cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Dogs of Riga (Kurt Wallander Mystery)
eBook Dogs of Riga (Kurt Wallander Mystery) ePub

eBook Dogs of Riga (Kurt Wallander Mystery) ePub

by Dick Hill,Henning Mankell

  • ISBN: 078614839X
  • Category: Mystery
  • Subcategory: Suspense and Obscurity
  • Author: Dick Hill,Henning Mankell
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Blackstone Audio Inc (December 1, 2006)
  • ePub book: 1966 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1806 kb
  • Other: docx txt lit mbr
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 650

Description

Home Henning Mankell The Dogs of Riga: A Kurt Wallendar Mystery. Other Kurt Wallander mysteries by Henning Mankell.

Home Henning Mankell The Dogs of Riga: A Kurt Wallendar Mystery. The Dogs of Riga: A Kurt Wallendar Mystery, .

This second novel in Henning Mankell's Kurt Wallander series is a bit slower than the first, but is full of twists and turns. It is a mult-layered mystery that takes place beginning in Ystad and ends in the Baltic country of Latvia and the city of Riga. The story starts when a life raft washes ashore near Ystad with two well-dressed dead men in it and they are eventually traced to Latvia. Wallander and his police department work on the case, but trying to identify these men and find out who killed them is nearly impossible.

Shelves: mystery, thriller I might try for a third book in this Henning Mankell series, hoping The Dogs of Riga was a fluke, and hoping Wallander will snap out a little out of his manic depressive.

Shelves: mystery, thriller. Kurt Wallander, Swedish detective, is inexplicably sent to Latvia to investigate the death of a Latvian police officer who was killed. Wallander doesn't know why he's in Latvia. Henning Mankell doesn't appear to know why Wallander is in Latvia. I don't know why Wallander is in Latvia. I might try for a third book in this Henning Mankell series, hoping The Dogs of Riga was a fluke, and hoping Wallander will snap out a little out of his manic depressive obsessions. Jul 23, 2013 Gavin rated it it was amazing.

The Dogs of Rig: A Kurt Wallander Mystery Henning Mankell . Henning Mankell was born in Stockholm, Sweden on February 3, 1948. He was committed to the fight against AIDS.

Henning Mankell was born in Stockholm, Sweden on February 3, 1948. He left secondary school at the age of 16 and worked as a merchant seaman. While working as a stagehand, he wrote his first play, The Amusement Park.

Электронная книга "The Dogs of Riga: A Kurt Wallendar Mystery", Henning Mankell

Электронная книга "The Dogs of Riga: A Kurt Wallendar Mystery", Henning Mankell. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Dogs of Riga: A Kurt Wallendar Mystery" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

"The Grave: A Kurt Wallander Mystery by Henning Mankell". Comprehensive Henning Mankell fan site. Retrieved 6 October 2015. Henning Mankell: the artist of the Parallax View – Slavoj Zizek. The Mirror of Crime: Henning Mankell interview at Tangled Web (5/2001). Guardian Interview (11/2003).

Inspector Kurt Wallander and his team determine that the men were Eastern European criminals. In Riga, Wallander must deal with widespread governmental corruption, which opens his eyes to the chilling reality of life in the totalitarian Eastern Bloc: grim, harrowing and volatile. But what appears in Sweden to be an open-and-shut case soon plunges Wallander into an alien world of police surveillance, thinly veiled threats, and life-endangering lies. Wallander's introspection and self-doubt make him compellingly real, and his efforts to find out what happened to those men on the life raft makes for riveting reading.

Other Kurt Wallander mysteries by Henning Mankell.

Comments

Thordigda Thordigda
This second novel in Henning Mankell's Kurt Wallander series is a bit slower than the first, but is full of twists and turns. It is a mult-layered mystery that takes place beginning in Ystad and ends in the Baltic country of Latvia and the city of Riga. The story starts when a life raft washes ashore near Ystad with two well-dressed dead men in it and they are eventually traced to Latvia. Wallander and his police department work on the case, but trying to identify these men and find out who killed them is nearly impossible.

A policeman from Riga named Liepa comes to Ystad to work with police and Wallander on the case. Major Liepa seems to be an honest man and serious about his work, although he chain smokes so much that it drives the others, including Wallander, crazy. There is no smoking allowed in the Ystad police station.

