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eBook Learning to Fall ePub

eBook Learning to Fall ePub

by Philip Simmons

  • ISBN: 073884022X
  • Category: Death and Grief
  • Subcategory: Self-Help
  • Author: Philip Simmons
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Xlibris Corp; 1 edition (November 21, 2000)
  • Pages: 155
  • ePub book: 1858 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1229 kb
  • Other: doc lrf azw lrf
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 204

Description

Philip Simmons writes with clarity and a passion for honesty, laced with wit. An extraordinary book.

Philip Simmons writes with clarity and a passion for honesty, laced with wit. Elaine Pagels, Princeton University, author of The Gnostic Gospels. When we learn to fall, we learn that only by letting go our grip on all that we ordinarly find most precious-our achievements, our plans, our loved ones, our very selves-can we find, ultimately, the most profound freedom. Devoid of self-pity, Simmons draws from a rich mix of wisdom (the stoic Marcus Aurelius, the Christian tradition, the Sufi poet, Rumi, and many others) to help illuminate his journey of living and dying.

The Blessings of an Imperfect Life. In Learning to Fall, Philip Simmons has blessed us all. - Rachel Naomi Remen, . author of Kitchen Table Wisdom. Sometimes there is no difference between a book and a blessing. hilarious ! - Boston Globe. Learning to Fall may become a spiritual classic. Spring 2008: Playboy magazine is reprinting Phil's essay "Night Vision" in their new anthology Playboy's Book of College Fiction

Learning to Fall book. Philip Simmons was just thirty-five years old in 1993 when he learned that he had ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, and was told he had less than five years to live

Learning to Fall book. Philip Simmons was just thirty-five years old in 1993 when he learned that he had ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, and was told he had less than five years to live. As a young husband and father, and at the start of a promising literary career, he suddenly had to learn the art of dying. Nine years later, he has succeeded, against the odds, in learning the art of living.

Philip Simmons was just thirty-five years old in 1993 when he learned that he had ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease . From our first faltering steps, Simmons says, we may fall into disappointment or grief, fall into or out of love, fall from youth or health

Philip Simmons was just thirty-five years old in 1993 when he learned that he had ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, and was told he had less than five years to live. From our first faltering steps, Simmons says, we may fall into disappointment or grief, fall into or out of love, fall from youth or health. And though we have little choice as to the timing or means of our descent, we may, as he affirms, fall with grace, to grace.

Электронная книга "Learning to Fall: The Blessings of an Imperfect Life", Philip Simmons

Электронная книга "Learning to Fall: The Blessings of an Imperfect Life", Philip Simmons. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Learning to Fall: The Blessings of an Imperfect Life" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. Now I find myself in late August, with the nights cool and the crickets thick in the fields. Already the first blighted leaves glow scarlet on the red maples. from Learning to FallPhilip Simmons was just thirty-five years old in 1993 when he learned that he had ALS, or Lou Gehrigs disease, and was told he had less than five years to live.

Learning to Fall - Spiritual Handbook for Mortals. com User, December 27, 2000. This book is what every post-modern spiritual seeker is after - a humane, down-to-earth exploration of the essence of soul, as seen from inside a full, thoughtful, suffering and joyful life. There are lots of references to spiritual "authorities," from Buddha to Emerson, but these just serve to ground the stories and insights.

new hampshire books & magazines - by owner. prev ▲ next ▶. reply.

Now I find myself in late August, with the nights cool and the crickets thick in the fields. Already the first blighted. Set amid the rugged New Hampshire mountains he once climbed, and filled with the bustle of family life against the quiet progression of illness, Learning to Fall illuminates the journey we all must take - the work of learning to live richly in the face of loss.

Simmons, Philip . 1957-. Simmons was a thirty-five year old father and English professor when he was diagnosed with ALS and given five years to live. Publication, Distribution, et. New York Simmons was a thirty-five year old father and English professor when he was diagnosed with ALS and given five years to live. Personal Name: Simmons, Philip . Rubrics: Suffering Religious aspects Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Patients College teachers United States Biography. by von Matthias Herdegen.

Philip Simmons was just 35 years old when he learned he had Motor Neurone Disease, a fatal condition that usually kills its victims in two to five years, but which Philip has already well exceeded. With a strong marriage, two young children and the start of a promising literary and academic career, he suddenly had to say goodbye. But, by learning the art of dying he has succeeded, against the odds, in learning the art of living. In 12 chapters, this book tells the story of Philip's spiritual journey. Finding answers to life's deepest questions - and introducing a host of colourful characters along the way - Philip illustrates, above all, that we can learn to live lives of depth, compassion and courage no matter what life throws at us.

