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eBook Case Histories: A Novel ePub

eBook Case Histories: A Novel ePub

by Kate Atkinson

  • ISBN: 0316010707
  • Category: Mystery
  • Subcategory: Suspense and Obscurity
  • Author: Kate Atkinson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Back Bay Books (October 17, 2005)
  • Pages: 336
  • ePub book: 1221 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1439 kb
  • Other: rtf mbr docx lrf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 170

Description

I trusted her advice; she's an avid reader.

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. I trusted her advice; she's an avid reader. That book was Life After Life.

Home Kate Atkinson Case Histories. A wonderful novel told by a great storyteller who knows just how to create a voice, an image, a metaphor. Case Histories is a wonderfully tricky boo. he lifelike characters are what make it such a compelling hybrid: part complex family drama, part mystery. It winds up having more depth and vividness than ordinary thrillers and more thrills than ordinary fiction, with a constant awareness of perils swirling beneath its surface. On the way, Brodie learns something about himself, not in the clichéd way one expects.

Case Histories (2004) is a detective novel by British author Kate Atkinson and is set in Cambridge, England. It introduces Jackson Brodie, a former police inspector and now private investigator. The plot revolves around three seemingly unconnected family tragedies – the disappearance of a three-year-old girl from a garden; the murder of a husband by his wife with an axe; and the apparently motiveless murder of a solicitor's daughter.

Her first novel, Behind the Scenes at the Museum, won the 1995 Whitbread Book of the Year ahead of Salman Rushdie's The Moor's Last Sigh and Roy Jenkins's biography of William Ewart Gladstone

Her first novel, Behind the Scenes at the Museum, won the 1995 Whitbread Book of the Year ahead of Salman Rushdie's The Moor's Last Sigh and Roy Jenkins's biography of William Ewart Gladstone. It went on to be a Sunday Times bestseller. Since then, she has published another five novels, one play, and one collection of short stories.

If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: G.

If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: GO. Exact matches. Started Early, Took My Dog. Kate Atkinson. Download (EPUB). Читать.

Аудиокнига "Case Histories: A Novel", Kate Atkinson. Читает Susan Jameson. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы

Аудиокнига "Case Histories: A Novel", Kate Atkinson. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

Kate Atkinson has put away the crockery, closed up the dishwasher and gone out of the kitchen door into the dark.

Kate Atkinson has put away the crockery, closed up the dishwasher and gone out of the kitchen door into the dark

Kate Atkinson Case Histories The first book in the Jackson Brodie series, 2004 For Anne Mclntyre Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free. John 8:32 Chapter 1. CASE HISTORY NO.

Kate Atkinson Case Histories The first book in the Jackson Brodie series, 2004 For Anne Mclntyre Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free. I 1970 Family PlotHow lucky were they? A heat wave in the middle of the school holidays, exactly where it belonged. Every morning the sun was up long before they were, making a mockery of the flimsy summer curtain. The first book in the Jackson Brodie series, 2004. Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free. Chapter 1. I 1970.

Atkinson Kate - скачать бесплатно все книги автора

Atkinson Kate - скачать бесплатно все книги автора. Книги 1-3 из 3. Case Histories. The title of Kate Atkinson’s novel, One Good Turn, could describe the way that one character’s Good Samaritan behavior leads to him being robbed, mistakenly identified as a murder victim, and more.

The first book in Kate Atkinson's Jackson Brodie Mysteries series, called "The best mystery of the decade" by Stephen King, finds private investigator Jackson Brodie following three seemingly unconnected family mysteries in Edinburgh

Comments

Morlunn Morlunn
I’m giving this book a five star rating. Having stated that, I’ll also tell you that when I finished this book, I went to amazon.com and read all of the one star ratings (the worst) by readers, and I pretty much agreed with all of them. How is such a thing possible? Well, you really can’t explain such a concept or idea, unless you’ve actually read a Kate Atkinson novel.

First, Kate Atkinson’s books, while not really necessarily depressing, are certainly filled with depressing people. I’m thoroughly convinced after reading several of her books, that this author had a pretty miserable, warped childhood. When all you know is heartache, depression, and trauma, how can you really be expected to write about anything else? She always injects humorous observations and witty descriptions throughout the pages, which makes you laugh out loud at the same time as you’re reading about the lives of these sad lugs.