The story takes place after the fall of the Berlin wall and the beginning of the end of the Soviet Union. Life in the Eastern Bloc is dreary and people aren't free like they are in Sweden. The mood is as dreary as the weather but Wallander must find out who has killed the men in the life raft and also solve another difficult murder that happens in Riga. It is also interesting that he brings up the case that he solved in the previous book, "Faceless Killers" several times in "The Dogs of Riga."

Wallander finds himself in Riga, Latvia after Major Liepa returns home, but he's confused, followed and watched the whole time he's there and isn't even sure why he is there and what he's supposed to be doing. It is winter and sleet, snow and extreme cold are what he is faced with in addition to Latvian police officers that he doesn't trust. Par for the course for Wallander, he hardly ever gets enough sleep or food and winds up exhausted, but running from people who don't want the best for you can make eating and sleeping very hard to do. He keeps in touch with his father who is as cantankerous as always. Wallander returns to Sweden only to go back to Riga under the guise of going skiing in the Alps. He must locate some crucial information before it is too late. This is a very action-packed part of the book.

A very enjoyable novel and I am soon on to the third in the Kurt Wallander series.
Gaua Gaua
I'm a Henning Mankell fan and have had a long time desire to visit Sweden. Therefore I get some vicarious pleasure from these books, and they are short which can be refreshing. The Dogs of Riga is, by far, my favorite. One of the main characters has moved on (did he die? I don't remember:-) anyway, long suffering Kurt Wallendar, is still around and so is his relationship with his father. The detective finally decides to do something about his health while trying to solve a mystery of how two tortured bodies, shot at close range, guessed to be from the Eastern Bloc could drift ashore in a life boat w/out any markings. I'm about halfway through it but am enjoying it immensely
Malahelm Malahelm
Having heard so much about Baiba in later Kurt Wallander books it's good to get to know her, and she is, somewhat to my surprise, an innocent, fragile person, but by no means helpless. This story is loaded with action, violence and cliffhanging danger--with many scenes of genuinely threatening, potentially lethal peril to both Kurt and Baiba. "The Dogs of Riga" would make a fantastic film! I have a friend from Latvia, and will give her a copy for Christmas. Since she, too, tells horrific stories of the Stalinist legacy of ruling commissars, I expect the perils of the plot will strike some responsive chords. Politically both of us are left-liberals, definitely not right-wing anarchists and followers of violent talk show hosts. I'm a Socialist. I can't imagine anyone except a rigid Fascist wanting to be ruled by a wealthy, power-crazed oligarchy, spied upon by the government, jailed without habeas corpus for revealing unconstitutional activities, and slandered for wanting justice and peace--which seems to be the way our own country has been going since at least 1981, and why both my friend and I are political, social and economic activists. And it's why (although the NeoCons complained) the Soviet and other Soviet bloc reformers of the late 1980s and 90s--the period of this novel--were universally referred to as "liberals".
Whilingudw Whilingudw
In THE DOGS OF RIGA-- both four-legged and two-legged--Inspector Kurt Wallander is back with another difficult crime to solve. Two dead men, dressed to the nines, wash ashore in Ystad in a life raft. As usual, initially there are practically no clues. This crime takes Wallander away from Sweden into Latvia, a place he finds colder-- if that's possible-- than his homeland. He warms up, of course, when he falls in love with the widow of another murdered character, Major Liepa of Riga. Inspector Wallander remains the character fans of Mankell have come to love. He doesn't always get along with his father and daughter or his police superiors, he on the best of days bends the rules of conducting an investigation, on other days he breaks them, he doesn't eat well, he has trouble with the opposite sex and he's a tad hypochondriacal but still loves opera. Does he sound like someone you know?

I found myself not liking this novel as much as previous ones I have read by Mr. Mankell. It may have been that he was writing about locales and people very foreign to him. On the other hand, a B novel by this most talented of writers is better than those of dozens of his contemporaries.

As always, Mr. Mankell writes about big issues, in this instance "the revolutionary events that took place in the Baltic countries during the last year" as he says in a rare "Afterword" written in 1992. He remains one of our very best crime writers.