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eBook A Traitor to Memory ePub

eBook A Traitor to Memory ePub

by Elizabeth George

  • ISBN: 0340767081
  • Category: Thrillers and Suspense
  • Subcategory: Suspense and Obscurity
  • Author: Elizabeth George
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton (July 2002)
  • Pages: 816
  • ePub book: 1662 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1615 kb
  • Other: docx azw mbr lrf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 863

Description

None of Elizabeth George's books is anything like. Elizabeth George weaves a rich, spellbinding web. of intrigue and suspense that proves and unlocks

None of Elizabeth George's books is anything like. of intrigue and suspense that proves and unlocks. the secrets of the hear. .I wouldn't miss an Elizabeth George novel. aren't many detective novelists today who can write a scene.

He was even less pleased to learn that the detective had just come from seeing Gideon.

He was even less pleased to learn that the detective had just come from seeing Gideon th tightened as the detective imparted his facts told Jill that he wasn't happy. DI Lynley was watching Richard closely, as if gauging his most minute reaction. This gave Jill a sense of disquiet

Elizabeth George’s first novel, A Great Deliverance, was honored with the Anthony and Agatha Best First Novel .

Elizabeth George’s first novel, A Great Deliverance, was honored with the Anthony and Agatha Best First Novel Awards and received the Grand Prix de Littérature Policière. Her third novel, Well-Schooled in Murder, was awarded the prestigious German prize for suspense fiction, the MIMI. I welcomed the fact that it was a lengthy novel (Gone with the Wind is even longer) but it was a sheer disappointment. It was clear from the first pages who the culprit was and those cursive confessions to the shrink nearly made me into a nutcase too.

A Traitor to Memory" is another thick satisfying book by Elizabeth George. As with most of George's novels, the point of view shifts from character to character - each character very well drawn. Because we were seeing the action from the points of view of several characters, I was able to figure out who committed the murders before the end of the book, but, as with her other novels, the characters held my attention until the end.

Every new Elizabeth George novel is a major publishing event

Every new Elizabeth George novel is a major publishing event. Now the internationally bestselling author shows once again why both The New York Times and the Chicago Tribune have hailed her as a master and why Entertainment Weekly has proclaimed her Detective Inspector Thomas Lynley novels the smartest, most gratifyingly complex and impassioned mystery series now being published

A Traitor to Memory book. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

A Traitor to Memory book.

A Traitor to Memory Bantam Books Inspector Lynley Series.

When Eugenie Davies is killed by a driver on a quiet London street, her death is clearly no accident. Someone struck her with a car and then deliberately ran over her body before driving off, leaving nothing behind but questions. Elizabeth George's first novel, A Great Deliverance, was honored with the Anthony and Agatha Best First Novel Awards and received the Grand Prix de Littérature Policière. A Traitor to Memory Bantam Books Inspector Lynley Series.

by. George, Elizabeth, 1949-.

By (author) Elizabeth George. Other books in this series. A Banquet of Consequences. Free delivery worldwide. d virtuoso violinist Gideon Davies has lost not only his memory of music but also his ability to play the instrument he mastered as a five-year-old prodigy. Elizabeth George. detective mystery, mystery on August 27, 2002 and has 1,009 pages.

Virtuoso violinist Gideon Davies has lost his memory of music and his ability to play the instrument he mastered at the age of five. One fateful night at Wigmore Hall, he lifted his violin to play in a Beethoven trio ...and everything in his mind related to music was gone. Gideon suffers from a form of amnesia, the cure for which is an examination of what he can remember. And what he can remember is little enough until his mind is triggered by the weeping of a woman and a single name: Sonia. One rainy evening, a woman called Eugenie travels to London for a mysterious appointment. But before she is able to reach her destination, a car swoops out of nowhere and kills her in the street. In pursuing her killer, Thomas Lynley, Barbara Havers and Winston Nkata come to know a group of people inextricably connected by a long-ago crime and punishment no one has spoken of for twenty years.

