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eBook The New Age in Glastonbury: The Construction of Religious Movements ePub

eBook The New Age in Glastonbury: The Construction of Religious Movements ePub

by David Riches†,Ruth Prince

  • ISBN: 1571819932
  • Category: Religious Studies
  • Subcategory: Spirituality
  • Author: David Riches†,Ruth Prince
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Berghahn Books; 1 edition (January 1, 2001)
  • Pages: 312
  • ePub book: 1826 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1336 kb
  • Other: docx mobi txt rtf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 409

Description

The New Age movement is a twentieth-century socio-cultural phenomenon in the Western world with Glastonbury as one of its major centers.

The New Age movement is a twentieth-century socio-cultural phenomenon in the Western world with Glastonbury as one of its major centers. Through experimenting with a number of ways of analyzing this movement, the authors were able to develop a novel theory of social religious movements of broad applicability. Based around contradictions relating to such central The New Age movement is a twentieth-century socio-cultural phenomenon in the Western world with Glastonbury as one of its major centers.

Ruth Prince, David Riches. The New Age movement is a twentieth-century socio-cultural phenomenon in the Western world with Glastonbury as one of its major centers.

The New Age in Glastonbury : The Construction of Religious Movements. The New Age movement is a twentieth-century socio-cultural phenomenon in the Western world with Glastonbury as one of its major centers

The New Age in Glastonbury : The Construction of Religious Movements. by David Riches and Ruth Prince. Based around contradictions relating to such central anthropological concepts as communitas, egalitarianism, individualism, holism, and autonomy

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Personal Name: Riches, David. Rubrics: New Age movement. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Through experimenting with a number of ways of analyzing this movement, the authors were able to develop a novel theory of social religious movements of broad applicability. David Riches is Senior Lecturer in Social Anthropology at the University of St Andrews.

The New Age in Glastonbury: The Construction of Religious . The term New Religious Movement is often used to explain the boom of new religious groups since the 1960s counter-cultural revolution.

The New Age in Glastonbury: The Construction of Religious Movements. Berghahn Books, 2000. p. 153. ^ Navarra, Tova. The Encyclopedia of Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 32. ^ a b c d e Wilde, Stuart. Grace, Gaia and the End of Days.

Concluding with reflections on the successes and limitations of the Rainbow movement, People of the Rainbow .

Concluding with reflections on the successes and limitations of the Rainbow movement, People of the Rainbow provides an extensive ethnography of this intriguing subculture and provides fresh insights into the ongoing legacy of utopian communalism. The Author: Michael I. Niman is an adjunct assistant professor of American studi. The New Age in Glastonbury: The Construction of Religious Movements

The book concludes with an exploration of the ecological activities, theologies and rites of passage of pagans.

The New Age movement is a twentieth-century socio-cultural phenomenon in the Western world with Glastonbury as one of its major centers. Through experimenting with a number of ways of analyzing this movement, the authors were able to develop a novel theory of social religious movements of broad applicability. Based around contradictions relating to such central anthropological concepts as communitas, egalitarianism, individualism, holism, and autonomy, it reveals the processes by which, having abandoned a mainstream lifestyle, people come to build up a counter-culture way of life. Drawing on their own work on tribal shamanistic religions, the authors are able to point out interesting similarities between the latter and the Glastonbury New Age movement. Not only that: their model allows them to explain such wide-ranging social and religious movements as the Hutterites, the Kibbutz, and Green communes. In fact, the authors argue, these movements may be regarded as variations of the Glastonbury type.