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eBook Billion Dollar Brain ePub

eBook Billion Dollar Brain ePub

by Len Deighton

  • ISBN: 0425053555
  • Category: Thrillers and Suspense
  • Subcategory: Suspense and Obscurity
  • Author: Len Deighton
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Berkley (May 15, 1982)
  • ePub book: 1142 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1965 kb
  • Other: doc docx txt lrf
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 640

Description

Billion Dollar Brain is a 1967 British Technicolor espionage film directed by Ken Russell and based on the novel of the same name by Len Deighton.

Billion Dollar Brain is a 1967 British Technicolor espionage film directed by Ken Russell and based on the novel of the same name by Len Deighton. The film features Michael Caine as secret agent Harry Palmer, the anti-hero protagonist. The "brain" of the title is a sophisticated computer with which an anti-communist organisation controls its worldwide anti-Soviet spy network.

Billion-Dollar Brain. Secret File No. 4. Spring is a virgin, summer a mother, autumn a widow, winter a stepmother. However, having arrived at a concept, part of the joy I derived in approaching this challenge was the quest to locate the various props which the author had so beautifully detailed in his texts. The classic spy thriller of lethal computer-age intrigue and a maniac’s private cold war, featuring the same anonymous narrator and milieu of The IPCRESS File. The fourth of Deighton’s novels to be narrated by the unnamed employee of WOOC§ is the thrilling story of an anti-communist espionage network owned by a Texan billionaire, General Midwinter, run from a vast computer complex known as the Brain.

The Billion Dollar Brain by legendary spymaster Len Deighton is narrated by a British intelligence agent whose name we never learn. His mission is to infiltrate a clandestine private espionage network dedicated to freeing Latvia from the grip of its Soviet overlords.

Used availability for Len Deighton's The Billion Dollar Brain. January 1983 : UK Hardback. Len Deighton The fourth of Deighton’s novels to be narrated by the unnamed employee . The fourth of Deighton’s novels to be narrated by the unnamed employee of WOOC(P) is the thrilling story of an anti-communist espionage network owned by a Texan billionaire, General Midwinter, run from a vast computer complex known as the Brain Читать весь отзыв.

Even Signe had been a little nervous about that, especially with the four of us inside it, for the ice would not last a lot longer.

Even Signe had been a little nervous about that, especially with the four of us inside it, for the ice would not last a lot longer hrinkage and cracking of the ice at the water’s edge and pronounced it safe. We were four because Ralph Pike was with us now. He had said hardly anything since we had picked him up at a draughty street corner where the Hanko road leaves Helsinki. He was wearing a peaked cap of brown leather and a long black overcoat

Billion-Dollar Brain is a 1966 Cold War spy novel by Len Deighton. It was the fourth to feature an unnamed secret agent working for the British WOOC(P) intelligence agency.

Billion-Dollar Brain is a 1966 Cold War spy novel by Len Deighton. It follows The IPCRESS File (1962), Horse Under Water (1963), and Funeral in Berlin (1964). As in most of the author's novels, the plot of Billion Dollar Brain (1967) is intricate, with many dead ends. The classic spy thriller of lethal computer-age intrigue and a maniac's private cold war, featuring the same anonymous narrator and milieu of The IPCRESS File

Billion-Dollar Brain. The classic spy thriller of lethal computer-age intrigue and a maniac's private cold war, featuring the same anonymous narrator and milieu of The IPCRESS File. The fourth of Deighton's novels to be narrated by the unnamed employee of WOOC(P) is the thrilling story of an anti-communist espionage network owned by a Texan billionaire, General Midwinter, run from a. vast computer complex known as the Brain.

Deighton, Len, 1929-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. Gutierres on February 2, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Comments

Use_Death Use_Death
Part of the "Harry Palmer" series -- though the character is only "Harry Palmer" in the films -- by Len Deighton. Of them, this was the least convincing to me as a story. Deighton tries to bring the real world into the fictional one by having "Harry" -- or our MOOC(P) Op -- take on a fanatical right-wing militia funded by a billionaire whose goal is to force the USA and USSR into a conflict he expects the USA to win. The plot seems forced, and Deighton seemed to be trying just a bit too hard with this one.
Blackstalker Blackstalker
A marked contrast to the exotic locations and people featured in the Bond novels - shabby, down at heel and forever concerned about who should be replacing the '2 pound bag of sugar' for the tea fund! Working in the government myself I can relate to all the petty nonsenses that keep us going on a daily basis. Deighton's descriptions of towns, country-side and people are often way too close to the bone - but brilliant.
Gaudiker Gaudiker
Another solid book from Len Deighton…well developed characters and interesting plot. Wish it had been longer.
Livina Livina
Deighton recreates the Civil Service atmosphere of espionage that somehow enables the British to triumph over Russia and private spies.
Duzshura Duzshura
A
Xmatarryto Xmatarryto
At some point in Billion Dollar Brain, the unnamed British spy from whose perspective the story is told says to an American named Midwinter: "You think the best way to contribute to a dangerous situation is to raise a private army out of your profits on cans of oil and beans, frozen orange juice and advertising, and to operate your own undeclared war against the Russians." That pretty well sums up the plot. Midwinter wants to recruit the unnamed British spy to his private army of agents; the Brit plays along to learn what Midwinter is planning. The premise is thin and not particularly credible, but it leads into a fun, well-written story that feels only slightly dated despite its 1966 vintage (other than giving the book its title, computers are fairly peripheral to the plot, fortunate given that they operate as little more than expensive answering machines).

In its depiction of paranoid overreaction to the perceived threat of Communism, Billion Dollar Brain reminds me of Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove. Kubrick's humor is over-the-top while Deighton's is of the understated British variety -- the film is played for laughs while Deighton's novel retains the elements of a thriller -- but both use satire to make the same fundamental point: "facts are no substitute for intelligence" and all the nefarious facts that could be mustered about Khrushchev's Russia would not have justified the decision to initiate a world-ending nuclear conflict.

Billion Dollar Brain is written with an understated nonchalance, low-key humor perhaps too frequently offsetting the tension of high-stakes espionage. Although it is one of Len Deighton's early novels, he wielded all the tricks in a seasoned writer's arsenal to direct a play in the reader's mind. Dialog often makes the reader picture scenes that are never directly described; non sequiturs force the reader to rethink characters and settings; offhand remarks help the reader imagine the details of a character's personality. The plot takes a couple of perfect twists before arriving at a satisfying conclusion.

Billion Dollar Brain doesn't have the same heft as Deighton's later novels but the story is fun, the characters are quirky, and the writing is so engaging that the novel is of enduring value.
Dalarin Dalarin
The Billion Dollar Brain by legendary spymaster Len Deighton is narrated by a British intelligence agent whose name we never learn. His mission is to infiltrate a clandestine private espionage network dedicated to freeing Latvia from the grip of its Soviet overlords.
The tongue-in-cheek cloak and dagger tale contained within the pages of The Billion Dollar Brain takes place in London, Helsinki, Riga, Leningrad, New York and San Antonio.

On the positive side, there's plenty of understated British humor. Moreover, the author shows respect for the intelligence of his readers by not spelling everything out.

On the negative side, the plotting is too over-the-top and silly to maintain reader interest. I had the distinct impression as I worked my way through the convoluted narrative that the characters themselves thought everything they were doing ridiculous and ultimately futile.
Granted, this is as much a satire of a spy novel as it is a spy novel. Still, coherency of plot (or at least some semblance of same) would have enhanced reader enjoyment.

A three star effort. No more, no less.