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eBook The Jews of Islam (Princeton Paperbacks) ePub

eBook The Jews of Islam (Princeton Paperbacks) ePub

by Bernard Lewis

  • ISBN: 0691008078
  • Category: Judaism
  • Subcategory: Spirituality
  • Author: Bernard Lewis
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press; Reprint edition (June 1, 1987)
  • Pages: 280
  • ePub book: 1884 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1898 kb
  • Other: azw rtf lrf txt
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 145

Description

Bernard Lewis is Cleveland E. Dodge Professor of Near Eastern Studies Emeritus at Princeton University, a. .I've read a fair number of Bernard Lewis's books

Bernard Lewis is Cleveland E. Dodge Professor of Near Eastern Studies Emeritus at Princeton University, a long-term member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and the author of numerous works on the Middle East. Series: Princeton Paperbacks. I've read a fair number of Bernard Lewis's books. He continues to do astounding work (far better than other scholars in this field who are 1/2 his age); and "The Jews of Islam" is a wonderful example.

Lewis, Bernard (1984). Princeton: Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-16087-0.

Bernard Lewis It is a measure of Mr. Lewis's gift for synthesis that all the many findings of recent sholarship, including his own in the Turkish archives, are made.

Introduction by. Mark R. Cohen. This landmark book probes Muslims’ attitudes toward Jews and Judaism as a special case of their view of other religious minorities in predominantly Muslim societies. It is a measure of Mr. Lewis's gift for synthesis that all the many findings of recent sholarship, including his own in the Turkish archives, are made to fit into a coherent and plausible pattern. simplistic approaches and tries to explain the complex and often contradictory history of Jewish-Muslim relations over fourteen hundred years.

The Jews of Islam - Bernard Lewis. First Princeton Paperback printing, 1987. The Jews of Islam, first published in 1984,¹ is one of two books that Bernard Lewis devoted entirely to Jewish history. First Princeton Classics Paperback printing, with a new foreword, 2014. ISBN: 978-0-691-16087-0. The other, Semites and Anti-Semites, appeared two years later. Indeed, I once asked him why he wrote so often about the Jews.

Bernard Lewis is the Cleveland E. Dodge Professor Emeritus of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University, a long-term member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and the author of numerous works on the Middle East. Cohen is the Khedouri A. Zilkha Professor Emeritus of Jewish Civilization in the Near East at Princeton. Country of Publication.

This landmark book probes Muslims' attitudes toward Jews and Judaism as a special case of their view of other religious minorities in predominantly Muslim societies. For those wishing a concise overview of the long period of Jewish-Muslim relations, The Jews of Islam remains an essential starting point. Format Paperback 272 pages.

Bernard Lewis, Mark R. This landmark book probes Muslims' attitudes toward Jews and Judaism as a special case of their view of other religious minorities in predominantly Muslim societies. With authority, sympathy and wit, Bernard Lewis demolishes two competing stereotypes: the Islamophobic picture of the fanatical Muslim warrior, sword in one hand and Qur'?n in the other, and the overly romanticized depiction of Muslim societies as interfaith utopias

Examines the Judaeo-Islamic tradition, traces the history of Islam, and describes the reasons for the breakdown in relations between the Jews and the Islamic world.

Examines the Judaeo-Islamic tradition, traces the history of Islam, and describes the reasons for the breakdown in relations between the Jews and the Islamic world.

Bernard Lewis is Cleveland E. Informations bibliographiques. The Jews of Islam Princeton paperbacks.

Probing the Muslims' attitude toward Judaism as a special case of their view of other religious minorities in Islamic countries, Bernard Lewis demolishes two competing stereotypes: the fanatical warrior, sword in one hand and Qur' an in the other, and the Muslim designer of an interfaith utopia. Available for the first time in paperback, his portrayal of the Judaeo-Islamic tradition is set against a vivid background of Jewish and Islamic history.

Comments

Zorve Zorve
I've read a fair number of Bernard Lewis's books. He continues to do astounding work (far better than other scholars in this field who are 1/2 his age); and "The Jews of Islam" is a wonderful example. I would have given it 5 stars, but I've read some of this content before.

