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eBook Leisure: The Basis of Culture ePub

eBook Leisure: The Basis of Culture ePub

by James V. Schall,Josef Pieper

  • ISBN: 1586172565
  • Category: Religious Studies
  • Subcategory: Spirituality
  • Author: James V. Schall,Josef Pieper
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Ignatius Press (October 1, 2009)
  • Pages: 145
  • ePub book: 1148 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1114 kb
  • Other: lrf mobi mbr lrf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 727

Description

This book is really two in one. The first "Leisure, The Basis of Culture" and "The Philosophical Ac.  . I never thought of liturgy as leisure before I read this book. Pieper makes a wonderful point that liturgy does not serve any pratical purpose. Rather liturgy carries us into another dimenension.

This book is really two in one. The first book starts with the premise that "the foundation of Western culture is leisure. Something not easily appreciated in our hectic life. Yet the end point of this leisure is not laziness but celebration. Carried away out of the straitness of the workaday world into the heart of the universe. In the second book, Pieper asks the question. What does philosophizing mean?"

books culture Josef Pieper philosophy psychology.

books culture Josef Pieper philosophy psychology.

Leisure has been, and always will be, the first foundation of any culture. Pieper maintains that our bourgeois world of total labor has vanquished leisure, and issues a startling warning: Unless we regain the art of silence and insight, the ability for non-activity, unless we substitute true leisure for our hectic amusements, we will destroy our culture ndash; and ourselves.

Recent champions of Pieper's philosophy in the English-speaking world include James V. Schall, . professor of political philosophy at Georgetown University, Joseph T. Lienhard, . Leisure, the Basis of Culture and The Philosophical Act. Translated by Alexander Dru. With an introduction by James V. Schall, SJ. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2009.

Teaching Note on. Josef Pieper’s Leisure the Basis of Culture An Integration of the Contemplative and Active Life. Pieper argues that the key to the moral and spiritual crisis of modern society is the refusal to receive, to accept a gift. While hedonism presents its own problems in a highly consumeristic and sexually saturated society, the larger problem, Pieper maintains, is the strange propensity toward hardship that is engraved into the face of our contemporaries as a distinct expectation of suffering.

Josef Pieper gives leisure an interesting definition: "Leisure is the disposition of receptive understanding, of.Fortunately, you do eventually reach these moments, making Leisure:The Basis of Culture a rewarding experience.

Josef Pieper gives leisure an interesting definition: "Leisure is the disposition of receptive understanding, of contemplative beholding, and immersion in the real. In other words, leisure is what To do philosophy is to realize the naturally essential inclination of the human mind toward totality. I often wonder why is Achilles always resting in The Iliad; at one point it almost feels like he is angry not with Agamemnon taking the slave girl but with Agamemnon denying his right to leisure.

James V. Schall, SJ, from the Foreword. Josef Pieper is one of the most renowned and popular philosophers of the 20th century. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. What’s Wrong with Democracy?

Pieper’s most renowned works.

Leisure: the basis of culture, by Josef Pieper/translated by Gerald Malsbary, South Bend, St. Augustine’s Press, 1948/1998, xx + 176 p. ISBN 1-890318-35-3. Originally published in German as Muße und Kult (Leisure and Worship) by Kösel-. Verlag in 1948, this book comprises two essay articles which together form one of Josef. Pieper’s most renowned works. Although they are distinctive in their own right, the two. articles, the title piece and The Philosophical Act, are indelibly connected in the way that

One of the most important philosophy titles published in the twentieth century, Josef Pieper's Leisure, the Basis of Culture is more significant, even more crucial, today than it was when it first appeared more than fifty years ago. This edition also includes his work The Philosophical Act. Leisure is an attitude of the mind and a condition of the soul that fosters a capacity to perceive the reality of the world. Pieper shows that the Greeks and medieval Europeans, understood the great value and importance of leisure. He also points out that religion can be born only in leisure -- a leisure that allows time for the contemplation of the nature of God. Leisure has been, and always will be, the first foundation of any culture. Pieper maintains that our bourgeois world of total labor has vanquished leisure, and issues a startling warning: Unless we regain the art of silence and insight, the ability for non-activity, unless we substitute true leisure for our hectic amusements, we will destroy our culture -- and ourselves.

