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eBook City of Tiny Lights ePub

eBook City of Tiny Lights ePub

by Patrick Neate

  • ISBN: 0141009071
  • Category: Mystery
  • Subcategory: Suspense and Obscurity
  • Author: Patrick Neate
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin UK; First Printing edition (July 25, 2006)
  • Pages: 336
  • ePub book: 1774 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1243 kb
  • Other: azw txt rtf mobi
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 443

Description

City of Tiny Lights is a further change of genre, entering the mystery thriller.

City of Tiny Lights is a further change of genre, entering the mystery thriller Where You're At draws on Neate's first love, hip-hop. A passionate supporter of literary diversity, Neate founded Book Slam with Ben Watt (from Everything But The Girl), a prominent and well-regarded storytelling salon in which writers, poets and singer-songwriters perform in a nightclub environment.

Chris Petit feels patronised by Patrick Neate's City of Tiny Lights, a pale pastiche in which nothing rings true

Chris Petit feels patronised by Patrick Neate's City of Tiny Lights, a pale pastiche in which nothing rings true. Neate won the Whitbread novel award with his previous book Twelve Bar Blues, but this, for all its self-conscious mix of good and bad writing, reads like an audition for a TV comedy, with a series of sketches substituting for a lackadaisical plot, padded with hit and miss jokes, an OK one being that Akhtar suspects he eats only to make fags. taste better; more successful than the one comparing death to a Spaghetti Junction, which adds nothing to the notion of either. Cigarettes are Bennies (Benson &Hedges), fired not lit, and snaked out of the packet.

City of Tiny Lights book. From award-winning novelist Patrick Neate, a literary mystery that introduces a new kind of British detective, Ugandan-Indian Tommy Akhtar, and a side of London that the mystery world has never seen.

City of Tiny Lights is a 2016 British crime thriller film directed by Pete Travis and written by Patrick Neate, based on his own 2005 novel of same name. Set in London, it tells the story of a private detective who investigates the disappearance of a Russian prostitute. The film had its world premiere in the Special Presentations section at the 2016 Toronto International Film Festival on 12 September 2016

Neate brilliantly explores the oddball underbelly and wierd cultural mix of London - The City of Tiny Lights - today and questions just what it really means to be British no. .

Neate brilliantly explores the oddball underbelly and wierd cultural mix of London - The City of Tiny Lights - today and questions just what it really means to be British no.He is drawn into a murder investigation, the criminal underworld, the world of fundamentalist religion and maybe even terrorist activities. Neate brilliantly explores the oddball underbelly and wierd cultural mix of London - The City of Tiny Lights - today and questions just what it really means to be British no.

From award-winning novelist Patrick Neate, a literary mystery that introduces a new kind of British detective, Ugandan-Indian Tommy Akhtar, and a side of London that the mystery world has never seen.

Neate wraps Tommy's immigrant status and complex affiliations into an intelligent dénouement, mercifully free of sensationalism, which gains in gravity from the current threat of terrorism. Tommy's attitude and affinities are wholly British but, along the way, Neate's tale throws out some hard, very topical questions about belonging, immigration, Britishness and prejudice - questions which, even assisted by Benny and Turk, Tommy Akhtar, private investigator, is hard-pressed to answer.

Private investigators, Missing persons. New York : Riverhead Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Gutierres on August 29, 2011.

Now a film starring Riz Ahmed, Billie Piper, James Floyd, Cush Jumbo, Roshan Seth and Antonio Aakeel

Now a film starring Riz Ahmed, Billie Piper, James Floyd, Cush Jumbo, Roshan Seth and Antonio Aakeel . Meet Tommy Akhtar, Ugandan Asian cricket fan, devoted son, and not very successful private investigator with offices over his brother Gundappa's mini-cab firm in deepest West London. He's just woken up from his hangover (combing the parting on his tongue) when his next case comes through the door

***Now a film starring Riz Ahmed, Billie Piper, James Floyd, Cush Jumbo, Roshan Seth and Antonio Aakeel*** Meet Tommy Akhtar, Ugandan Asian cricket fan, devoted son, and not very successful private investigator with offices over his brother Gundappa's mini-cab firm in deepest West London. He's just woken up from his hangover (combing the parting on his tongue) when his next case comes through the door. It looks like just another investigation when hooker Melody comes into his office asking him to find her co-worker, Natasha, last seen meeting new client at a bar in Shepherd's Market. But as the search for Natasha intensifies, Tommy's world becomes increasingly sinister. He is drawn into a murder investigation, the criminal underworld, the world of fundamentalist religion and maybe even terrorist activities. Neate brilliantly explores the oddball underbelly and wierd cultural mix of London - The City of Tiny Lights - today and questions just what it really means to be British now. . .

Comments

Detenta Detenta
Though on the surface a murder mystery, the murder part takes a back seat to Neate's characters reacting to the crime. The Product Description and Editorial Reviews above have already told you what you need to know about the story.

With plenty of London street talk; friendships of mutual convenience; dys- and semi-functional families; and denizens of edges of society, we follow our hero (Tommy) as he sticks his nose into places he shouldn't. But, if he hadn't, we wouldn't have had a book to read.

