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eBook The October Killings (Abigail Bukula Mysteries) ePub

eBook The October Killings (Abigail Bukula Mysteries) ePub

by Wessel Ebersohn

  • ISBN: 0312655959
  • Category: Mystery
  • Subcategory: Suspense and Obscurity
  • Author: Wessel Ebersohn
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Minotaur Books; First Edition edition (January 18, 2011)
  • Pages: 320
  • ePub book: 1301 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1999 kb
  • Other: lrf docx lit mobi
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 939

Description

Ebersohn is a brilliant storyteller who weaves a masterful, tautly written tale of suspense in The October Killings. 2 people found this helpful.

Ebersohn is a brilliant storyteller who weaves a masterful, tautly written tale of suspense in The October Killings. I look forward to his next book, hopefully again featuring Abigail, Yudel and Freek.

The October Killings, the first novel in decades from Wessel Ebersohn, not only brings to life the new South Africa in all of its color and complexity but also Abigail Bukula-the sharpest, most determined sleuth in international crime.

The October Killings, the first novel in decades from Wessel Ebersohn, not only brings to life the new South Africa in all of its color and complexity but also Abigail Bukula-the sharpest, most determined sleuth in international crime fiction. By the time the ten armored personnel carriers started moving, the trees on the far side of the valley had long faded into poorly defined shadow. .Like most nineteen-year-olds of his time and culture, Leon was a patriot. He knew that, if need be, he was willing to die to defend his country. Abigail Bukula was fifteen-years-old when the white apartheid security forces crossed into Lesotho and attacke.

Abigail Bukula, introduced in The October Killings (2011), returns in this intense story that reaches back into Zimbabwe’s violent past.

When Abigail Bukula, a young lawyer in the South African Justice Department, learns that the secret son of her aunt, who died in a massacre years ago, has been arrested by the Zimbabwean government, she races to his aid. She’s as determined as ever but perhaps a bit naive as well. Accused of being a part of the so-called Harare Seven, her cousin is being held as a political prisoner in the country’s most brutal prison. Abigail Bukula, introduced in The October Killings (2011), returns in this intense story that reaches back into Zimbabwe’s violent past.

The October Killings. Abigail Bukula Mysteries (Volume 1) Wessel Ebersohn St. Martin's Press. Abigail Bukula was fifteen when her parents were killed in a massacre of antiapartheid activists by white security forces. Because a soldier spoke in her defense, she was spared.

Abigail Bukula is a brilliant lawyer in the South African justice department. She finds an unlikely ally in the eccentric prison psychologist Yudel Gordon

Abigail Bukula is a brilliant lawyer in the South African justice department. For twenty years she has closed her mind to the past, trying to forget the defence force raid when a good man, fighting for an evil cause, saved her life. Or the night that followed when an evil man, fighting for a noble cause, saved her again. She finds an unlikely ally in the eccentric prison psychologist Yudel Gordon. The October Killings sees this popular hero of three of the author’s earlier books making a formidable team with Abigail Bukula, the sharpest heroine of the new South Africa. Thriller & Crime. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Freek rose and smiled as they entered. He held Abigail’s offered hand in both of his for longer than necessary. Miss Bukula, he said

Freek rose and smiled as they entered. Miss Bukula, he said. There was a warmth in his eyes that Freek reserved for members of the opposite sex. Forgive me for intruding, Abigail said. She too was smiling warmly. There’s nothing to forgive, Freek said

Abigail Bukula was fifteen years old when her parents were killed in a massacre of antiapartheid activists by white apartheid security forces. The October Killings - Wessel Ebersohn.

Abigail Bukula was fifteen years old when her parents were killed in a massacre of antiapartheid activists by white apartheid security forces. Because a young soldier spoke up in her defense, she was spared. Now she's a lawyer with a promising career in the new government, and while she has done her best to put the tragedy behind her, she's never forgotten Leon Lourens, the soldier who saved her life. The convoy stayed in the shadow of the hillside until after darkness had fallen.

In The October Killings, we come to know Abigail Bukula. An enjoyable read, The October Killings is highly recommended for those who love foreign political thrillers. Abigail was fifteen years old when her parents were killed in a massacre of anti-apartheid activists by white apartheid security forces. This book is obviously a serial killer story but as I have seen in many other non-American authors, the characters of The October Killings have heart and soul. Abigail and Yudel are not invincible and have to overcome their fear of losing the precious safety. Now she's a lawyer with the new government, and while she has tried to put the tragedy behind her, she has never forgotten that soldier.

Abigail Bukula was fifteen years old when her parents were killed in a massacre of antiapartheid activists by white apartheid security forces. Because a young soldier spoke up in her defense, she was spared. Now she’s a lawyer with a promising career in the new government, and while she has done her best to put the tragedy behind her, she’s never forgotten Leon Lourens, the soldier who saved her life. So when he walks into her office almost twenty years later, needing her help, she vows to do whatever she can.  Someone is slowly killing off members of the team who raided the house where her parents were murdered, and now Leon and an imprisoned colonel are the only targets left.

