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eBook Raising Resilient Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Strategies for Maximizing Their Strengths, Coping with Adversity, and Developing a Social Mindset ePub

eBook Raising Resilient Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Strategies for Maximizing Their Strengths, Coping with Adversity, and Developing a Social Mindset ePub

by Robert Brooks Ph.D.,Sam Goldstein Ph.D.

  • ISBN: 0071385223
  • Category: Relationships
  • Subcategory: Self-Help
  • Author: Robert Brooks Ph.D.,Sam Goldstein Ph.D.
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education; 1 edition (January 9, 2012)
  • Pages: 288
  • ePub book: 1271 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1744 kb
  • Other: doc lrf txt mbr
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 269

Description

In their latest book, Robert Brooks, P. and Sam Goldstein, P. explore strategies gleamed from their clinical practice working with children diagnosed with ASD and their families

In their latest book, Robert Brooks, P. explore strategies gleamed from their clinical practice working with children diagnosed with ASD and their families. As they write: "Parents strongly influence, however, whether children with ASD will develop the characteristics and mindset associated with resilience or whether they will.

Robert Brooks Sam GoldsteinEnero 6, 2012. McGraw Hill Professional. Learn how to: Empower your child to problem-solve on his or her own. Teach your child to learn from mistakes rather than feel defeated by them. Discipline your child while instilling self-worth. Build an alliance with your child's school. Magbasa pa. I-collapse.

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Different croaks for different folks: all about children with special learning needs, Midori Ochiai, 2006 Do unto otters: a book about manners, Lauri Keller, 2009 Fasten your seatbelt: a crash course in Down syndrome for brothers and sisters, Brian G. Skotko, 2009 Marshall the miracle dog: a picture book based on a true story, Cynthia Willenbrock, 2012 My brother is very special, Amy.

Find nearly any book by Dr. Robert Brooks. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Founded in 1997, BookFinder. com has become a leading book price comparison site

New hope for parents raising a child with autism spectrum disorders

In Raising Resilient Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders, noted psychologists and bestselling authors Dr. Goldstein and Dr. Brooks teach you the strategies and mindset necessary to help your child develop strength, hope, and optimism. This is the first approach for autism spectrum disorders based in the extremely popular field of positive psychology.

Drs. Brooks and Goldstein--world-renowned experts on child psychology and, specifically, resilience--offer you practical tips for long-term solutions rather than just quick fixes. Featuring dozens of stories and an easy-to-follow, prescriptive narrative, Drs. Brooks and Goldstein demonstrate how to apply resilience to every parenting practice when raising a child with autism spectrum disorders, preparing him or her for the challenges of today’s complicated, ever-changing world and helping your child develop essential social skills.

Learn how to: Empower your child to problem-solve on his or her own Teach your child to learn from mistakes rather than feel defeated by them Discipline your child while instilling self-worth Build an alliance with your child's school

Related to Raising Resilient Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Strategies for Maximizing Their Strengths, Coping with Adversity, and Developing a Social Mindset

Comments

Whitescar Whitescar
Recently as a psychologist, I was meeting with a couple who had been referred by their daughter's preschool teacher because their 4 year old had symptoms that were possibly autism spectrum issues. They had been reading a lot about autism online and were almost convinced. They were not worried about the label, but they were very concerned about what to do to help their child.

They described an extremely bright, socially awkward girl. She was invited to parties but played by herself. She memorized the license plates of the cars of everyone her family knows. She was already reading and had trouble sleeping because she was worried a tornado might come while she was asleep.
Looking around my bookshelves which contain over 100 books about autism, the mom asked me, "So if she is on the spectrum, what should we read first?" She had spotted a book by Tony Atwood. I thought for a moment.

"Actually that's a good one. But the one I would recommend is not there, because I have the Kindle edition. It's 'Raising Emotionally Resilient Children with ASD.'"

