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eBook I Ching: The Classic Chinese Oracle of Change : The First Complete Translation With Concordance ePub

eBook I Ching: The Classic Chinese Oracle of Change : The First Complete Translation With Concordance ePub

by Rudolf Ritsema,Stephen Karcher

  • ISBN: 1852305363
  • Category: New Age and Spirituality
  • Subcategory: Spirituality
  • Author: Rudolf Ritsema,Stephen Karcher
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Element Books Ltd; First Edition edition (November 1, 1994)
  • Pages: 816
  • ePub book: 1548 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1494 kb
  • Other: txt rtf azw docx
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 411

Description

This first complete translation of a 3, 000-year-old Chinese divination system includes imagery and material previously . TRULY IN-LOVE with Stephen Karcher's I Ching Translation With Concordance. I HIGHLY recommend it to all spiritual seekers of Wisdom.

The spirit of this unique translation is both very old and radically new-a modern psychological approach that truly bridges East and West TRULY IN-LOVE with Stephen Karcher's I Ching Translation With Concordance. 2 people found this helpful.

This first complete translation of a 3, 000-year-old Chinese divination system includes imagery and material previously .

Stephen L. Karcher (translator), Rudolf Ritsema (translator). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

Associated Contexts Thunder This book is not for the occasional I Ching reader, but for people who like to read between the lines

Your life will never be the same again! The I Ching can entirely change the. Associated Contexts Thunder This book is not for the occasional I Ching reader, but for people who like to read between the lines. It is intriguing and open an entirely new way of reading the oracle of changes. This is an example from hexagram 16: Thunder issuing-forth-from earth impetuously.

I ching: The Classic Chinese Oracle of Change: The First Complete Translation with Concordance, translated by Rudolf Ritsema and Stephen Karcher (Shaftesbury, Dorset, Element, 1994)

I ching: The Classic Chinese Oracle of Change: The First Complete Translation with Concordance, translated by Rudolf Ritsema and Stephen Karcher (Shaftesbury, Dorset, Element, 1994). translated by Rudolf Ritsema and Hansjakob Schneider (Frankfurt am Main, Zweitausendeins, 2000).

Best I-Ching translation. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 21 years ago. Is the best translation i have worked with.

I Ching : The Classic Chinese Oracle of Change, the First Complete Translation with Concordance. The I Ching is a powerful oracle or divinatory system with roots that go back over 3000 years. Its divinatory core, the oldest and most complex system to survive into modern times, consists of a set of 64 six-line figures, referred to as hexagrams. Best I-Ching translation. As is very difficult would be better to accompany it with a more traditional translation.

The I Ching is an oracle. Its answers change the way you see things The transforming power is achieved by focusing on the book as an oracle, a method developed over many years by the translation team to preserve the original wealth of th. . Its answers change the way you see things. Your anxieties, fears and desires emerge to be recognized and resolved, and hidden transformative energies are released. The transforming power is achieved by focusing on the book as an oracle, a method developed over many years by the translation team to preserve the original wealth of the imagery.

The Taoist I Ching: Thomas Cleary The Complete I Ching: The Definitive Translation by Alfred Huang I Ching: The Classic Chinese Oracle of Change by Rudolf Ritsema & Stephen Karcher.

The spirit of this unique translation is both very old and radically new-a modern psychological approach that truly bridges East and West. About Rudolf Ritsema. Published November 1, 1994 by Element Books Ltd. 816 pages Genres: Religion & Spirituality, Law & Philosophy. Karcher,Rudolf Ritsema. The subtitle to this book is misleading

Stephen L. Mind, Body & Spirit. The subtitle to this book is misleading. It describes itself as "the first complete translation" and yet on page 16 it lists the parts they decided not to translate and include in their version of the book. It seems to concern itself more with a modern Jungian understanding of the oracles rather than the intention of the ancient authors. So much so, that each oracle is followed by a thesaurus of meanings for each word or phrase in the oracle

This first complete translation of a 3,000-year-old Chinese divination system includes imagery and material previously unavailable to Westerners. The spirit of this unique translation is both very old and radically new--a modern psychological approach that truly bridges East and West.

Comments

Survivors Survivors
This version of the Yi-Ching evidently suits some people. But I have a number of reservations about it. It's strong point is that it consciously taps into a 'Jungian' agenda. Jung's ideas are certainly complementary to aspects of the Yi-Ching. But this 'Jungian' perspective is exaggerated, affecting the way the material is approached. My chief reservation here, is the way the translation was kept semantically vague, in the hope that it would somehow reflect something of the open-ended quality of the Chinese text. In this respect, the authors try - perhaps too hard, to do their readers work for them, unpacking bits of line symbolism piecemeal, without making their intrin- sic connection clear. I suppose this was meant to widen the psychological parameters - presenting a kind of larger 'Rorcharch' ink-blot to look out, as it were. It was an interesting experiment - which has its applicability, but at times, the readings seem needlessly obscure. For example, in

