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eBook Prague Fatale (Bernie Gunther) ePub

eBook Prague Fatale (Bernie Gunther) ePub

by Philip Kerr

  • ISBN: 1410448568
  • Category: Mystery
  • Subcategory: Suspense and Obscurity
  • Author: Philip Kerr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Thorndike Press; Large Print edition (May 2, 2012)
  • Pages: 635
  • ePub book: 1880 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1694 kb
  • Other: txt mbr rtf lrf
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 404

Description

Praise for Philip Kerr and the Bernie Gunther Novels. Philip Kerr is the New York Times bestselling author of the acclaimed Bernie Gunther novels, two of which-Field Gray and The Lady from Zagreb-were finalists for the Edgar® Award for Best Novel.

Praise for Philip Kerr and the Bernie Gunther Novels. A brilliantly innovative thriller writer. Salman Rushdie Philip Kerr is the only bona fide heir to Raymond Chandler. com In terms of narrative, plot, pace and characterization, Kerr’s in a league with John le Carré.

This is the eighth book featuring Bernie Gunther, Philip Kerr's Berlin detective. The series has taken Bernie from the 1930's, as the Nazis are coming to power, to 1950, when he gets caught up in Cold War espionage, and now back to the war years. Prague Fatale is set in 1941 and Bernie has returned from the Eastern Front – where he has seen unspeakable horrors – to the Berlin Kriminalpolizei ( Kripo ), where he is investigating the murder of a Dutch railroad worker and contemplating suicide.

Prague Fatale (Bernie Gunther). 480 Pages · 2011 · . MB · 1 Downloads ·English. Gunther McGrath argues that it’s time to go beyond the very concept of sustainable competitive advantage. Scrum - A Pocket Guide - Van Haren. 1 MB·11,479 Downloads. Gunther has described everything about Scrum in well-formed, clearly written and Scrum Scrum - A Pocket Guide. Langenscheidt Großwörterbuch Deutsch als Fremdsprache : das einsprachige Wörterbuch für alle, die Deutsch lernen. 68 MB·4,473 Downloads·German·New!

Former detective and reluctant SS officer Bernie Gunther must infiltrate a brutal world of spies, partisan terrorists, and high-level traitors in this clever and compelling (The Daily Beast) New York Times bestseller from Philip Kerr.

Former detective and reluctant SS officer Bernie Gunther must infiltrate a brutal world of spies, partisan terrorists, and high-level traitors in this clever and compelling (The Daily Beast) New York Times bestseller from Philip Kerr. Bernie is back from the Eastern Front, once again working homicide in Berlin's Kripo and answering to Reinhard Heydrich, a man he both detests and fears. Heydrich has been newly named Reichsprotector of Czechoslovakia.

First published in Great Britain in 2011 by. Quercus. To all outside eyes I was the same man I had always been: Bernie Gunther, Kriminal Commissar, from the Alex; and yet I was merely a blur of who I had been. A knot of feelings felt with gritted teeth and a lump in the throat and an awful echoing lonely cavern in the pit of my stomach.

Philip Ballantyne Kerr (22 February 1956 – 23 March 2018) was a British author, best known for his Bernie Gunther series of historical detective thrillers. Kerr was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, where his father was an engineer and his mother worked as a secretary. He was educated at a grammar school in Northampton. He studied at the University of Birmingham from 1974 to 1980, gaining a master's degree in law and philosophy.

Philip Kerr on PRAGUE FATALE: "I am afraid I cannot discuss the plot of this book except to say that it is no longer called THE MAN WITH THE IRON HEART. It turned out that there was another book with that title. My book, half of which is set in Prague, is now called Prague Fatale. It's set in October 1941. Think the Golem of Prague with Nazis.

A Bernie Gunther Novel. Część 8. Philip Kerr17 kwietnia 2012. Former detective and reluctant SS officer Bernie Gunther must infiltrate a brutal world of spies, partisan terrorists, and high-level traitors in this clever and compelling (The Daily Beast) New York Times bestseller from Philip Kerr. Przełącz na audiobooka.

Philip Kerr - This article is about the British novelist. For the British politician and diplomat, see Philip Kerr, 11th Marquess of Lothian

Bernie Gunther returns to his desk on homicide from the horrors of the Eastern Front to find Berlin changed, and for the worse. Philip Kerr - This article is about the British novelist. For the British politician and diplomat, see Philip Kerr, 11th Marquess of Lothian. Philip Kerr (born 22 February 1956 in Edinburgh) is a British author of both adult fiction and non fiction, mos.

Bernie Gunther returns to his desk on homicide from the horrors of the Eastern Front to find Berlin changed for the worse.

