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eBook Traps: A Novel of the FBI ePub

eBook Traps: A Novel of the FBI ePub

by Paul Lindsay

  • ISBN: 0743215060
  • Category: Thrillers and Suspense
  • Subcategory: Suspense and Obscurity
  • Author: Paul Lindsay
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; First Edition edition (October 1, 2002)
  • Pages: 272
  • ePub book: 1940 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1626 kb
  • Other: mbr rtf azw docx
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 207

Description

Paul Lindsay will appeal to readers who like the novels of Patricia Cornwell and Robert W. Walker. As readers of Paul Lindsay novels know, the former FBI agent often portrays the modern day FBI in a less than flattering manner.

Paul Lindsay will appeal to readers who like the novels of Patricia Cornwell and Robert W. What John Grisham did for layers in his novels, Paul Lindsey has done for the FBI. However, usually Paul Lindsey novels have at their core an agent hero fighting a flawed system where stats and appearances weigh more heavily than actual police work.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Traps: A Novel of the FBI as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Justice has become a distant ideal for disenchanted FBI agent Jack Kincade  . Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Book in the Novels of the FBI Series). Justice has become a distant ideal for disenchanted FBI agent Jack Kincade. Once a bright light of the Bureau, he lives in a seedy motel, his largely off-duty hours dominated by rotgut vodka and an unusual sideline: robbing banks.

The FBI quickly created a six-person team to try to determine what had . Each of the characters in the novel is named for a day of the week.

The FBI quickly created a six-person team to try to determine what had gone wrong. Meanwhile, the CIA, across the Potomac in Langley, Virginia, was having its own troubles. But in the dreamlike fantasy, nothing is as it first appears.

Paul Lindsay graduated from MacMurray College in 1968 and served a tour of duty in Vietnam as a Marine Corps infantry officer. He later joined the FBI and worked in the Detroit office for twenty years

Paul Lindsay graduated from MacMurray College in 1968 and served a tour of duty in Vietnam as a Marine Corps infantry officer. He later joined the FBI and worked in the Detroit office for twenty years. He is the author of five other novels - Freedom to Kill; Code Name: Gentkill; Witness to the Truth; The Fuehrer's Reserve; and Traps. He lives in Rye, New Hampshire.

TRAPS: A Novel of the FBI'. A former FBI agent, Paul Lindsay is the author of five books. October 9, 2002, 10:15 AM, CBS. His latest is a thriller centered on an unsolved kidnapping, and the developing partnership between Jack Kincade-a debauched but brilliant street agent with a penchant for gambling and bank robbery-and Ben Alton, who has just lost part of his leg to cancer. When Alton's daughter is abducted by the prime suspect, Alton and Kincade must race against time to save her, and themselves. The Big Scam: A Novel of the FBI. المؤلف. Simon and Schuster, 2005.

Paul Lindsay, Traps: A Novel of the FBI Paul Lindsay, The Fuhrer's Reserve: A Novel of the .

Paul Lindsay, Traps: A Novel of the FBI Paul Lindsay, The Fuhrer's Reserve: A Novel of the FBI Paul Lindsay, The Big Scam: A Novel of the FBI. Patricia Cornwell's Kay Scarpetta series has FBI characters. Margaret Truman, Murder at the FBI. Source(s): I'm a reference librarian. Mary N · 1 decade ago. 1.

Find nearly any book by Paul Lindsay. Learn More at LibraryThing. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Witness to the Truth. ISBN 9780586217313 (978-0-586-21731-3) Softcover, HarperCollins Publishers Ltd, 1993. Find signed collectible books: 'Witness to the Truth'.

Drawn into a three-year-old unsolved kidnapping case, disenchanted FBI agent Jack Kincade finds himself racing the clock with disabled fellow agent Ben Alton when the kidnapped child's father threatens to detonate a bomb.

