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eBook Corpse in the Waxworks (A Monsieur Bencolin Mystery) ePub

eBook Corpse in the Waxworks (A Monsieur Bencolin Mystery) ePub

by John Dickson Carr

  • ISBN: 0060810394
  • Category: Mystery
  • Subcategory: Suspense and Obscurity
  • Author: John Dickson Carr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (July 1, 1990)
  • ePub book: 1621 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1830 kb
  • Other: lrf txt azw rtf
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 231

Description

John Dickson Carr descends from 'atmospheric' to 'lurid' in his Bencolin mysteries, and the midnight streets and .

John Dickson Carr descends from 'atmospheric' to 'lurid' in his Bencolin mysteries, and the midnight streets and night clubs of prewar Paris are a perfect setting for this tawdry, match-lit jewel of a mystery. The Corpse in the Waxworks (1932)" (alternate English title: "The Waxworks Murder") features the suave, manic-depressive M. Henri Bencolin, 'juge d'instruction' of the Seine, the head of the Parisian police. He is accompanied by his friend, the American Jeff Marle, who narrates and serves as Bencolin's straight man, muscle, and the guy who falls for all of the smouldering, silk-bosomed, possibly murderous mademoiselles.

Start by marking The Corpse in the Waxworks (Henri Bencolin, as. .

Start by marking The Corpse in the Waxworks (Henri Bencolin, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Monsieur Bencolin must infiltrate the Silver Key Club to solve the crime, where masked men and women thrill to secret and forbidden encounters. Couldn't really get into the stiff, formal 19th century French characters, although the narrator has his heroic moment. Beyond the few chapters where the narrator does some sleuthing of his own, he is a bare cypher.

Find nearly any book by John Dickson Carr. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Dark Of The Moon (Ulverscroft Mystery). by John Dickson Carr. ISBN 9780708944417 (978-0-7089-4441-7) Hardcover, Ulverscroft, 2001.

Carr, John Dickson, 1906-1977. New York : Macmillan Pub. Co. Collection. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by MyH-loader on October 6, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

John Dickson Carr The Corpse in the Waxworks (Henri Bencolin, Monsieur Bencolin must infiltrate the Silver Key Club.

L. The Devil in Velvet. The Corpse in the Waxworks (Henri Bencolin, by John Dickson Carr. Monsieur Bencolin must infiltrate the Silver Key Club. The Case of the Constant Suicides (Dr. Gideon Fell, by John Dickson Carr.

John Dickson Carr (November 30, 1906 – February 27, 1977) was an American author of detective stories, who also published using the pseudonyms Carter Dickson, Carr Dickson and Roger Fairbairn. Carr is generally regarded as one of the greatest writers of so-called "Golden Age" mysteries; complex, plot-driven stories in which the puzzle is paramount. He was influenced in this regard by the works of Gaston Leroux and by the Father Brown stories of G. K. Chesterton.

The Four False Weapons (The Monsieur Bencolin Mysteries, 5). John Dickson Carr.

The body of a young woman, who has been stabbed in the back, is found floating in the Seine River. The body of another young woman, with a knife in her back, is found in the arms of a wax figure, the "Satyr of the Seine", in a local wax museum. The Four False Weapons (The Monsieur Bencolin Mysteries, 5).

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Категория: Mystery, Detection, Thriller, Crime, Murder, Detective. The Skeleton in the Clock. Категория: Классический детектив.

He did look old then; thin and drawn and leathery of skin, a tired Mephistopheles

He did look old then; thin and drawn and leathery of skin, a tired Mephistopheles. Monsieur Galant was pleased to think himself a master of the apache's art. I struck with the handle of the knife, instead of using its blade. Galant pinched his nose.