Comments

Clonanau Clonanau
In many ways, the best of the 11 I've read. Long and ambitious, it combines the full Lynley investigation and most of the characters with a whole second book, about one of the characters at the center of the possible suspects. He conducts a parallel search for answers but to a different question. The two paths shed light on each other, but only inform the reader. They don't much help Lynley's team or Gideon Davies. I'm not satisfied with the ending, but it hasn't been 24 hours since I finished it; perhaps I'll change my mind.
Cordabor Cordabor
I generally love Elizabeth George's Lynley/Havers novels. This is the exception. Much of the book consists of lengthy introspective entries from the journal that one of the characters keeps as part of his psychotherapy. The journal entries were so drawn out that I began to suspect that Ms. George's publisher has decided to pay her by the word. The dreary journal entries do provide some background on the other characters from the perspective of the character writing them. The book does have a fairly complex plot and a number of plausible suspects. I did finish it but came quite close to deciding not to finish the book, something that I rarely do.
Kare Kare
2.5 is a more accurate rating. The pacing was excruciatingly slow throughout
this entry in the heretofore enjoyable Lynley/Havers series. The characters were uninteresting and unlikable. The plot was dull, too many loose ends were left untied, and the resolution was hurried but by then, I didn't much care who'd done it. I'm not sure why I finished this other than I paid twelve bucks for it. Had I but known it was a feeble addition, I probably would have saved my money, skipped this, and gone onto the next book in the series.
Xtintisha Xtintisha
"Some books are to be tasted; others to be swallowed; and some few to be chewed and digested" Francis Bacon
I guess you can't put it any better. Unfortunately, the books from the last group are few and far between. I am deeply thankful to all the people who find time to write reviews. I find negative ones most helpful. They do save time and money. But positive reviews may lead you to unearthing a very good writer. How happy I was when I discovered books by Elizabeth George for myself. I was enraptured by George's books: by her manner of writing, colorful descriptions of nature and places as well as true to life characters. All these features make the author's writing unique. E.George's earlier books are like movies in print so vividly and effortlessly the author tells her tales.
But I wish I had been more attentive while reading "A Traitor to Memory" reviews. I welcomed the fact that it was a lengthy novel (Gone with the Wind is even longer) but it was a sheer disappointment. It was clear from the first pages who the culprit was and those cursive confessions to the shrink nearly made me into a nutcase too. They add very little to solving the mystery, in fact the reader is drowning in this shrink morass. As a result instead of whodunit you get a whydunit. I wish all the best to Elisabeth George and I am grateful to her for the first books which are a real treat.
RUL RUL
I love Elizabeth George. However in this very long novel she seems to be drowning. At first it was enticing unwrapping layer after layer to find the murderer, but in the end it became confusing as red herrings didn't come in ones or twos but in shoals. Yes the book was a clever and well written but the author seemed to be constantly trying to maintain the main strand of the story herself. Consequently the reader was often left confused. Finally when the end was revealed there wasn't a sense of finality but rather a disappointing emptiness. How could such a long and often gripping book end or rather trail off with a dodgy unreal ending. I felt as if I had done the hard work of reading over 700 pages but disappointedly had no prize at the end.
Shaktit Shaktit
I have been a fan of Elizabeth George's Thomas Lynley mysteries since the first one. My favorite parts have been the sharp interaction between Lynley and Barbara Havers and my least favorite parts have been the soap opera qualities of the one-note interpersonal relationships between the navel-gazing Lynley/Perfect Lady Helen/Sainted Simon St. James/Pitiful Deborah. Unfortunately for me, there was precious little interaction between Lynley and Havers, and far too many soap opera moments. In this book, Lynley is worried (still) about whether he is a decent man for accidentally crippling Simon all those years ago and to this he adds his nagging belief that he may not have played fair with Deborah and her abortion all those years ago. This causes him to doubt whether he can have, or even deserves, any future happiness. By now, most readers know Lynley's story from earlier books and mentally incorporate it into feelings for the man who solves such heinous crimes by brilliant detective work. While I realize that a major theme of the book was the destructive qualities of secrets from the past, some of us want to move past the soapy aspects, not wallow in them.
The story is essentially of concert violinst Gideon Davies' inablity to play and this inability's relationship with a series of murders Lynley must solve. It is told in fragmented narration, in regular time and in the diary Gideon keeps for his shrink, Dr. Rose. This is confusing, especially when events have occurred (like the hit and run with which the book opens)and are not noted by Gideon's diary until much later or are not reacted to until much later. (The hit and run victim disappears until the final third of the book.) The story could have been told in consecutive narration, including the diary if George wished, and left room for more character development. Also, this might have minimized the diary, which I found tedious to read after a while, and might have tied up loose ends like when did Gideon see his mother as she asked for money and not recognize her as he tells Libby he did?
So much of the book was spent in recreating Gideon's past through his diary that character development and interaction - the magic of the book and George's strongest asset - was lost. There is precious little of Lynley's upper class interactions with the enthusiastically proletariate Havers, Havers heartbreaking musings about her dead brother and elderly mother, Havers budding friendship with her charming Pakistani neighbor Hidayya, or any other bits that bring the characters to life and make readers love them. The only character who developed significantly was Winston Nkata, who has the potential to become as interesting and loved as Havers.
This story did not need Lynley, Havers, Webberly, Nkata, or HIlliers. It was a generic story that could have been told with ordinary characters from a decent detective to his equally pleasant wife. The qualities that have made Lynley books special were utterly lacking and I am terribly disappointed in it.