Comments

Winawel Winawel
I have been reading this book given to me by a meditation "sister" and High ting something on almost every page. The author was a literature professor at Lake Forest College in Chicago before being diagnosed with Lou Gherig's disease in his 40s. His spiritual ruminations call on insights from Christianity to Hinduism/Buddhism/Tao to T.S. Eliot and Wallace Stevens to nature and the seasons in New Hampshire. A gentle, often humorous, and surprisingly hopeful reflection on what life looks like when we have nothing else to lose.
Kakashkaliandiia Kakashkaliandiia
If there's ever a time to heed what someone is saying, it's when that person is dying. Imminent death tends to clear the deck for both the writer and the reader and allows us to be receptive to those ultimate concerns that get obscured and deflected in the bustle of daily life when we assume we have all the time in the world.

Phillip Simmons, a college English professor, was in his mid 30's when he was diagnosed with Lou Gherig's disease. As his disease progressed, he left his teaching job and retreated to a rural New Hampshire vacation home with his wife and two children. Fortunately for us, he completed this book in 2002, the same year he sucummbed to his illness.

Simmons uses falling as an extended metaphor for what happens throughout life--not only at the end. As he writes in the forward: " ... we deal most fruitfully with loss by accepting the fact that we will someday lose everything. When we learn to fall, we learn that only by letting go our grip on all that we ordinarly find most precious--our achievements, our plans, our loved ones, our very selves--can we find, ultimately, the most profound freedom."

Devoid of self-pity, Simmons draws from a rich mix of wisdom (the stoic Marcus Aurelius, the Christian tradition, the Sufi poet, Rumi, and many others) to help illuminate his journey of living and dying. Despite his lamentation that most of us find life to be "not what we had in mind," Simmons finds depth and meaning in his descent. Amazingly, what makes his account so remarkable is that he seems willing to take it--even embrace it--rather than kicking up dust with a posture of heroic resistance.

Whether we consciously consider our utlimate fate or consign it to a sealed and hidden container to be examined "later," we all know that we are on a river that flows downward to the sea. What is reassuring about Simmon's account is that we can bow to and find meaning in this great, mystical journey.
Mr.Death Mr.Death
I was in a book store last evening and this book lay on a display table surrounded by fifty other books. What attracted me to to it? The simple yet beautiful cover art? The title? I'm not sure- but for some reason I picked it up and opened it to a random page, and read, "But maybe we're asking the wrong thing of God. Rhyme and reason, after all, are human values, not divine ones. Wanting human suffering to fit some divine plan is like wanting to fly an airplane over tornado wreckage and see that it spells out song lyrics or a cure for acne." (p.29)

In the words of Jerry McGuire, the author had me at hello. I read no further and bought the book.

I had a million other things on my to-do list today, and taking half the day to read a book wasn't on the list. But I read. And I couldn't put it down. And it's ironic, since the end of the book focuses on our need to practice the art of doing nothing--and in doing what we do with an aware mind. I suspect that if the author were still alive, he would be pleased to know that I stopped my endless tasks and simply read.

It is truly a book borne of human spirit and all that is good- love, compassion, understanding, faith. It is about looking at the "bad" and seeing it for what it is-- just part of life. It is funny-- I couldn't stop laughing at some of his jokes and observations. I won't spoil them for you but I hope you enjoy his joke about the turtle and the snail as much as I did. This book will make you laugh and make you cry-- that's a trite comment I know, but it's true. And, to continue my trite comments, I couldn't put it down. I hope you won't be able to either-- because that means it touched you like it did me. I know I will re-read it soon and I hope I remember to re-read it often. As the author would say (but not out loud for fear you might question his sanity) "Namaste."
Hystana Hystana
This is one of my favorite books of all time. It provides a very open-minded view of human life, with all of its ups and downs. The author was diagnosed with ALS age 35 and died at age 39. In between, he wrote this book. I thought I would be learning much about the disease and how it progresses, but it really was not about living with ALS. Instead, it was about living, regardless of your circumstances. It's philosophical and spiritual, but the author is not wed to any particular philosophy or religion. It's about enjoying what it enjoyable and living with what it not enjoyable, quite simply. I have given away eight copies of this book because I don't think there is a better lesson to be learned.
Dodo Dodo
Get this book!!! This is for everyone. Sad but uplifting. Philip Simmons faced ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease) with bravery even though he knew it was a journey towards death. He used his remaining time wisely reflecting on his life and family with love. He expressed spiritually in a way that is thought provoking and makes one appreciate the little joys in life. I've read this three times and should pick it up again.