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eBook The Divine Matrix: Creativity As Link Between East and West (Faith Meets Faith Series) ePub

eBook The Divine Matrix: Creativity As Link Between East and West (Faith Meets Faith Series) ePub

by Joseph A. Bracken

  • ISBN: 1570750041
  • Category: Religious Studies
  • Subcategory: Spirituality
  • Author: Joseph A. Bracken
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Orbis Books (June 1, 1995)
  • Pages: 179
  • ePub book: 1324 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1352 kb
  • Other: lit rtf mbr txt
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 342

Description

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In The Divine Matrix philosopher and theologian Joseph Bracken first locates the Infinite as transcendent source and goal of human activity as the notion common to virtually all the major world religions. This idea is consistent with the notion of eternal and continuous motion in Aristotle, with the "act of being" (actus essendi) in the theology of Thomas Aquinas and Meister Eckert, and with the ground of being of Shelling.

This creativity or creative power is what the author designates as the divine matrix in which all entities (including God . Overall, I thought Bracken made a compelling argument. However, I did take issue with him on a couple of points.

This creativity or creative power is what the author designates as the divine matrix in which all entities (including God himself) have their being. He appears to think that the classical theism of Thomistic metaphysics renders God static because it identifies God as being itself. Most process theologians appear to make this same mistake. But this is a misunderstanding of classical theism. Being" (God) is dynamic, not static.

The Divine Matrix book.

Keywords: bracken, creativity, XII, Joseph, Orbis Books, Divine Matrix, Maryknoll.

Faith Meets Faith Series. By (author) SJ Joseph Bracken.

The Divine Matrix - Process Theology Grown U. Joseph Bracken gives process thought the metaphysical depth it has long needed, finding in "creativity" an Ultimate Reality which can be called the divine matrix of all that happens

The Divine Matrix - Process Theology Grown Up. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 14 years ago. Process Theology is the name for a religious interpretation of reality built on the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead. Joseph Bracken gives process thought the metaphysical depth it has long needed, finding in "creativity" an Ultimate Reality which can be called the divine matrix of all that happens. Bracken also compares this notion of the Ultimate to analogous ideas in Hindu and Buddhist thought, thereby uncovering an openness to transcendence in traditions of many cultures.

Movies TV Shows Music Books Games DVDs/Blu-Ray People Art & Design Places Web TV & Podcasts Toys & Collectibles Comic Book Series Beauty Animals View more categories . . Explore. Manufacturer: Wipf & Stock Publishers Release date: 28 February 2006 ISBN-10 : 1597525944 ISBN-13: 9781597525947.

By Joseph A. BrackenS. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1995.

Orbis Books, ISBN 81-208-1416-9 (Google Books). The Holy Trinity as a Community of Divine Persons, I. The Heythrop Journal 15(2): 166-182 (PDF). The Holy Trinity as a Community of Divine Persons, II. The Heythrop Journal 15(3): 257-270 (PDF). Process Philosophy and Trinitarian Theology Process Studies 3(4): 217-230 (fulltext online).

Dialogue among religions has always been challenging. Today, the questions are becoming more fundamental: are the various traditions - Buddhist, Christian, Hindu, Tao - even talking about the same thing when they speak of Nature, or God, Emptiness or Brahman? The Divine Matrix represents a bold scholarly attempt to provide a framework for discussing theseand other - questions that will keep the interreligious dialogue project from grinding to a halt.In The Divine Matrix philosopher and theologian Joseph Bracken first locates the Infinite as transcendent source and goal of human activity as the notion common to virtually all the major world religions. He suggests that the Infinite is prototypically experienced not as an entity but as an ongoing activity - the principle of activity for all beings (God included). This idea is consistent with the notion of eternal and continuous motion in Aristotle, with the "act of being" (actus essendi) in the theology of Thomas Aquinas and Meister Eckert, and with the ground of being of Shelling and Heidegger, as well as with Whitehead's definition of "creativity." Bracken goes on to show that this idea is implicit in descriptions of Brahman in the Hindu Upanishads, in the experience of pratitya-samutpada ("dependent co-arising") in classical Buddhism, and in descriptions of the Tao in Tao Te Ching and Chuang Tzu.

Comments

Envias Envias
The author basically argues that Whitehead's "creativity" is what the the Eastern religions identify as ultimate reality. For Hinduism, this would be "Brahman." (Although, in my opinion, it should be more accurately identified with "shakti" - the divine energy which is experienced as "sat-chit-ananda" (being, consciousness, bliss) by the spiritual aspirant.) For Buddhism, this would be the "Void" ("emptiness" or "sunyata") which is experienced as "nirvana." And for Taoism, this would be the "Tao." This creativity or creative power is what the author designates as the divine matrix in which all entities (including God himself) have their being.

Overall, I thought Bracken made a compelling argument. However, I did take issue with him on a couple of points. He appears to think that the classical theism of Thomistic metaphysics renders God static because it identifies God as being itself. (Most process theologians appear to make this same mistake.) But this is a misunderstanding of classical theism. "Being" (God) is dynamic, not static. For while Aquinas may characterize God as "pure act" and therefore without any passive potency, this does not mean he is without any potency whatsoever. God has active potency. This is why he is considered to be omnipotent (all-powerful). In fact, I would argue that active potency in Thomistic metaphysics fulfills the same function that creativity does in Whiteheadian metaphysics. (All agents have active potency in Thomistic metaphysics even as all agents have creativity in Whiteheadian metaphysics.) Also, I would like to point out another misunderstanding that process theologians appear to have in regards to classical theism. They fail to understand that all contingent or finite beings participate in necessary or infinite being (i.e. God) and that they are brought into being by God's active potency. IOW, the God of classical theism also qualifies as an "all-in-God-ism" even as the God of neo-classical theism does.
Anaragelv Anaragelv
Process Theology is the name for a religious interpretation of reality built on the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead. He provided a framework for seeing that all things are always in process, and that that process includes a dimension of progress. But this framework did not adquately address the deeper questions our minds can ask -- why is there something rather than nothing? or: can there be a truly ultimate meaning or purpose to all things rather than just an endless sequence of events?

Joseph Bracken gives process thought the metaphysical depth it has long needed, finding in "creativity" an Ultimate Reality which can be called the divine matrix of all that happens.

Bracken also compares this notion of the Ultimate to analogous ideas in Hindu and Buddhist thought, thereby uncovering an openness to transcendence in traditions of many cultures.

This book is clearly for philosophers and theologians; the issues and language are not easy to deal with. But Bracken achieves what both philosophyers and theologians will recognize as a welcome clarity and directness.
Vital Beast Vital Beast
Useful approach to process theology