck of Titanic from the floor of the Atlantic Ocean in time for the sinking's centennial in 2012.

Sir Arthur Charles Clarke was born in Minehead, England, in 1917 and now lives in Colombo, Sri Lanka. He is a graduate, and Fellow, of King’s College, London, and Chancellor of the International Space University and the University of Moratuwa, near the Arthur C. Clarke Centre for Modern Technologies. Sir Arthur has twice been Chairman of the British Interplanetary Society.

This novel incorporates two of Arthur . larke's passions - deep sea exploration and future technology . Arthur C. Clarke was born in Minehead in 1917. larke's passions - deep sea exploration and future technology - in a fast-moving tale of mysetry and adventure. As operations proceed, the perfectly preserved body of a beautiful girl is found. She was not on the ship's passenger lists. I'm about 15 pages from the end of this book and I'm giving up. It's written badly. It's constructed of short (2-4 page) chapters which all follow exactly the same progression. During the Second World War he served as an RAF radar instructor, rising to the rank of Flight-Lieutenant.

Start by marking The Ghost from the Grand Banks (Arthur C. Clarke Collection) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Arthur Charles Clarke was one of the most important and influential figures in 20th century science fiction. Author of over fifty books, his numerous awards include the 1961 Kalinga Prize, the AAAS-Westinghouse science writing prize, the Bradford Washburn Award, and the John W. Campbell Award for his novel Rendezvous With Rama.

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Fans of Clarke’s writing will find that this book includes a fair bit of what he does extremely well, namely, the descriptions of speculative technology.

Fans of Clarke’s writing will find that this book includes a fair bit of what he does extremely well, namely, the descriptions of speculative technology. Clarke excels in building new technologies on solid scientific principles, so that what he describes seems entirely reasonable, even when it is actually quite incredible. The characters feel a bit flat, and some of their motivations seem weak or contrived. Clarke seems to recognize this, since he draws in a whole sub-plot built upon M-sets that have nothing to do with the efforts to raise the Titanic, apparently in a futile effort to flesh out several of the characters. This is a relatively short novel, and an easy one to read.

The Ghost from the Grand Banks. Two years before the centennial anniversary of the Titanic's demise, two powerful corporations are competing to raise the two halves of the famous ship. But what they find deep beneath the ocean's surface is more than they bargained for: six perfectly preserved bodies, including one of a beautiful woman who was not listed among the ship's original passengers. Who was she-and what was her secret? The mission to find out becomes all-consuming-and, for some, deadly.

The actual title, ‘Ghost from the Grand Banks’ was mentioned very briefly in a chapter of an earlier Clarke book .

The actual title, ‘Ghost from the Grand Banks’ was mentioned very briefly in a chapter of an earlier Clarke book, Imperial Earth, which mentions a recovered Titanic placed on display in New York. It is therefore no surprise with such a personal passion that he returns with Ghost to the mysterious world of the Earth’s oceans. The first part of the book, which takes up about half of the novel (‘Prelude’) sets up this world of the future and introduces us to our main characters.

A fast-moving mystery adventure by one of the world's greatest ever SF writers It is 2010. In two years' time it will be the centennial of the sinking of the Titanic. Two of the world's most powerful corporations race to raise the vessel but there are other powers at work, and chaos theory comes into play as plans progress - and six preserved bodies are found. This novel incorporates two of Arthur C.Clarke's passions - deep sea exploration and future technology - in a fast-moving tale of mysetry and adventure. As operations proceed, the perfectly preserved body of a beautiful girl is found. She was not on the ship's passenger lists. The quest to uncover the secrets of the wreck and reclaim her becomes an obsession ...and for some, a fatal one.

Comments

Gorisar Gorisar
This is without a doubt one of the worst books I've ever read. The whole thing is disjointed, jumping from event to event and from character to character, all of which are poorly portrayed. Then throw in digressions re mathematical and technological theory, and you have a disaster of Titanic proportions (pun intended). Any kind of decent story deserves (actually, requires) continuity, and this one lacks that. Not sure what all the hoopla is about this author, but I won't be wasting any more of my time with him.
Cia Cia
I didn't love it. I guess I was expecting a book that was more about the Titanic. There were a lot of characters and a lot of info about them. There's a mystery about the bodies that are found "perfectly preserved" and little is said about it and (SPOILER) one of them is never identified. It's just mentioned in an aside and I wanted to know all about each body, who they were, and so on. I think the book just wasn't what I expected, which was more of a Titanic story.
Windforge Windforge
I hate math I love this book about math and wish to share it with my grandchildren. I read it twice.
Chilldweller Chilldweller
Rereading this book was enjoyable after so many years
Qumen Qumen
Interesting in that it opens up possibilities
Bundis Bundis
Reading science fiction portrayals of a future that is now technically in the past is always an interesting experience. Where the author manages to make accurate predictions, one sometimes has to wonder if the prediction wasn’t self-fulfilling, in that it created the idea that inspired the development itself. In this case, though, Clarke was only reaching two decades ahead, from 1990 to 2010, and therefore didn’t feel the need to make any extreme extrapolations. As a result, while he missed the mark in many ways, his descriptions aren’t shockingly far from reality.

Fans of Clarke’s writing will find that this book includes a fair bit of what he does extremely well, namely, the descriptions of speculative technology. Clarke excels in building new technologies on solid scientific principles, so that what he describes seems entirely reasonable, even when it is actually quite incredible. In this book, he presents two different solutions to the problem of raising the Titanic, an incredible feat, if ever there were one, and both seem completely reasonable.

Unfortunately, this book is far more character driven than many of Clarke’s other tales, and this is not an area where his talents are at their best. The characters feel a bit flat, and some of their motivations seem weak or contrived. Clarke seems to recognize this, since he draws in a whole sub-plot built upon M-sets that have nothing to do with the efforts to raise the Titanic, apparently in a futile effort to flesh out several of the characters.

This is a relatively short novel, and an easy one to read. For those who are fascinated by the Titanic or deep sea exploration, Clarke’s descriptions might make it worth reading. But if you are looking for a first rate science fiction novel, give this a pass in favor of some of Clarke’s better works.
Kann Kann
I recognize that the author is one of the greatest science and science fiction writers of the last 200 years. I have read a great deal of his material.

This was dreadful to the point of being embarrassing.

The characters were not developed; The politics was far too evident; The plot was chaotic; The ending was incomprehensible; and if I go on; there will be spoilers which I am trying to avoid.

Clarke, sadly, kept writing long after his muse deserted him. It is sad to see how far the genius is decayed.

Give this one a miss!
Though it was deemed by many readers and critics as one of the weakest works of the late Clarke, I found this work not so bad and evidently deserving being read. Despite noticable inconsistency in the plot and lack of the grand finishing, the novell has a number of strong features: the author is proficient as always in describing technological and engineering feats, showing brave imagination and sound scientific approach, and gripping, though somewhat not very dynamic plot. It's interesting to follow the story of struggle to lift Titanic wreck after hundred years on the seabed by two competing huge corporations and explore unexpected story sideways. Maybe novell characters could seem a bit flat, but the stories of their fates are definitely touching. As additional treasure is Clarke's fascination with fractal mathematics and his depiction of Mandelbrot set and the concluding speech on the topic. It really made me dig the web for M-Set explanations. As the conclusion, I would for sure recommend this book for Arthr C. Clarke fans and others interested in elaborate SF. However, if you are looking for the best and grandest of Clarke - go for other titles...