Abigail turns to Yudel Gordon, an eccentric, nearly retired white prison psychologist for help. To save Leon’s life they must untangle the web of politics, identity, and history before the anniversary of the raid—only days away.

The October Killings, the first novel in decades from Wessel Ebersohn, not only brings to life the new South Africa in all of its color and complexity but also Abigail Bukula—the sharpest, most determined sleuth in international crime fiction.

Comments

Daigrel Daigrel
A good read!!.....
Wen Wen
Abigail Bakula heads up the gender desk in South Africa's Justice Department in 2005 and her husband is a prominent newspaper editor. But when a hero's name surfaces at work, she's plunged right back to the night 20 years before when she, age 15, watched her father die in a raid on an ANC safe house.

When a frightened white man, Leon Lourens, comes to see her in fear for his life and tells her that members of the apartheid-government security squad present that night are being ritually executed one by one on the anniversary of the raid, Bakula needs no reminding as to who Lourens is.

He's the man who saved her life, standing up to his captain, Marinus van Jaarsveld, who is currently spending his days in maximum security at Pretoria Central Prison, having rejected the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and sworn to uphold his apartheid principles.

Feeling a chill to her deepest core, Bakula determines to save Lourens. But that's not the whole story and Bakula won't share the rest of it, not even with her husband.

Bakula teams up with a brilliant, eccentric veteran prison psychologist, Yudel Gordon (featured in a previous Ebersohn series set in the 1980s), to track down the killer in time to save Lourens. As time grows short the pace speeds up, but even more than action, the interest lies in the contrast between South Africa then and now - in some ways not so different, in others completely changed.

This is a character-driven narrative and Bakula is an interesting heroine in part because of her elite background. She spent most of her youth in private schools outside of South Africa, and is as frightened of township gangs as any middle-class white lady would be. But she is also brave and loyal and stubborn and willing to push against the barriers of her fears.

Cape Town writer Ebersohn has captured the strange, tortured, violent, backward-harking and forward-thinking place that is South Africa and readers will hope that Gordon and Bakula return soon.
Akinonris Akinonris
Wessel Ebersohn has delivered a polished diamond of a mystery novel that focuses on life in South Africa today and the repercussions of a violent event that occurred 20 years earlier in 1985. At 15 years-old, Abigail Bakula was one of the few survivors of a massacre of antiapartheid activists, thanks to the intervention of a young white soldier, Leon Lourens.

Abigail now holds a senior position in South Africa's Justice Department. One day, she learns from Lourens that all of the soldiers involved in that raid have been murdered with the exception of himself and the commanding officer who is in a high-security prison. The likely identity of the murderer is known to Abigail as Michael Bishop, a hitman employed by the country's liberation movement prior to Apartheid ending. This is the same person who liberated the survivors of the massacre in 1985 but also committed an act then that still haunts Abigail.

Lourens subsequently is abducted by a mysterious man posing as a police officer. Abigail enlists the support of Yudel Gordon, an eccentric former prison psychologist, and Freek Joraan, the highest-ranking white police officer in South Africa, to help her find Lourens before he is killed by the murderer.

Ebersohn is a brilliant storyteller who weaves a masterful, tautly written tale of suspense in The October Killings. I look forward to his next book, hopefully again featuring Abigail, Yudel and Freek.
MilsoN MilsoN
I really liked this book. I admit I was a little afraid that I'd be overwhelmed with language, but that wasn't the case. There is plenty, but it works in context and it's not impossible. Wessel Ebersohn crafted a great story and makes you feel like you understand the area and the people.

It's a good story, with very, very interesting characters. It started a little slowly, but in a way it reminded me of watching a foreign film so it just seemed to make sense as it meandered. The first half of the book lets you get to know the main characters well so that the second half, when it really picks up steam, you can enjoy the ride and know who's aboard with you. The book isn't long--so when I say first half I'm only talking about 125 pages or so, so when considering whether or not to read this, don't take that into consideration.

I'm not going to give away much here, the synopsis of the book says plenty. What I found compelling about the book was more what it showed, and what it made me want to learn. First of all, I find myself wishing I knew more about South Africa. I'm ashamed of how little I really do know. I remember when Nelson Mandela was freed, and I remember his election. Watching Invictus showed me how important he considered forgiveness in order for his country to move forward. That probably sums up practically everything I know. Wow, did this book not only open my eyes, but make me respect the people of South Africa for what they've gone through. The power of forgiveness, sure, but how to understand and find places for people in society when they worked for the 'bad' side but are essentially good and decent people, or worked for the 'good' side but are essentially sick psychopaths, how to show respect and not be fake, how to bring everyone up together, what a Gordian knot they face.

Think for a minute about the difficulties our country still faces in race relations--and our civil war was 150 years ago and the civil rights act was 50 years ago. We still deal with it, every day. For South Africans, apartheid was abolished 16 years ago. Think how raw things must still be for all of them.

I look forward to reading more of Abigail and Yudel; I hope Mr. Ebersohn doesn't wait long for the next installation.