Comments

Erennge Erennge
Great author and very well written with an exellent plot as always.
Bort Bort
Nicely done
Whitecaster Whitecaster
Paul Lindsay has captivated me from the first book of his that I picked up. Could have read it without putting it down if I had that kind of time.
Silvermaster Silvermaster
enjoyed the complex story about the flawed protagonist.
Yla Yla
As the title implies, traps of various kinds pepper the plot, including "bank traps," which underachieving FBI agent Jack Kincade uses to rip off bank night deposit drops. The money doesn't go towards supporting an affluent lifestyle; this down-and-out divorcee is living in a dive motel, drinking cheap vodka, and driving a battered minivan. But poker money has to come from somewhere.
Jack, who's found all the ways to dodge work a bureaucracy can offer, must investigate a massive bomb threat. A desperate man planted the bomb hoping to force the FBI to finally solve his daughter's murder. Jack partners with Ben Alton to follow some leads.
The two couldn't be more different. Ben, a family man, is a go-getter who worked his way up from the projects. He sets his mind to something and doesn't give up. But he's not working at 100% because he recently lost the lower half of his leg to cancer, and though he's back a month early to help with the investigation, the boss assigns him to desk duty for his own safety.
Of all the available agents, these two seem the least likely to succeed, but Jack's sharp powers of deduction and Ben's unstoppable energy work together well, and with some luck, the old crime is solved. But questions still remain, and the pair dig deeper to find another more-horrifying layer of murderous revenge. They must stay one step ahead of the villain and his traps; Jack's got to stay ahead of the FBI's internal police.
This audiobook had me hooked from start to finish. The pace never slows, nor does it move too fast that you can't understand what's happening. I'm no expert on the FBI, but the author certainly made me feel I was inside the organization, with its politics and personalities. Some events stretched the limits of disbelief, but I don't think they went too far.

As for the performance by the reader, it was mostly OK, but I have a few compaints. The voice of Jack was very gruff. At first I didn't think I'd want to sit through a whole book with that voice. I got used to it, but I never really liked it. He also mispronounced "interment" as "internment." My biggest gripe however is how his voice dropped off at the end of sentences. Since I listen while driving, hearing those words was quite a problem.
And sure, the "odd couple" pairing of Ben and Jack has been done to death, but this author pulled it off. They fire off some funny lines and it never became tiresome. The writing style is clear, never overwrought. This book isn't the same old thing. It's actually darn good.
Buzalas Buzalas
It has been three years since his daughter has been kidnapped and the FBI still has not the slightest idea what happened to Leah Ziven. Her father Conrad builds a bomb and plants it under the Cook County jail, which houses over 15,000 prisoners. Only he has the combination to disarm the bomb and he won't give it out until they find his daughter.

FBI agent Jack Kincade, a man who robs banks as a sideline is partnered with Ben Alton, an amputee victim with something to prove. The hastily formed team finds the girl's body and the ransom at an abandoned shack. Leah's father gives them the data they need to remove the bomb but that doesn't end the case because the killer is still out there. Ben and Jack (not Jerry, silly) are on his case, trying to break him, a very dangerous thing to do to a psychopath with nothing left to lose.

TRAPS is a fascinating crime thriller due to the enigmatic anti-hero Jack Kincade. He's a drunk and a gambler who cut off all communication with his son. He robs banks to support his gambling habit yet in spite of all these failing, readers feel drawn to this bad boy because they sense there is a kernel of decency and goodness buried in his heart, waiting to bloom under the right conditions. Paul Lindsay will appeal to readers who like the novels of Patricia Cornwell and Robert W. Walker.

Harriet Klausner
It's so easy It's so easy
As readers of Paul Lindsay novels know, the former FBI agent often portrays the modern day FBI in a less than flattering manner. What John Grisham did for layers in his novels, Paul Lindsey has done for the FBI. However, usually Paul Lindsey novels have at their core an agent hero fighting a flawed system where stats and appearances weigh more heavily than actual police work. In this thoroughly depressing novel, which also lacks any shred of humor found in his other works, the hero is fatally flawed on so many levels; the conclusion becomes anti-climatic and expected.
Jack Kincade is an alcoholic, a degenerate gambler according to his ex-wife's attorney, a non-existent father to his son, Cole, and a burned out FBI agent. Emotionally dead to himself and others, he spices up his life by robbing banks using a technique perfected years ago involving night deposits. Assigned to investigate those same cases, which are very low dollar in terms of risk and reward, he has managed to dead end them all to this point. However, a lie can only be sustained so long.
Thanks to the unexpected re-opening of a three-year-old kidnapping case after the frustrated father plants a bomb under the local jail, Jack Kincade's world slowly begins to its final collapse. Partnered with Agent Ben Alton who is currently in remission form cancer after doctors amputated part of one leg, they begin to work the case. But in so doing, while successful on one level, Alton makes a fatal error in judgment with massive repercussions for everyone. With all the speed and emotion of geologic plates, this novel grinds toward a steadily darker life for all the characters involved in this novel.
This certainly is not the best that Paul Lindsey has to offer. Virtually all the characters involved in this 260-page novel, are robotic in thought, emotion, and deed. That fact coupled with the incredible amount of loathing and self hatred expressed by many of these characters is appalling. The redeeming motivations found in his works are sadly lacking in this effort. Hopefully, this book is not a sign that like his fictional characters; Paul Lindsey is burned out as an author.