Monsieur Bencolin investigates a series of baffling murders involving a gloomy wax museum and the mysterious Silver Key Club

Comments

Mr_TrOlOlO Mr_TrOlOlO
"The Corpse in the Waxworks (1932)" (alternate English title: "The Waxworks Murder") features the suave, manic-depressive M. Henri Bencolin, 'juge d'instruction' of the Seine, the head of the Parisian police. He is accompanied by his friend, the American Jeff Marle, who narrates and serves as Bencolin's straight man, muscle, and the guy who falls for all of the smouldering, silk-bosomed, possibly murderous mademoiselles. Think of Archie Goodwin knocking off deadly Parisian apaches and rescuing Chanel-clad damsels-in-distress at the instigation of a thin, neurotic, chain-smoking, Mephistophelean Nero Wolfe.

In this case, the body of a pretty young woman is discovered draped across the waxen arms of the Satyr of Seine, in a murky, subterranean museum that very much resembles Madame Tussaud's (which, after all, started out as a waxworks exhibit in the pre-Revolution Palais Royale). Soon it is difficult to tell the real corpses from the glassy-eyed, waxen tableaux such as the aforementioned Satyr, the Spanish Inquisitors and their wracked victims, or Marat lying backwards out of his tin bath, "his jaw fallen, the ribs starting through his bluish skin, a claw hand plucking at the knife in his bloody chest."

The waxworks museum also has a secret passageway that leads M. Bencolin and Jeff to the notorious Silver Key club, whose masked members indulge in midnight orgies of jazz, champagne, and secret assignations.

John Dickson Carr descends from 'atmospheric' to 'lurid' in his Bencolin mysteries, and the midnight streets and night clubs of prewar Paris are a perfect setting for this tawdry, match-lit jewel of a mystery. Let yourself go and prowl with this author through the green-lit grotto of the waxworks, mingle with the masked French aristocrats as they dance to "the fleshy beat of a tango" in the infamous Silver Key club, hide behind the lily-clad coffin of the young murder victim and spy on those who might have killed her. It doesn't get more Jazz-age decadent than "The Corpse in the Waxworks."
Tygokasa Tygokasa
"The Corpse in the Waxworks (1932)" (alternate English title: "The Waxworks Murder") features the suave, manic-depressive M. Henri Bencolin, 'juge d'instruction' of the Seine, the head of the Parisian police. He is accompanied by his friend, the American Jeff Marle, who narrates and serves as Bencolin's straight man, muscle, and the guy who falls for all of the smouldering, silk-bosomed, possibly murderous mademoiselles. Think of Archie Goodwin knocking off deadly Parisian apaches and rescuing Chanel-clad damsels-in-distress at the instigation of a thin, neurotic, chain-smoking, Mephistophelean Nero Wolfe.

In this case, the body of a pretty young woman is discovered draped across the waxen arms of the Satyr of Seine, in a murky, subterranean museum that very much resembles Madame Tussaud's (which, after all, started out as a waxworks exhibit in the pre-Revolution Palais Royale). Soon it is difficult to tell the real corpses from the glassy-eyed, waxen tableaux such as the aforementioned Satyr, the Spanish Inquisitors and their wracked victims, or Marat lying backwards out of his tin bath, "his jaw fallen, the ribs starting through his bluish skin, a claw hand plucking at the knife in his bloody chest."

The waxworks museum also has a secret passageway that leads M. Bencolin and Jeff to the notorious Silver Key club, whose masked members indulge in midnight orgies of jazz, champagne, and secret assignations.

John Dickson Carr descends from 'atmospheric' to 'lurid' in his Bencolin mysteries, and the midnight streets and night clubs of prewar Paris are a perfect setting for this tawdry, match-lit jewel of a mystery. Let yourself go and prowl with this author through the green-lit grotto of the waxworks, mingle with the masked French aristocrats as they dance to "the fleshy beat of a tango" in the infamous Silver Key club, hide behind the lily-clad coffin of the young murder victim and spy on those who might have killed her. It doesn't get more Jazz-age decadent than "The Corpse in the Waxworks."