Comments

Mazuzahn Mazuzahn
I find historical fiction grounded in fact irresistible. When a plot rests on events that really took place and characters who really lived, I’m prepared to give the author a little slack if the writing style is less than engaging.

A hard-boiled detective in Hitler’s Germany

Fortunately, I don’t have to make any such compromise when it comes to Philip Kerr’s series of novels featuring Berlin detective Bernie Gunther. I’ve just finished reading Prague Fatale, the eighth book in the series. I’m still in thrall to the author and his protagonist. Bernie stands comparison to Philip Marlowe or any other fictional hard-boiled detective in mid-century America. Yet his beat was Berlin under Hitler.

Narrative and dialogue that’s supremely entertaining

In more ways than one, Bernie resembles Marlowe. He’s tough, of course. He’s a big guy who appeals to women. And his wisecracks are nonstop. For example, he refers to Nazi Germany as “the least democratic European state since Vlad III impaled his first Wallachian Boyar.” And this: “Investigating a murder in the autumn of 1941 was like arresting a man for vagrancy during the Depression.” Then there’s this about his relationship with Reinhard Heydrich, one of the main architects of the Holocaust: “from time to time I’m useful to him in the same way a toothpick might be useful to a cannibal.” And Bernie actually talks like this. His wisecracks aren’t limited to the narrative. Admittedly, some of this humor is far from universal, but I find it supremely entertaining.

The assassination of Reinhard Heydrich

Prague Fatale opens with Bernie on a train from Prague to Berlin, accompanying Heydrich’s corpse. It’s June 1942, and Czech partisans have finally succeeded in killing him. Against this background, the action shifts back to the autumn of 1941. Heydrich has summoned Bernie to Prague to protect him against an assassination attempt — from within his own ranks. Bernie learns that the assassin might be any one among the large assembly of high-ranking Nazi officers the General has brought together in the country villa he commandeered. This brings him face to face with many of the leading war criminals in the Nazi hierarchy, each seemingly more monstrous than the last.

Suspense builds, and surprises mount

The plot in Prague Fatale revolves around the murder of a Dutch “guest worker,” the death of a presumed Czech spy, and Bernie’s affair with a beautiful prostitute. (There’s always a beautiful woman at Bernie’s side.) As his investigation proceeds in the villa, all these threads of the story eventually come together. The suspense builds, and the surprises mount. This is truly a superior crime thriller. It’s also well worthwhile reading as historical fiction alone. Philip Kerr does great research.
Doomwarden Doomwarden
A really enjoyable book, well up to the standard of previous 'Bernie Gunther' novels, and perhaps, better than some.
The author, Philip Kerr, takes us to late 1941 and early 1942 when Reinhard Heydrich has been made Reichsprotector of Bohemia and Moravia and calls upon our eponymous hero Bernie Gunther of the Berlin police for assistance. Much of the action in the latter two thirds of the book takes place in the Lower Castle at Panenske Brezany, a short distance from Prague, the new requisitioned home of General Heydrich. The house was previously occupied by the sugar millionaire Bloch-Bauer whose wife was painted by Gustave Klimt.
The story is very well constructed and allows us to become acquainted with a number of senior real life figures in the Nazi force of occupation. Many readers will be familiar with the fate of Heydrich in Prague but this in no way detracts from the interest or tension in the narrative.
This book contains all the essential ingredients that fans of Bernie Gunther have come to expect and, for me, is one of the best books in the series that I have read so far. An excellent story and superb writing style that never disappoints.
SadLendy SadLendy
Despite his overuse of similes and metaphors, I have come to appreciate Philip Kerr's talent and his novels about the Third Reich, and this one is no exception. Although the plot seems a bit scattered at first, it does come together in the end--more or less. What doesn't ring quite true is Gunther's confrontation with Heydrich and his threat to bring him down. True, Gunther has an occasional death wish, but to threaten a murderous psychopath with the kind of power Heydrich had would not only be foolish, it would be downright insane. This seems to me a considerable departure from Gunther's fear of the man. The other aspect of this story that didn't ring true is Heydrich's attempt to buy Gunther's silence.

I've long been fascinated by Reinhard Heydrich, who, next to Hitler himself, was considered by many to be the most powerful man in Germany, and indeed next in line to become the Fuhrer. He was widely feared and loathed by his German contemporaries, who may have played a role in his demise. Kerr does a good job of portraying Heydrich as he actually was, if available nonfiction on the subject is accurate. If anything, Kerr may have been a bit too kind in his characterization. Regardless, it's obvious that considerable research was done on the subject of Germany's hierarchy as it existed during the war.