Next, we must remember that Atkinson’s strength is writing about people and their thoughts, feelings, and emotions. She doesn’t necessarily tell a linear story. This book was labeled as the first of one of her many “Jackson Brodie Novels”. Jackson Brodie is a detective, yet these books are not in the traditional “whodunnit” vein. If you’re looking for a good mystery novel, the Jackson Brodie series probably shouldn’t be your first choice.

Yes, this book does have a few crime investigations running through it. We get a missing child, a random murder of a child, and, what could be described as an “ax murder”. What’s unique is that these incidents happen in different times and in different places, and Atkinson’s skilled writing manages to somehow make all of these situations current, which is when we meet Jackson Brodie. Jackson (obviously) is just as miserable as all of the people affected by all of these tragedies. He had a rotten childhood, a rotten marriage, manages to get beat up a lot, and on and on and on.

Once we arrive at the book’s conclusion, many were disappointed at the abruptness of the finale, and felt that things were thrown together to conveniently to appear the slightest bit realistic. Those observations are correct. As stated, though, this book is about people and not necessarily events.

If you have the stomach for books such as this (and I haven’t even discussed the foul language, the sex, the suicides, etc.), you’ll probably find it enjoyable as I did. I’ll probably have to wait several months before I read the next book by this author. And when I do, I’ll ensure to have some Prozac handy.
Aedem Aedem
A college friend with whom I'm still in contact after 45 years recommended a Kate Atkinson book on Facebook. I trusted her advice; she's an avid reader. That book was Life After Life. It is still one of my favorite reads. Immediately I read Behind the Scene at the Museum at the museum. It too is a favorite. Another reader whom I admire has read both those titles, adding she loved every one of the Jackson Brodie novels, Case Histories being the first in the series. I set out to read every one. The three case histories that open this novel feature sharply drawn, complex characters. In the first two histories, parents love children with such deep and abiding love; their thoughts about their children are poignant and exquisitely crafted. In the third case history, a parent suffers and stumbles into a moment that ruins hopes and dreams. Soon Jackson Brodie intersects with these three seemingly separate and entirely different histories. He is a rich character, less tragically burdened than most detectives who've witnessed the worst that man inflicts upon another man. He is smart, human, and ironic. Readers like him--at least this one does--I liked him enough to read the second in the Jackson Brodie series, but that's another title, another mystery, and another adventure. Follow the advice of my friends. Read Kate Atkinson. That is all.
The Apotheoses of Lacspor The Apotheoses of Lacspor
This book is a quandary because there are 28 quite separate and individual chapters and it is only in the last few that you grasp how they are fit together. Perhaps, a more intelligent reader could recognise in the context of each individual chapter, the links that hold it together, but for the average reader, it was a little confusing. It is a very different kind of detective novel from the usual and perhaps that is the writer's style and some people love it. However, as the individual case histories are so complete in themselves, it is a frustrating book in that you keep wanting to make lists of who everyone is and what happens. For a casual reader, reading only 1 chapter at a sitting, it becomes quite an effort to remember what happened before to this next character you have not seen for 5-6 chapters, and this applies to all the characters. There are some comic moments and great comments from the individuals but the book failed to entice the present reader because of its structure.
Mallador Mallador
Novels where the narrative point of view changes with each chapter are, to me, double-edges swords. They offer perspective and insight into more characters, but they can also leave you feeling a bit confused. I think they are actually easier to read in physical books -- because you can flip back and remind yourself who so-and-so was.

I was on a Kindle and I set the book down for a while at the 20% mark. So it was disorienting to try to re-enter. But when I did I finished it in one day. Watching the pieces shift and shift again in the story, willing to be slightly off-balanced in the fragmented narrative.

I enjoyed the way characters were layered, allowing the reader to discover a little bit at a time, and to question assumptions made in earlier chapters.

The timeline was a bit confusing to me -- not the backstory elements which were labeled...but the "now" of the story. Things seem to occur out of sequence and then fast forward. It made me think of a kaleidoscope --- but in the end the pieces fit (perhaps a little too neatly) and I was glad to spend time swirling around in it.