Comments

Altad Altad
This book is really two in one. The first "Leisure, The Basis of Culture" and "The Philosophical Act."
The first book starts with the premise that "the foundation of Western culture is leisure." Something not easily appreciated in our hectic life. Yet the end point of this leisure is not laziness but celebration. "The most festive festival it is possible to celebrate is divine worship." I never thought of liturgy as leisure before I read this book. Pieper makes a wonderful point that liturgy does not serve any pratical purpose. Rather liturgy carries us into another dimenension. "Carried away out of the straitness of the workaday world into the heart of the universe."
In the second book, Pieper asks the question. "What does philosophizing mean?" For Pieper it means to step outside our everday world, "to see the stars above the roof, to preserve our apprehension of the universality of things in the midst of the habits of daily life." Wonderful!
Narim Narim
Our son, Chris, recently read this book and loved it. Since I've had it on my "to read" list for many years, I decided to give it a go.

As I say in my title, Pieper is not talking about leisure in the way that most people think. All I will say here is that leisure relates to school, learning, and having time to ponder what really matters.

Most Americans don't value the ancient idea (and ideal) of leisure. We are driven, distracted, and intoxicated with the tangible signs of success. We were created for so much more than these trivial pursuits.

Let Pieper show you the way forward!
Varshav Varshav
This short book of two essays is worth a two semester history class on what made Old Europe tick. Beautifully written and explains the concept of Leisure, and how it is not laziness as the "Protestant Work Ethic" worshipers would like you to believe.

If you're in the mood for some refreshing thinking on an old concept, that our European ancestors enjoyed, this book is for you.
DarK-LiGht DarK-LiGht
I've visited this book a few times only within the last year. Pieper is easily one the the most austue and beguiling authors I've read. His synthetic clarity and poignant insight are at once intellectually stimulating and personally uplifting. If you want a book that both serves to shatter the monotonous lense created by a functionalitic, production-driven worldview and impels the human being towards what is highest and greatest in an encounter with reality, pick this up. Both the Kindle e-book and the paperback are good investments. But consider both: one to peruse when there's nothing else better on the Kindle and the other to adorn your shelf for years to come!
Zainn Zainn
A bit dense, but very articulate about leisure, rest, and worship. I read through what I could and gleaned the ability to clarify and articulate a lot of my thoughts. Loved the discourse on the importance of placing proper priority on leisure in the overcoming of poverty. Defining the right of the whole person to leisure, that we're not meant to be cogs in a work machine. Helps us understand what it means to be human.
Blackworm Blackworm
Reading this brief book was a life-changing experience for me. Pieper, a philosopher in the tradition of St. Thomas Aquinas, leads the reader out of the barren world of endless busy-ness, direction-less activity, and enslavement to work, by revealing the crucial significance of leisure. Leisure is not at all idleness. It is contemplation of the wonder of the world around us and of the God who created all that is. This book is very important for those of us who are drowning in the frenzied, shallow, and ultimately meaningless world of purposeless work and soulless materialism. Pieper opens up to the reader the crucial importance of leisure, which is the key to discovering the wonder and purpose of our universe and the One who made it. Reading this book is a life-changing experience, and a powerful antidote to the soulless, frenzied chaos that dominates modern life. Leisure is not a mere vacation from work; it is the key to understanding why we exist. This is not an easy work--no masterpiece is--but it is well worth the effort it takes to understand the lessons Pieper teaches, lessons that will change your life.
Skillet Skillet
Pieper is a bit hard to read; not for technical language or abstraction, but it seems the translation from German is awkward. But the ideas are highly worth reviewing. His references to philosophical, social, and political elements of his thesis are valuable. He addresses the issue squarely and makes his points well: Investing time, energy, resources and status to the pursuit higher ideals than material security and enjoyments are essential. We will die without them. We will die with them too, but our lives will be vastly more significant.
A challenging read but a true groundbreaker that will change the way you think about what your everyday life is for.