Robert Naseef, Ph.D,Psychologist, author, parent of an adult child with autism.Autism in the Family: Caring and Coping Together
ARE ARE
I got this book to review for my blog, and was pleasantly surprised by it! I am the parent of a 6 year old with autism, and while I do some of the things the writers suggest, there was a lot I could still learn from. By providing concrete and detailed examples of discussions and solutions they discovered with their patience, the tools here come to life and make for reasonably attainable goals. I will be re-reading it more slowly, and see where we still need to make changes and which of these great ideas we can employ as a family. And while I only have one child with autism, some of these tips were helpful in thinking about teaching my daughter with a different disability. Great book, I highly recommend for families with a child with autism.
Chillhunter Chillhunter
I am a child psychologist and I recommend this book to parents who are looking for a practical reference to equip them to assist their special needs child
Zugar Zugar
This is a must-have book for family and friends of a loved one with ASD.
Fearlessrunner Fearlessrunner
I enjoyed reading this book. It had lots of good information on raising children of all kinds
Hugighma Hugighma
When we think of our children on the autism spectrum, a social resilient mindset is not the first thing that springs to mind. In their latest book, Robert Brooks, Ph.D., and Sam Goldstein, Ph.D., explore strategies gleamed from their clinical practice working with children diagnosed with ASD and their families. Indeed, the focus for helping children develop this social mindset is on encouraging parents and other charismatic adults to establish empathetic communication and acceptance, rather than concentrating on the child's difficulties.

As they write:
"Parents strongly influence, however, whether children with ASD will develop the characteristics and mindset associated with resilience or whether they will be burdened by low self-worth, self-doubt, and a diminished sense of hope." (p.29)
The authors recognize the challenge of being an empathetic parent to a child"whose perceptions and behaviors are often strikingly different from our own." (p.32). Thus the authors provide real-life examples of how they've guided other families through the process, and helped them overcome the challenges they faced along the way. Once parents have faced the challenge of relating to their children in a way that doesn't cause the child to shut down, they are then given strategies to encourage children to solve the problems they are facing.

One of the strategies the authors promote I found particularly appealing- the notion of using `bubble-talk' to encourage a child to learn the difference between thoughts which may be vocalized, and those which are distressing or off-putting to others.

This technique was used with great success with a number of individuals to help develop more appropriate social interactions. Though we haven't personally encountered this problem yet, I know it is only a matter of time, and I will definitely be using this technique with both Pudding and Cubby.

A central tenet Raising Resilient Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders is the role of parents in nurturing"Islands of Competence" in their children. Many of us have noticed the way our children light up when they can demonstrate their talents. It just feels right to build on these skills, rather than constantly trying to remediate challenges. The authors describe promoting the special interests, or unique skills and experience that the individual has and using those as a basis for developing esteem and self-worth. For many children featured in the book, this was about taking an area of perseveration and allowing this knowledge to be showcased as a talent to be enjoyed by others, and a way of relating to peers. Of particular poignance was the way the therapists encouraged a ten-year-old boy with Asperger's to write a book describing how he dealt with his mother's death, which was subsequently displayed in the school library.

As many of us are aware, our children are all different, and what works for one may have opposite effect on another. Brooks and Goldstein advocate that we "consider potential roadblocks in advance...knowing that if one approach does no work, there are others that might, provides families with a very precious commodity: hope." (pp.171-2). Indeed, just because a strategy is not successful in our first attempt, it does not mean that it won't work later. Rather than seeing the problem of our child's behavior, or indeed- in our parenting- we should look at the ways we can address particular skills.

This book will be of particular use to parents whose relationship with their child could use some expert guidance to get it back on track, especially those who frequently find their well-intentioned efforts to help their children fix their problems and social deficits are rebuffed or have disastrous consequences. A guide to supporting and promoting a child's strengths and talents to allow them to champion adversity and develop the social resilience so essential for a positive outcome in adulthood.

"Children with ASD are capable of finding happiness, success, attachment, and comfort in adult life...this book will be of help to parents and other caregivers of children on the autism spectrum to attain this happiness and resilience." (pp. 248-9)
Arakus Arakus
The book gives a nice review of what we should be doing as parents to help our children with ASD. I was able to highlight many things that I can look back at for quick reminders of what to say and how to phrase discussions when talking to our son. The book provides many useful tips and ideas to consider when helping our children deal with certain social situations.