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eBook Rich Man, Poor Man - and the Bible ePub

eBook Rich Man, Poor Man - and the Bible ePub

by Conrad Boerma

  • ISBN: 0334014190
  • Category: Religious Studies
  • Subcategory: Spirituality
  • Author: Conrad Boerma
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Hymns Ancient & Modern Ltd (November 7, 2012)
  • Pages: 114
  • ePub book: 1629 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1451 kb
  • Other: mobi lit doc mbr
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 555

Description

Start by marking Rich Man, Poor Man And The Bible as Want to Read .

Start by marking Rich Man, Poor Man And The Bible as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The predominantly middle-class nature of most churches has led to the enshrining of the Protestant work ethic as almost an article of faith. But Boerma not only challenges unbiblical attitudes to poverty and the poor; he strikes right at the heart of every local church by revealing how far short of the New Testament ideal the contemporary church falls.

Rich Man, Poor Man And The Bible. Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author.

The Rich, the Poor and the Bible.

The predominantly middle-class nature of most churches has led to the enshrining of the Protestant work ethic as almost an article of faith. Ambition, prosperity, security are seen as virtues akin to godliness

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Shop with confidence. Rich Man, Poor Man And The Bible: By Conrad Boerma. Customs services and international tracking provided. GOOD DOCTOR, FREDDIE HIGHMORE/Rich Man,Poor Man/Calista Flockhart/Gabriel Soto.

Conrad Boerma shows how the Bible does not support this view, combing . According to Boerma, God identifies with the poor through Jesus, who was indifferent toward possession and renounced a middle-class upbringing.

Conrad Boerma shows how the Bible does not support this view, combing through Genesis to Revelation to show the Bible’s attitude toward poverty. Rediff Books - India's Largest online Books store. We stock every new title under various genres with endless array of enduring classics. Get the best offers on category name books at best prices in India with a facility of Free Shipping and Cash on Delivery (COD).

Rich Man, Poor Man is a 1969 novel by Irwin Shaw. It is the last of the novels of Shaw's middle period before he began to concentrate, in his last works such as Evening In Byzantium, Nightwork, Bread Upon The Waters, and Acceptable Losses, on the inevitability of impending death. The title is taken from the nursery rhyme "Tinker, Tailor". The novel was adapted into a 1976 miniseries.

Rich Man, Poor Man. Irwin Shaw. It was a windy early spring day, although not very cold, and he had a sense of well-being and holiday because of the light workout and the short practice. Most of the trees had already put out their leaves and there were buds everywhere.

John Capon, editor of the magazine Crusade, says of this book: `It is a sad fact that those who pride themselves most on knowing their Bibles are often the least tolerant of the poor. The predominantly middle-class nature of most churches has led to the enshrining of the Protestant work ethic as almost an article of faith. Ambition, prosperity, security are seen as virtues akin to godliness. The corollary, that poverty must be the product of laziness, lack of thrift and rootlessness, seems to be taken for granted. This book is a salutary corrective to any who think the Bible lends support to these views. With thoroughness and skill Conrad Boerma combs the biblical text from Genesis to Revelation and finds a consistency in its approach to poverty that must be taken seriously. He shows that the Bible always challenges poverty, which it sees as clearly linked to social structures. God identifies himself with the poor, most clearly in Jesus of Nazareth, who was not so much opposed to possessions as indifferent to them, renouncing his comfortable middle-class upbringing. But Boerma not only challenges unbiblical attitudes to poverty and the poor; he strikes right at the heart of every local church by revealing how far short of the New Testament ideal the contemporary church falls. Instead of providing the secular world with the prototype sharing, loving, compassionate community of men and women equal in the sight of God, he says 'congregations often consist of a number of closed social classes and detached individuals'. Well-meaning and well-planned evangelism is going to leave people cold unless the churches can catch some of the warmth of this book.'