# 7 Shih: The Army - why be so literal, putting 'Left' - when it is clear that 'Left' means to be in 'retreat' - and 'right,' to advance. Again, it seems arbitrary to translate 'chang-tzu' as 'Longer-lived brother' - when it clearly means 'elder-brother' - in contrast to the Ti-tzu, or younger brother. Why this excessive thirst for unpacking detail? - when the primary symbols - from the Chinese point of view, are the 'kua' (i.e. trigram relationships). Although the authors noted the 'inner' and 'outer' trigrams etc., their relevance is almost displaced, by the focus on breaking down line texts. When it comes to a 'Jungian' type approach to the Yi-Ching, I don't think anyone has bettered Carol Anthony's books -summing up the archetypal situations reflected in the kua/hexagrams, without all this semantic obfuscation.

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Teonyo Teonyo
the best I Ching on the market by far. It is a scholarly text, and has some history and context.... and includes a take on Jungian psychology which I found very interesting. I have used this book for many years, usually at some time of change... of course, when I was at a crossroads and am to this day amazed at the readings I get. It is like a wise friend to me, a friend I consult in order to get the big picture of my life in the moment. Life is a mystery, for anybody who looks at it deeply. And this book shines a light at the order within the mystery. I highly recommend this version, it is by far the most worthy of serious contemplation and use.
Gholbithris Gholbithris
A great translation...very authentic
Cyregaehus Cyregaehus
a thick book to read
Akisame Akisame
I AM...TRULY IN-LOVE with Stephen Karcher's I Ching Translation With Concordance...I HIGHLY recommend it to all spiritual seekers of Wisdom.
Arlana Arlana
It seems a dictionary of synonymous. Not of what expected at all. Whilhelm, Blofeld, Legge, and others each have different approaches and suggestions, and are still useful guides. Whilhelm is my first choice.
Uttegirazu Uttegirazu
3 1/2 Stars for this translation.
This translation of the I-Ching (Yi Jing), a 3000+ year old Chinese divination system, offers more than the ever-so-common literal translation of the famous Chinese text that many of the modern translations boil down to, which is good, and bad.
Karcher has relied upon his knowledge of Jung's psychoanalytical methods, and understanding of how the human mind functions, to reveal the I-Ching as a solid and effective psychological tool to unlocking one's own insights. This translation was written to help the individual to connect with his or her inner-self, unlock the creative and reasoning abilities of the mind, and find answers locked deep within. I'll get to my issue with this in a minute.
The material covered in the Chapters includes:
PART I
Introduction to the I-Ching
- What is the I-Ching
- The Name of the Book
- What is Divination
- Origin, History and Development of the Classic of I,
Using the I-Ching
- This Translation
- Questioning the Oracle
- Getting Answers
- Reading the Response
- Keywords: Traps for Tao
- Encounters with the Oracle
The Global System
- Divination and Traditional Science
- The Time Cycle
- Yin & Yang: Struction and Action
- Yin & Yang: Choice and Change
- The Five Transformative Moments
- The Trigram Cycle
PART II:
A Quick Guide to the Oracle
- Hexagram Texts and their Functions
- Orthography and Punctuation
A List of the Hexagrams
- The Section of the Hexagrams
The Hexagrams 1 to 64
PART III
Concordance
Further Reading
A Key to the Hexagrams
Karcher's approach to the I-Ching has its advantages in that it explains the I-Ching with an understanding of how the mind, itself, works, which may be very helpful for the analytical-minded.
My issue with this translation is that it is handled from a Western psychological approach, which, in my honest opinion, takes away from the Chinese *philosophy* behind it, and reduces the open-ended, free-flowing nature of the work that allows for multiple-interpretations. So, this is a reasonably good translation, but not a great one.
If you are looking for a *logical* approach to understanding the I-Ching, this text certainly wouldn't hurt! It may do well for you. BUT, I would recommend using this text along with another that provides a solid understanding of the Chinese philosophy and thought behind the I-Ching (something sadly lacking in many Western Translations).
"The Complete I Ching: The Definitive Translation" by the Taoist Master Alfred Huang is probably the best English translation of the I-Ching available, as it was written by someone who not only truly understands the culture and philosophy of the Chinese Taoists (he's a Taoist from China himself), but has gone to the effort to kept the open-ended feeling and multiple-interpretation nature of the work in tact.
Best of luck to you.
Karcher's interpretation is an interesting modern alternative to Wilhelm/Baynes neo-confused and Christian version. Unfortunately, Karcher adds more refuse and he has failed to access some contemporary translations. Compared to Lynn or Shaughnessy, Karcher rarely bothers to explain when he is using an unknown Chinese source and when he is making things up as he goes along. This slippery and highly creative way of translating gets even worse in his personal interpretation of Te Chuan. He is very good-willed, yet Karcher still has not learned the difference between the yin and yang-sides of his cash (Chinese coins)...