Tommy's attempts to do what is right, if only he'd had some sort of clue as to what 'right' was, land him into mess after mess. From tragedy to downright silly, this was enjoyable.

There were way too many cricket references for any general reading audience. This is another instance of the 'if some is good, more must be better' assumption - and the assumption is false. That, along with the constant repetition of Tommy's smokes and booze, kept this from being a five star read for me.

It is different. Parts are very funny. The characters have some depth. This was well worth my time.
Thetalune Thetalune
I enjoyed this book so much that I wish Patrick Neate would write a series with this main character. He is one awesome writer! I was laughing so many times, and yet it was thought provoking at the same time... I enjoyed the humorous insights into human nature while at the same time a suspenseful and intelligent storyline. This was definitely one of my all time favorite books!
Beazekelv Beazekelv
A friend recommended this book to me. I read it. I loved it. Any description will be a disservice. Take a chance on this book and you won't regret it.
Jonariara Jonariara
great story will make a great movie - look out for it next year.
Murn Murn
Neate's lastest novel is an engaging take on the hard-boiled detective genre, albeit one that perhaps somewhat overextends itself just a bit to much to be considered a total knockout of a book. Set in contemporary London (with a minor excursion to the Lymington seaside), the book revolves around Tommy Akhtar. Now in his mid to late 30s, Tommy was born in Uganda to Indian parents who immigrated to England when Idi Amin came to power. But don't let his colorful background fool you (in his youth he fell in with some people at the local mosque and ended up killing Soviets in Afghanistan), he's a classic Chandleresque private eye. Alcoholic? Check. Chain-smoker? Check. Smart aleck? Check. Cynic? Check. Good-hearted? Check. Got a "friend" on the police force? Check. Poor family life? Check. Pursues interesting case even though he's finished what he was paid to do? Check.

It all kicks off when a hooker hires Tommy to track down her missing flatmate/partner, who apparently owes her money. By the time the book is over, this simple case will have spiraled out of control into a very complex situation involving the murder of a Minister of Parliament, a mysterious Russian, an alleged terrorist group, and a cadre of MI5 and CIA agents. Interwoven with this is background on Tommy's life and his relationship with his dodgy brother and whacked out artist father. When the story follows Tommy down the mean streets, doing his work, tracking down the missing girl, sneaking into hotel rooms, and bantering with the supporting characters, the book works very very well. Neate brilliantly catches the patter and rhythm of dialogue, from Tommy's father's stern scolding to the local Pakistani teenage rude boy's patois. Where the book is somewhat less successful is the convoluted plotting, especially once the intelligence agencies are brought into the thick of things and it all gets rather conspiracy-theoryish.

There's a lot to like in the book as Neate takes the reader along for a very colorful and often funny ride. One aspect that's very welcome is that Tommy is a private eye who takes a lickin' and comes away quite wobbly. It's a rare case of the detective getting roughed up and there being real consequences. Some American readers may have trouble deciphering some of the book's pervasive Brit-slang and there's are running references to cricket tactics, lore, and legends which will elude those not familiar with the sport. These minor quibbles aside, it's a pretty entertaining read that's unlike almost anything else out there in the crime genre. I'll definitely be going back to check out Neate's previous books.

Note: The cover of the U.S. paperback edition has an awesome playful cover illustration of London by design outfit "Eboy", whose work (including similar pixel panoramas of Berlin and Venice) is easily found online.
sunrise bird sunrise bird
Neate's exploration into the Pakistani/Indian subculture of London via Tommy Akhtar's private detective agency is at once entertaining and fascinating. This first person POV ("I did this, I did that.") can distract some people, though I don't mind it.

Tommy Akhtar, the hard-boiled PI, was a muhjahdin in Afghanistan fighting against the Soviets. He came home to London with a drinking problem and a conscience problem. In this novel, a prostitute (her URL is exoticmelody.com) contracts him to find her flatmate, sexyrussion.com, who has disappeared. From there, Tommy gets involved with the Russian mob, some MPs, and Islamist extremists.

The novel is beautifully written. The characters are all round and wonderfully drawn. Tommy himself is a model for a character. He's deep and round, and I think he's wonderful.

The main stopping point for me in this novel was the Briticisms. While that's certainly not a problem in Britain, and I don't think you can change them without substantially changing the flavour of the book (which would be a shame), it can make the reading tough for an American. Tommy's father quotes pithy cricket aphorisms. I read a couple to my husband, who was first batsman for his university, and he didn't get a few of them. Another friend of mine (who emigrated from the Indian subculture of London when he was 16) read the book, and he found some of the phrasing hard to follow. That, and for some reason, in this hard-boiled detective novel, the "eff word" is dashed out, like "f---ing". That drove me insane.

This book gets five stars for the beautiful characters, wonderful background and setting, and intricate plot. Don't let the bleedin' Briticisms stop you from enjoying this great book.

TK Kenyon
Author of Rabid: A Novel and Callous: A Novel