Bias is an unfortunately all-too-human trait. Yet Dr. Lewis has an amazing capicity to be fair. His critics (and he has many, mostly undeserved) could take a page from his approach. He is scrupulous in examining how jews faired in Moslem-dominated societies over the last 1,400 years and compares that to their treatment under European-dominated Christendom (what a wonderful word that only Lewis would use today). if you want to understand how one of the root causese of todays middle eastern conflict, you can't do better than Dr. Lewis.
Stan Stan
This book is about the Jews lived in Muslim countries. It is not about any certain Jew or famous personalities. Whole story is in general terms. I found the history during the early periods of the Islam very short and on the surface. Key relationships were not elaborated.Most of the information, may be because of availability of the sources was regarding the Jewish community in Ottoman Lands around 15 to 17th centruries. Information about the Jews in other countries is almost non existent but impression was given to make an opinion that it was not as good. There is a section in the book that talks about paralells between Judaism, their way of life and Islam to imply that Islam simply is an extention of Judaism but I find no correlation between their life in muslim countries which the book is supposed to be about and their religion for Muslims did not differentiate Christians or jews, they were both considred monotheist.Over all it is an easy reading but not satisfying for me for it lacked systematic and concrete points.
Landamath Landamath
The book is clear , a synthesis of a few hundred years of Hystory , makes u understand better the actual situation between Jews and Islam
Axebourne Axebourne
A very enlightening account of not only the Jewish experience in Islamic lands, but also of the overall treatment of non-Muslim subjects within Muslim territories. This historical background is essential to the understanding of present relations between Islam and the West, as well as Israel and its surrounding Muslim neighbours. Lewis writes in a style easy to read, and yet still academically rigorous. I would highly recommend this book to anyone wishing to get beyond current media headlines and dwelve deeper into the roots of contemporary unease between the West and Islam. As for Jews like myself who grew up in Muslim countries, it is essential reading.
Jox Jox
The keen eye and mind of Bernard Lewis ! He is really and truly the Middle East's and the Arab world's expert.
Micelhorav Micelhorav
I was always vaguely aware that Jews sometimes got better treatment from Muslims than from Christians. But this book explains the roots in Muslim theology of Muslim/Jewish relations (under which non-Muslim monotheists were tolerated as second-class citizens), and shows how large some Jewish communities were.

I was surprised to learn that in the 15th century, Turkey was so attractive for Jews that Jewish writers wrote about Turkey as glowingly as later writers wrote about America. For example, Isaac Zarfati, a refugee from Germany, wrote: "I proclaim to you that Turkey is a land wherein nothing is lacking, and where, if you will, all shall yet be well with you . . . Here every man may dwell at peace under his own vine and fig tree. Here you are allowed to wear the most precious garments. In Christendom, on the contrary, you dare not even venture to clothe your children in red or in blue, according to our taste, without exposing them to the insult of beaten black and blue, or kicked green and red . . . O Israel, wherefore sleepest though? Arise! And leave this accursed land forever!" (p. 136)

Similarly, in the 16th century Portuguese refugee Samuel Usque described Turkey as "a broad and spacious sea which God opened with the rod of His mercy as He opened the Red Sea at the time of the exodus . .. here the gates of liberty are always open for the observance of Judaism" (Id.)

But the situation deteriorated in the last several centuries: it is not altogether clear why, and maybe Lewis isn't completely sure himself. Lewis speculates that Jews lost contact with Europe, and thus (unlike Christians in Islamic lands) no longer had trade connections or language skills to offer to the national economy, and were thus more easily persecuted because of their poverty and uselessness. But why did the Jews lose touch with the rest of the world? What went wrong? It is not quite clear.

A side note: the unfavorable reviews of this book attack Lewis for being too pro-Muslim, while the unfavorable reviews of "Semites and Anti-Semites" attack him for being insufficiently pro-Muslim and anti-Israel. If Lewis is getting shot at from both sides, he must be doing something right.